Stories indexed under: Science

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  • Research communications experts partner with Morgridge Institute March 2, 2015 Dietram Scheufele and colleagues in the Department of Life Sciences Communication (LSC) are partnering with the Morgridge Institute for Research to take a deeper look at what works — and why — in engaging the public on science. Morgridge provides a unique proving ground for the topic: In partnership with the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, science outreach programs bring more than 30,000 participants to the Discovery Building each year.
  • Photo: aerial view of the Aspen Free-Air Carbon dioxide and ozone Enrichment (Aspen FACE) experiment site Munching bugs thwart eager trees, reducing the carbon sink March 2, 2015 A new study published today [Monday, March 2, 2015] in Nature Plants shows that hungry, plant-eating insects may limit the ability of forests to take up elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, reducing their capacity to slow human-driven climate change.
  • Study reveals possible biological trigger for canine bone cancer Feb. 25, 2015 Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine (SVM) have identified the biological mechanism that may give some cancer cells the ability to form tumors in dogs. The recent study uncovered an association between the increased expression of a particular gene in tumor cells and more aggressive behavior in a form of canine bone cancer. It may also have implications for human cancers by detailing a new pathway for tumor formation.
  • Computer sciences, mathematics professors win Sloan Fellowships Feb. 23, 2015 Two University of Wisconsin-Madison professors have been selected for Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowships - an honor awarded on a competitive basis to promising young researchers in the early stages of their careers.
  • Photo: Aicardo Roa-Espinosa Helping Wisconsin dairy farms produce ‘brown gold’ Feb. 20, 2015 In the heart of Wisconsin, a project is underway to produce energy from a resource in little danger of running low: cow manure, also known as "brown gold."
  • Photo: Rebecca Blank U.S. biomedical research in crisis: UW-Madison takes charge Feb. 19, 2015 The university is poised to help lead the national conversation to address the systemic flaws within the American biomedical research enterprise and will host a workshop April 11 to share ideas on how to fix it.
  • Photo: Microscopic image of cellulose nanofibers Contest seeks another round of amazing science images Feb. 10, 2015 To highlight the visual and scientific value of scientific imagery, the fifth annual Cool Science Image Contest is soliciting the best images from students and faculty and staff scientists on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus.
  • Photo: Biochemistry research Campus push to address crisis in U.S. biomedical research Feb. 10, 2015 The growing realization that the American biomedical research enterprise is unsustainable and requires a comprehensive fix will be the subject of a wide-ranging campus conversation to take place over the next few months.
  • Sidebar: Sessions set to discuss biomedical research crisis Feb. 10, 2015 A series of campus-wide discussions to gather feedback and ideas from researchers — faculty, staff scientists, postdocs, and graduate students as well as administrative staff — on what many people believe is a crisis in U.S. biomedical research has been scheduled for March.
  • Darwin Day celebration focuses on islands, isolation Feb. 9, 2015 What do Madagascar and Jurassic Park have in common? Both are island-based evolutionary “experiments” that will be highlighted in this year’s Darwin Day celebrations, sponsored by the J.F. Crow Institute for the Study of Evolution at UW-Madison and its partners. “Darwin Day 2015: Islands and Isolation” will run all day Thursday, Feb. 12, and focus on the unique opportunity that islands provide to witness evolution and the diversity of life.
  • Photo: Lynn Haynes in the School of Medicine and Public Health 2013 research expenditure data show UW-Madison ranks 4th Feb. 5, 2015 According to figures released today by the National Science Foundation (NSF), research expenditures at the University of Wisconsin-Madison took a slight dip in 2013, landing Wisconsin’s flagship university in the number four spot among universities nationwide.
  • Photo: Corn at the West Madison Agricultural Research Station UW botanist harnesses the grid to illuminate crop growth Feb. 4, 2015 With help from the Center for High Throughput Computing (CHTC), botany Professor Edgar Spalding is applying this astronomical sense of scale to our understanding of corn. Spalding uses the HTC capabilities pioneered by Miron Livny, Morgridge Institute for Research chief technology officer, to quantify the incredibly complex process of corn growth from seed to vigorous seedling — not just one at a time, but over thousands of samples.
  • Photo: Su-Chun Zhang supervising his lab Laying a foundation for treating ALS, spinal cord injury Feb. 2, 2015 Su-Chun Zhang, a professor of neuroscience and neurology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Waisman Center, and his research team have published a unique model for learning more about the role of human astrocytes today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation today. The findings may lay a foundation for the treatment of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) and debilitating spinal cord injuries.
  • Carl Djerassi, UW grad who helped create ‘the pill,’ dies at 91 Jan. 31, 2015
  • Photo: implantable brain sensor Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation near the top of the patent charts for 2013 Jan. 29, 2015 In 2013, with 160 patents, the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) was near the pinnacle of the university patent heap.
  • Photo: Ernest Micek New $3M distinguished chair at UW-Madison honors influential alumnus Jan. 28, 2015 A newly established professorship will allow the University of Wisconsin-Madison to hire new faculty to build upon its widely recognized leadership in chemical and biological engineering. Supported by a $3 million commitment from the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), the Ernest Micek Distinguished Chair in Chemical and Biological Engineering will honor a UW-Madison graduate with a long record of service to UW-Madison.
  • Illustration: “Atomic Size Matters” comic book No joke: Chemistry thesis transmuted into comic book Jan. 28, 2015 As thesis writing approached, University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate student Veronica Berns faced a conundrum. She knew how hard it was to describe her work to friends and family — indeed, anybody outside the tight clan of structural chemists. And that was particularly true since she concentrated on a category of should-be-impossible structures called “quasicrystals.” However, Berns liked drawing and using “normal, English-language words,” and so about a year before graduation, she opted to accompany her traditional Ph.D. thesis with a comic book version.
  • Calculating the future of solar-fuel refineries Jan. 23, 2015 A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has developed a new tool to help plot the future of solar fuels. In a paper recently published in the journal Energy & Environmental Science, a team led by chemical and biological engineering Professors Christos Maravelias and George Huber outlined a tool to help engineers better gauge the overall yield, efficiency and costs associated with scaling solar-fuel production processes up into large-scale refineries.
  • Photo: An island of forest in a sea of soy agriculture in Mato Grosso Study shows Brazil’s Soy Moratorium still needed to preserve Amazon Jan. 22, 2015 Today, fewer chicken nuggets can trace their roots to cleared Amazon rain forest.
  • Photo: Dog brains with and without Pelizaeus Merzbacher disease modeling Rare neurological disease shines light on health of essential nerve cells Jan. 22, 2015 Ian Duncan is a Scotsman with the iron discipline and stamina of a competitive marathoner, triathlete and cross-country skier. As a neuroscientist at the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he's applied his tenacity to a rare genetic disorder.