Stories indexed under: Zoology

Total: 33   RSSRSS feed

  • Photo: Melanoplus grasshopper Grasshoppers signal slow recovery of post-agricultural woodlands, study finds Nov. 24, 2014 New research by Philip Hahn and John Orrock at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on the recovery of South Carolina longleaf pine woodlands once used for cropland shows just how long lasting the legacy of agriculture can be in the recovery of natural places. By comparing grasshoppers found at woodland sites once used for agriculture to similar sites never disturbed by farming, Hahn and Orrock show that despite decades of recovery, the numbers and types of species found in each differ.
  • Photo: Swimming leatherback turtle Plump turtles swim better: First models of swimming animals Oct. 29, 2014 For the first time, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Florida Atlantic University (FAU), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have measured the forces that act on a swimming animal and the energy the animal must expend to move through the water.
  • Balancing birds and biofuels: Grasslands support more species than cornfields Oct. 9, 2014 In Wisconsin, bioenergy is for the birds. Really. In a study published today in the journal PLOS ONE, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) scientists examined whether corn and perennial grassland fields in southern Wisconsin could provide both biomass for bioenergy production and bountiful bird habitat. The research team found that where there are grasslands, there are birds. Grass-and-wildflower-dominated fields supported more than three times as many bird species as cornfields, including 10 imperiled species found only in the grasslands.
  • Photo: Lodgepole pine forest Mountain pine beetles get a bad rap for wildfires, study says Sept. 29, 2014 Mountain pine beetles get a bad rap, and understandably so. The grain-of-rice-sized insects are responsible for killing pine trees over tens of millions of acres in the Western U.S. and Canada over the last decade. But contrary to popular belief, these pests may not be to blame for more severe wildfires like those that have recently swept through the region. Instead, according to a new study by UW-Madison zoology professor Monica Turner, weather and topography play a greater role in the ecological severity of fires than these bark-boring beetles.
  • Photo: Brandon Barton Dwindling wind may tip predator-prey balance Sept. 19, 2014 Bent and tossed by the wind, a field of soybean plants presents a challenge for an Asian lady beetle on the hunt for aphids. But what if the air - and the soybeans - were still?
  • Babbling brooks adding to climate change? May 23, 2014 Studying stream bubbles isn't exactly a walk in the park - what with the mud and ticks, the long days hiking and swimming through mucky streams, the sun exposure and scratching brush.
  • Sea turtle Baby sea turtles spend ‘lost years’ in warm blankets of seaweed March 4, 2014 Nosing their way out of eggs buried in sandy beaches from Florida’s east coast north into the Carolinas, baby loggerhead sea turtles race to the water as fast as their flippers will carry them and begin a swim frenzy to clear the predator-rich shore.
  • Photo: Ellen Damschen Seed dispersal gets a test in carved-out ‘habitat corridors’ Feb. 24, 2014 Field ecologists go to great lengths to get data: radio collars and automatic video cameras are only two of their creative techniques for documenting the natural world. So when a group of ecologists set out to see how wind moves seeds through isolated patches of habitat carved into a longleaf pine plantation in South Carolina, they twisted colored yarn to create mock seeds that would drift with the wind much like native seeds.
  • Photo: Ann Smart-Martin (left) and Lynn Nyhart ‘Cabinet of curiosities’ captures nature through work of artists and scientists Feb. 21, 2014 Of all the places Sierra Swenson expected to end up during her first semester at college, precious few were lined with jars full of preserved reptiles.
  • Photo: snail on leaf Eavesdropping plants prepare to be attacked Aug. 5, 2013 In a world full of hungry predators, prey animals must be constantly vigilant to avoid getting eaten. But plants face a particular challenge when it comes to defending themselves.
  • A virtual elephant from a marriage of biology, engineering, and art May 29, 2013 The solid aluminum cast of an elephant on Warren Porter's desk has been waiting for 25 years.
  • UW-Madison zoologist elected to prestigious academy April 30, 2013 Anthony Ives, Plaenert-Bascom Professor of Zoology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, has been elected to membership in the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
  • Ten faculty selected for Distinguished Teaching Awards March 12, 2013 Ten University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty members have been chosen to receive this year’s Distinguished Teaching Awards.
  • Eleven professors appointed to named professorships Oct. 6, 2011 Eleven distinguished faculty members have received named professorships, some of the highest honors for established faculty.
  • Photo: San Miguel Precipitation, predators may be key in ecological regulation of infectious disease April 14, 2011 A little information can go a surprisingly long way when it comes to understanding rodent-borne infectious disease, as shown by a new study led by John Orrock from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • UW-Madison trio named Leopold Leadership Fellows Feb. 28, 2011 Three University of Wisconsin-Madison professors are among only 20 academics from throughout North America chosen this year to participate in a prestigious environmental leadership and communications training program.
  • Photo: Siskiyou National Forest Study: Mountain vegetation impacted by climate change Oct. 25, 2010 Climate change has had a significant effect on mountain vegetation at low elevations in the past 60 years, according to a study done by the University of California at Davis, the University of Wisconsin-Madison and U.S. Geological Survey.
  • Honeysuckle Invasive shrubs increase spread of tick-borne disease Oct. 11, 2010 For a hungry tick, bush honeysuckle is as good as a drive-through.
  • Portion of info graphic Report casts world’s rivers in ‘crisis state’ Sept. 29, 2010 The world's rivers, the single largest renewable water resource for humans and a crucible of aquatic biodiversity, are in a crisis of ominous proportions, according to a new global analysis.
  • Special symposium addresses practical applications of evolution Sept. 14, 2010 The Center of Rapid Evolution (CORE) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is sponsoring a special event to foster discussion and outreach about how the science of evolution applies to real-world problems.