Stories indexed under: Research

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  • Photo: Sea surface temperature data set Study models the past to understand the future of strengthening El Niño Nov. 26, 2014 El Niño is not a contemporary phenomenon; it’s long been the Earth’s dominant source of year-to-year climate fluctuation. But as the climate warms and the feedbacks that drive the cycle change, researchers want to know how El Niño will respond. A team of researchers led by the University of Wisconsin’s Zhengyu Liu will publish the latest findings in this quest Nov. 27 in Nature.
  • Photo: Sagittarius A black hole Telescopes hint at neutrino beacon at the heart of the Milky Way Nov. 26, 2014 Thanks to a confluence of data from a suite of vastly different telescopes, there are tantalizing clues that the massive black hole at the core of the Milky Way may be a cosmic accelerator. In a recent paper published in the journal Physical Review D, a team led by University of Wisconsin-Madison physicist Yang Bai reports a correlation of IceCube data with a recorded burst of X-rays from Sagittarius A, an object at the center of our galaxy that is believed to be a supermassive black hole.
  • Photo: Trisha Andrew Save power, make power: UW chemist confronts ambitious agenda with a brash laugh Nov. 25, 2014
  • Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Education (VCRGE) New Leadership Structure: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) Nov. 25, 2014 This FAQ has been developed by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Education (VCRGE) to answer questions regarding the reorganization and to provide an update on the progress that has occurred to date.
  • Photo: Melanoplus grasshopper Grasshoppers signal slow recovery of post-agricultural woodlands, study finds Nov. 24, 2014 New research by Philip Hahn and John Orrock at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on the recovery of South Carolina longleaf pine woodlands once used for cropland shows just how long lasting the legacy of agriculture can be in the recovery of natural places. By comparing grasshoppers found at woodland sites once used for agriculture to similar sites never disturbed by farming, Hahn and Orrock show that despite decades of recovery, the numbers and types of species found in each differ.
  • AAAS honors four UW-Madison professors for advancing science Nov. 24, 2014 Four members of the University of Wisconsin–Madison faculty have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the society announced today.
  • Photo: Michael Povlonis Satellite history at UW-Madison comes full circle with award Nov. 21, 2014 Michael Pavolonis thinks of himself as a volcano guy.
  • Photo: Yoshihiro Kawaoka Halting the hijacker: Cellular targets to thwart influenza virus infection Nov. 20, 2014 The influenza virus, like all viruses, is a hijacker. It quietly slips its way inside cells, steals the machinery inside to make more copies of itself, and then - having multiplied - bursts out of the cell to find others to infect.
  • Prematurity Awareness Month: Variation among preterm infants is the norm Nov. 19, 2014
  • Photo: Maurice Gattis Religious denominations friendly to same-sex marriage may protect gay youth from depression Nov. 19, 2014 Religious affiliation is generally a source of support, fostering resilience during difficult times. But religion doesn’t exactly have a reputation as a refuge for young gay people. That reputation may change for the better with new findings from researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario, and Sungkyunkwan University in Seoul, South Korea.
  • Crops play a major role in the annual CO2 cycle increase Nov. 19, 2014 In a study published Wednesday, Nov. 19, in Nature, scientists at Boston University, the University of New Hampshire, the University of Michigan, the University of Minnesota, the University of Wisconsin-Madison and McGill University show that a steep rise in the productivity of crops grown for food accounts for as much as 25 percent of the increase in this carbon dioxide (CO2) seasonality.
  • Photo: Barry Van Veen with sensors attached to head Imagination, reality flow in opposite directions in the brain Nov. 19, 2014 As real as that daydream may seem, its path through your brain runs opposite reality. Aiming to discern discrete neural circuits, researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison have tracked electrical activity in the brains of people who alternately imagined scenes or watched videos.
  • Photo: Lump of fool's gold Scientists get to the heart of fool's gold as a solar material Nov. 18, 2014 As the installation of photovoltaic solar cells continues to accelerate, scientists are looking for inexpensive materials beyond the traditional silicon that can efficiently convert sunlight into electricity.
  • Photo: Eunji Cho Violent television may make children more susceptible to advertising messages Nov. 18, 2014 A study by a University of Wisconsin-Madison journalism researcher has found that children who watch television shows with action or violence are more susceptible to messages in the advertisements shown during the programs.
  • Photo: David Vereide Morgridge scientists find way to ‘keep the lights on’ for cell self-renewal Nov. 13, 2014 One remarkable quality of pluripotent stem cells is they are immortal in the lab, able to divide and grow indefinitely under the right conditions. It turns out this ability also may exist further down the development path, with the workhorse progenitor cells responsible for creating specific tissues.
  • Collaboration yields new methods to treat tumors with antennas Nov. 7, 2014 A conversation with a University of Wisconsin-Madison neurosurgeon prompted two engineering researchers to challenge a commonly held idea about tumor ablation, and as a result, they're now working to commercialize a new technology that could yield less invasive radiation therapies for cancer patients.
  • Photo: Astronaut Reid Wiseman injects a fixative solution onto the seedlings. UW team’s plants return to Earth after growing in space Nov. 6, 2014 Researchers at Simon Gilroy's lab in the Department of Botany at the University of Wisconsin-Madison expect to greet a truck this afternoon that is carrying small containers holding more than 1,000 frozen plants that germinated and grew aboard the International Space Station.
  • Search committee seeks team builder as next Graduate School dean Nov. 6, 2014 The search for the next dean of the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Graduate School is officially underway.
  • Greater use of social media gets science, scientists noticed, study says Nov. 6, 2014 In September, a group of UW-Madison professors and their colleagues published a study in the journal Journalism & Mass Communications Quarterly showing a connection between “h-index” — a measure of the quality of a researcher’s work and influence — and whether the scientists interact with reporters and get mentioned on Twitter.
  • Photo: Katie Brenner UW-Madison scientist receives award to save babies, a diaper at a time Nov. 6, 2014 She woke up in her hospital room feeling nothing short of desperation. Katie Brenner remembered giving birth to a tiny daughter hours earlier but the doctors and nurses had whisked the preterm infant away for care. She hadn’t seen little Ruthie since. “I want to meet my daughter,” the normally polite Brenner demanded of the hospital staff. Her little girl is now a healthy 6-year-old and for that, Brenner is thankful. But she knows the story ends much differently for too many families. Doing something about it has inspired her scientific career.