Stories indexed under: Research

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  • Photo: Clear implantable medical sensor See-through sensors open new window into the brain Oct. 20, 2014 Developing invisible implantable medical sensor arrays, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has overcome a major technological hurdle in researchers’ efforts to understand the brain. The team described its technology, which has applications in fields ranging from neuroscience to cardiac care and even contact lenses, in the Oct. 20 issue of the online journal Nature Communications.
  • Photo: Francis Halzen UW physicist receives American Ingenuity Award for IceCube effort Oct. 17, 2014 Francis Halzen, the University of Wisconsin-Madison physicist who was the driving force behind the giant neutrino telescope known as IceCube at the South Pole, has been named a winner of the 2014 American Ingenuity Award.
  • Photo: Trisha Andrew UW-Madison chemist named Packard Fellow Oct. 16, 2014 Trisha Andrew, a University of Wisconsin-Madison assistant professor of chemistry, is one of 18 early career scientists from around the country named a Packard Fellow for Science and Engineering. The award includes a grant of $875,000 over five years to pursue research and is given in recognition of the potential significance of scholarship and innovation from the nation’s most promising young scientists and engineers.
  • Photo: Robert Mathieu with students WCER: Five decades of improving teaching and learning Oct. 16, 2014 One of the first centers of its kind, the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) is preparing to celebrate 50 years of educational policy research and initiatives.
  • UW to expand research into advanced, economically viable bioproducts Oct. 13, 2014 Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Minnesota and Argonne National Laboratory will explore ways to produce renewable plastic precursors and other substances from biomass with a recently announced $3.3 million grant from the United States Department of Energy.
  • Photo: Henslow’s Sparrow Balancing birds and biofuels: Grasslands support more species than cornfields Oct. 9, 2014 In Wisconsin, bioenergy is for the birds. Really. In a study published today in the journal PLOS ONE, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) scientists examined whether corn and perennial grassland fields in southern Wisconsin could provide both biomass for bioenergy production and bountiful bird habitat. The research team found that where there are grasslands, there are birds. Grass-and-wildflower-dominated fields supported more than three times as many bird species as cornfields, including 10 imperiled species found only in the grasslands.
  • Photo: Lee Wilke Company developing radio frequency technology to localize breast tumors Oct. 9, 2014 Breast cancer may inspire more public discussion, advocacy and charitable giving than almost any other disease besides HIV and AIDS. But people rarely talk about the specific experiences to which cancer patients are subjected.
  • Illustration: ESWN logo New nonprofit supports women in science Oct. 8, 2014 Tracey Holloway was a postdoctoral researcher at Columbia University in 2002, Ph.D. from Princeton University freshly in hand, when she and five colleagues teamed up to create an informal support network for other women in their field.
  • Photo: Yoshihiro Kawaoka Influenza researcher Yoshihiro Kawaoka wins Breakthrough Award Oct. 7, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison's Yoshihiro Kawaoka has been recognized as a 2014 Popular Mechanics Breakthrough Award recipient for his efforts to understand and prevent pandemic influenza.
  • Photo: Rebecca Blank ‘Bigger is better,’ Blank says in State of the University speech Oct. 7, 2014 After a year on campus, Chancellor Rebecca Blank says she has come to appreciate that the scope and breadth of the University of Wisconsin–Madison is what makes it a world-class university.
  • Photo: Pamela Kreeger With NIH New Innovator Award, engineer to study how ovarian cancer spreads Oct. 6, 2014 With approximately 22,000 diagnoses annually in the United States, ovarian cancer isn't among the most commonly occurring cancers. Yet, the mortality rate for women who have ovarian cancer hovers above 60 percent.
  • Photo: Marianne and Sheldon Lubar Lubar gift innovates to diversify Law School research Oct. 3, 2014 A $3 million gift will allow the University of Wisconsin Law School to support top legal scholars in a new and creative way, Dean Margaret Raymond announced today.
  • Photo: Satellite image of Hurricane Igor, taken by the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, September 13, 2010 CIMSS Tropical Cyclones Group to receive AMS Special Award Oct. 3, 2014 The Tropical Cyclones Group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) has been selected for an American Meteorological Society (AMS) Special Award.
  • Unique MOOC with in-person sessions offered for future and current college STEM faculty Oct. 1, 2014 A new MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) offering an in-person twist — local weekly facilitated meetings — debuts next week to help future and current college STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) faculty become better teachers. It is designed to be of special interest to grad students planning to teach professionally.
  • Photo: Lodgepole pine forest Mountain pine beetles get a bad rap for wildfires, study says Sept. 29, 2014 Mountain pine beetles get a bad rap, and understandably so. The grain-of-rice-sized insects are responsible for killing pine trees over tens of millions of acres in the Western U.S. and Canada over the last decade. But contrary to popular belief, these pests may not be to blame for more severe wildfires like those that have recently swept through the region. Instead, according to a new study by UW-Madison zoology professor Monica Turner, weather and topography play a greater role in the ecological severity of fires than these bark-boring beetles.
  • Graphic: File folders with arrow pointing toward laptop computer Electronic Lab Notebooks now available Sept. 23, 2014 Researchers have long relied on the venerable and trusted paper lab notebook for keeping an orderly record of research data, notes and experimental procedures. Soon, researchers on the UW-Madison campus will have a new option to store and organize these activities in the form of Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN) software services under a new UW contract with LabArchives.
  • Photo: Jonathan Patz Actions on climate change bring better health, study says Sept. 22, 2014 The number of extremely hot days in Eastern and Midwestern U.S. cities is projected to triple by mid-century, according to a new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers and published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
  • Ultrasound Ultrasound enhancement provides clarity to damaged tendons, ligaments Sept. 19, 2014 Ultrasound is a safe, affordable and noninvasive way to see internal structures, including the developing fetus. Ultrasound can also “see” other soft tissue — including tendons, which attach muscles to bone, and ligaments, which attach bone to bone. Ray Vanderby, a professor of biomedical engineering and orthopedics and rehabilitation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is commercializing an ultrasound method to analyze the condition of soft tissue.
  • Photo: Amy DeJong and Maya Warren Badger duo experiences an amazing summer on ‘The Amazing Race’ Sept. 19, 2014 Amy DeJong and Maya Warren had a truly epic summer, but they can't tell you about it.
  • Photo: Brandon Barton Dwindling wind may tip predator-prey balance Sept. 19, 2014 Bent and tossed by the wind, a field of soybean plants presents a challenge for an Asian lady beetle on the hunt for aphids. But what if the air - and the soybeans - were still?