Stories indexed under: Research

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  • Photo: Jonathan Patz Actions on climate change bring better health, study says Sept. 22, 2014 The number of extremely hot days in Eastern and Midwestern U.S. cities is projected to triple by mid-century, according to a new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers and published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
  • Ultrasound Ultrasound enhancement provides clarity to damaged tendons, ligaments Sept. 19, 2014 Ultrasound is a safe, affordable and noninvasive way to see internal structures, including the developing fetus. Ultrasound can also “see” other soft tissue — including tendons, which attach muscles to bone, and ligaments, which attach bone to bone. Ray Vanderby, a professor of biomedical engineering and orthopedics and rehabilitation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is commercializing an ultrasound method to analyze the condition of soft tissue.
  • Photo: Amy DeJong and Maya Warren Badger duo experiences an amazing summer on ‘The Amazing Race’ Sept. 19, 2014 Amy DeJong and Maya Warren had a truly epic summer, but they can't tell you about it.
  • Photo: Brandon Barton Dwindling wind may tip predator-prey balance Sept. 19, 2014 Bent and tossed by the wind, a field of soybean plants presents a challenge for an Asian lady beetle on the hunt for aphids. But what if the air - and the soybeans - were still?
  • Researchers study role of cultural diversity awareness in biomedical mentoring Sept. 18, 2014 The nation needs a more diverse biomedical workforce. To help advance that goal, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers will assess whether cultural-diversity training of research mentors makes a positive difference for those they are mentoring in biomedical research.
  • Helen Blackwell Researchers study vital 'on/off switches' that control when bacteria turn deadly Sept. 18, 2014 No matter how many times it’s demonstrated, it’s still hard to envision bacteria as social, communicating creatures. But by using a signaling system called “quorum sensing,” these single-celled organisms radically alter their behavior to suit their population. Helen Blackwell, a professor of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been making artificial compounds that mimic the natural quorum-sensing signals, including some that block a natural signal from binding to its protein target.
  • Photo: Person in PET scanner Down syndrome helps researchers understand Alzheimer’s disease Sept. 18, 2014 The link between a protein typically associated with Alzheimer's disease and its impact on memory and cognition may not be as clear as once thought, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Waisman Center. The findings are revealing more information about the earliest stages of the neurodegenerative disease.
  • Photo: Wendy Crone Crone set to guide Graduate School into new era Sept. 18, 2014 This past week, Interim Dean Wendy Crone took time to answer a few questions about the mission and priorities of the Graduate School in its new configuration.
  • Kenneth Cameron Project prepares collection for 21st-century challenge of invasive species Sept. 12, 2014 At the Wisconsin State Herbarium, director Kenneth Cameron is spearheading a new, three-year project to “digitize” images and data on aquatic and wetland plants, mollusks and fish from the Great Lakes basin. The $2.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation will also be disbursed to natural history museums at UW campuses in Stevens Point, Milwaukee and La Crosse, and in every other Great Lakes state. Together, these institutions expect to digitize 1.73 million specimens related to Great Lakes invasives.
  • Photo: Tour guide with group at GE Healthcare Blank GE Healthcare visit highlights partnerships in Milwaukee area Sept. 12, 2014 Chancellor Rebecca Blank is beginning her second year leading the University of Wisconsin–Madison much as she began her first year – by reaching out across the state to talk about the positive impact the state’s flagship university has throughout Wisconsin.
  • Photo: Richard Davidson Yogic breathing shows promise in reducing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder Sept. 11, 2014 One of the greatest casualties of war is its lasting effect on the minds of soldiers. This presents a daunting public health problem: More than 20 percent of veterans returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a 2012 report by RAND Corp.
  • Rebecca Blank Census Bureau Research Data Center to be established at UW–Madison Sept. 9, 2014 The potential for interdisciplinary research is about to expand considerably throughout the state of Wisconsin, thanks to Census Bureau approval for construction of a branch Research Data Center, or RDC, on the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus.
  • Neuron In directing stem cells, study shows context matters Sept. 8, 2014 In a new study, a team of researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison has added a new wrinkle to the cell differentiation equation, showing that the stiffness of the surfaces on which stem cells are grown can exert a profound influence on cell fate.
  • Prototype electric motor New motor under development by UW-Madison spinoff Sept. 8, 2014 A tabletop motor using an entirely new driving principle is under development at the headquarters of C-Motive Technologies, a startup business that is commercializing technology from the College of Engineering at UW-Madison.
  • Physical Sciences Lab PSL: Still making amazing instruments after all these years Sept. 4, 2014 A century ago, physicists used a tabletop “cloud chamber” to explore the motion of otherwise invisible particles. Today, they need giant machines to explore the bizarre frontiers of modern physics. And significant components of the most important modern physics experiments in China, Switzerland, the United States and the South Pole can trace their roots to a lab across the road from a cornfield near Stoughton, Wisconsin — the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Physical Sciences Laboratory, or PSL.
  • Sarah Mangelsdorf Campus does anything but cease in the summer Sept. 2, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison is host to boundless opportunities, happenings, changes and more — even when school’s out for the summer. Whether you were around to experience some of the new developments yourself, or taking a break from the everyday bustle of campus life, there was no shortage of activity at the university over the summer.
  • Soybean plants A touching story: The ancient conversation between plants, fungi and bacteria Aug. 27, 2014 The mechanical force that a single fungal cell or bacterial colony exerts on a plant cell may seem vanishingly small, but it plays a heavy role in setting up some of the most fundamental symbiotic relationships in biology. In fact, it may not be too much of a stretch to say that plants may have never moved onto land without the ability to respond to the touch of beneficial fungi, according to a new study led by Jean-Michel Ané, a professor of agronomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • Research and graduate education transition includes familiar, new faces Aug. 26, 2014 As UW-Madison’s research and graduate education programs begin an historic transition, there will be many familiar faces and a few new ones on the third floor of Bascom Hall.
  • Marsha Mailick Q & A Aug. 26, 2014 Marsha Mailick recently talked with University Communications’ Terry Devitt about the administrative changes to come, the experiences that have prepared her for her new role, and the challenges UW–Madison faces in the areas of research and graduate education.
  • Photo: Marsha Mailick No easy path, Mailick eager to take on one of university’s toughest jobs Aug. 26, 2014 If Marsha Mailick is at all intimidated by the prospect of taking on one of the hardest jobs on the UW-Madison campus, there is no hint of it in her demeanor, as she navigates the familiar territory of Bascom Hall.