Stories indexed under: Science

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  • Photo: close-up of atom probe Made-in-Wisconsin atom probe assisted dating of oldest piece of earth April 17, 2014 It's a scientific axiom: big claims require extra-solid evidence. So there were skeptics in 2001 when University of Wisconsin-Madison geoscience professor John Valley dated an ancient crystal found in Australia to 4.4 billion years ago. The date, after all, was only 100 million years after Earth started to solidify from a ball of molten rock.
  • Photo: David Beebe The key to easy asthma diagnosis is in the blood April 15, 2014 Using just a single drop of blood, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers has developed a faster, cheaper and more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma.
  • Photo: infant rhesus monkey at the Harlow Center, taken by the Coe Lab. Hair from infants gives clues about their life in the womb April 15, 2014 Like rings of a tree, hair can reveal a lot of information about the past.
  • Research team to search for new antibiotics from untapped microbes April 14, 2014 Facing an imminent global public health crisis, a University of Wisconsin-Madison research team has been awarded up to $16 million from the National Institutes of Health to find new sources of antibiotics to combat the rising number of deadly antibiotic-resistant infections.
  • Wisconsin research shows green space keeps you from feeling blue April 11, 2014 If you start feeling better as spring begins pushing up its tender shoots, you might be living proof of a trend discovered in data from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin: The more green space in the neighborhood, the happier people reported feeling.
  • Photo: Patagonian beech gall Scientists firm up origin of cold-adapted yeasts that make cold beer April 9, 2014 As one of the most widely consumed and commercially important beverages on the planet, one would expect the experts to know everything there is to know about lager beer.
  • Sean Carroll "Your Inner Fish," with strong UW connections, premieres on PBS April 8, 2014 A University of Wisconsin-Madison professor wants to help more people get to know their ancestors.
  • Science Expeditions Science Expeditions event opens doors to UW-Madison research April 3, 2014 Science Expeditions, the University of Wisconsin-Madison's 12th annual science open house, is as big as ever, and awaiting thousands of curious visitors April 4-6.
  • Photo: Hong Chen Study helps unravel the tangled origin of ALS April 3, 2014 By studying nerve cells that originated in patients with a severe neurological disease, a University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher has pinpointed an error in protein formation that could be the root of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
  • Photo: Arabidopsis thaliana How plants adapt: Calcium waves help the roots tell the shoots April 3, 2014 For Simon Gilroy, sometimes seeing is believing. In this case, it was seeing the wave of calcium sweep root-to-shoot in the plants the University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of botany is studying that made him a believer.
  • Photo: 4.4 billion year old Zircon Oldest bit of Earth’s crust among attractions at Geology Museum open house April 1, 2014 It promises to be a trip through geologic time: from a look at the oldest piece of Earth's crust, to the earliest smells on our planet, to a recently crash-landed Martian meteorite.
  • Photo: Richard Weindruch Monkey caloric restriction study shows big benefit; contradicts earlier study April 1, 2014 The latest results from a 25-year study of diet and aging in monkeys shows a significant reduction in mortality and in age-associated diseases among those with calorie-restricted diets. The study, begun at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1989, is one of two ongoing, long-term U.S. efforts to examine the effects of a reduced-calorie diet on nonhuman primates.
  • Tom Steele Science on Tap sparks UW, Northwoods dialogue April 1, 2014 University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers are highlighting the university’s impact more than 200 miles away from campus through a series of conversations involving community members on topics ranging from carnivore conservation to climate change.
  • Moss capsule Winning images reveal the aesthetic side of UW science March 25, 2014 From the frumpish mug of an oyster toadfish to delicate crystalline “flowers” of cobalt pyrite, 12 winners of the 2014 University of Wisconsin-Madison Cool Science Image contest were announced today, Tuesday, March 24.
  • Photo illustration: stem cells superimposed over man sitting in airport ‘Stem cell tourism’ takes advantage of patients, says law professor March 24, 2014 Desperate patients are easy prey for unscrupulous clinics offering untested and risky stem cell treatments, says law and bioethics Professor Alta Charo of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who is studying "stem cell tourism."
  • Photo: Masatoshi Suzuki Researchers discover new way to make muscle cells from human stem cells March 21, 2014 As stem cells continue their gradual transition from the lab to the clinic, a research group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has discovered a new way to make large concentrations of skeletal muscle cells and muscle progenitors from human stem cells.
  • New Milky Way portrait to be on Town Center media wall March 20, 2014 The dramatic new infrared picture of the plane of our galaxy will be viewable for the next week on the large media wall in the Town Center of the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery on the UW-Madison campus.
  • Milky Way portrait Dramatic new portrait helps define Milky Way’s shape, contents March 20, 2014 Using more than 2 million images collected by NASA’s orbiting Spitzer Space Telescope, a team of Wisconsin scientists has stitched together a dramatic 360-degree portrait of the Milky Way, providing new details of our galaxy’s structure and contents.
  • Photo: Timothy Shedd Startup focuses on reliable, efficient cooling for computer servers March 20, 2014 In a dark, windy room on the top floor of Engineering Hall on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus, racks of computers are processing information for a college that relies, like all technical fields, on massive computing power. The noise comes from multiple fans located inside each computer case and from the large air conditioner that drives currents through the room to remove waste heat from the processors.
  • Photo: E. coli bacteria In the lab, scientists coax E. coli to resist radiation damage March 17, 2014 Capitalizing on the ability of an organism to evolve in response to punishment from a hostile environment, scientists have coaxed the model bacterium Escherichia coli to dramatically resist ionizing radiation and, in the process, reveal the genetic mechanisms that make the feat possible.