Stories indexed under: Psychology

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  • Photo: infant rhesus monkey at the Harlow Center, taken by the Coe Lab. Hair from infants gives clues about their life in the womb April 15, 2014 Like rings of a tree, hair can reveal a lot of information about the past.
  • Photo: Janet Hyde Study challenges claims of single-sex schooling benefits Feb. 3, 2014 As many American public schools adopt single-sex classrooms and even entire schools, a new study finds scant evidence that they offer educational or social benefits.
  • Photo: even and odd tiles on shutbox Even or odd: no easy feat for the mind Dec. 20, 2013 Even scientists are fond of thinking of the human brain as a computer, following sets of rules to communicate, make decisions and find a meal.
  • Photo: Bob Enright Forgiveness perfect gift for the holidays Dec. 18, 2013 If you want your holidays to be happier, Professor Robert Enright suggests giving the gift of forgiveness. While it is helpful any time of the year, it can be especially welcome during the holidays.
  • Photo: Jamie Hanson Poverty influences children’s early brain development Dec. 11, 2013 Poverty may have direct implications for important, early steps in the development of the brain, saddling children of low-income families with slower rates of growth in two key brain structures, according to researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
  • Image: brain sections Brain pathways tie together mental maps Sept. 16, 2013 To find its way in the world, your brain has to decipher a set of directions muddled by different points of view.
  • Lupyan Language can reveal the invisible, study shows Aug. 26, 2013 It is natural to imagine that the sense of sight takes in the world as it is - simply passing on what the eyes collect from light reflected by the objects around us.
  • Photo: Seth Pollak Hormones may usher abused girls into early adulthood July 19, 2013 During the sort of tense situation that makes palms sweat and voices quaver, children and young adults are typically awash in cortisol, a stress hormone that sounds an alarm and prepares the body for fight-or-flight responses to danger.
  • Facebook profiles raise users’ self-esteem and affect behavior May 31, 2013 A Facebook profile is an ideal version of self, full of photos and posts curated for the eyes of family, friends and acquaintances. A new study shows that this version of self can provide beneficial psychological effects and influence behavior.
  • Passionate, student-focused psychology instructor Hendricks dies March 12, 2013 Bryan Hendricks, who became a student favorite during 12 years as an instructor in the University of Wisconsin–Madison Psychology Department, died Friday morning at age 66 following an illness that had recently forced his retirement.
  • Facebook users browse their own profiles to boost egos Feb. 6, 2013 Lousy day at work or a bad grade on an exam? New research suggests people feeling deflated seek solace in their Facebook profiles to puff themselves up.
  • Psychology prof studies what’s behind candidates’ smiles Oct. 22, 2012 As she was watching the first presidential debate, psychology Professor Paula Niedenthal couldn't help but notice something odd about Barack Obama's smile.
  • Photo: Toddler boy with pacifier Pacifiers may have emotional consequences for boys Sept. 18, 2012 Pacifiers may stunt the emotional development of baby boys by robbing them of the opportunity to try on facial expressions during infancy.
  • Stress breaks loops that hold short-term memory together Sept. 13, 2012 Stress has long been pegged as the enemy of attention, disrupting focus and doing substantial damage to working memory - the short-term juggling of information that allows us to do all the little things that make us productive.
  • Study pinpoints Ritalin’s influence Jan. 5, 2012 Millions of individuals diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are helped by methylphenidate, the stimulant better known as Ritalin. Now researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have pinpointed the area of the brain in which Ritalin does its work.
  • Psychologist to explain 3-D perception to National Geographic audience Oct. 7, 2011 Bas Rokers, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will illustrate how our brains process visual motion and depth during the three-part National Geographic television series "Brain Games."
  • Study: Advantages of single-sex schooling a myth Sept. 22, 2011 As Madison deals with a proposal to establish a single-sex charter school, a University of Wisconsin–Madison professor of psychology is one author of an article that calls the scientific case for single-sex schools "pseudoscience."
  • Forum considers human consciousness April 20, 2011 The 10th annual International Bioethics Forum, Manifesting the Mind, will explore perspectives on human consciousness at its two-day symposium April 28-29.
  • Noted primate researcher to discuss animal research March 25, 2011 On Tuesday, March 29, University of Wisconsin-Madison psychology professor Charles Snowdon will discuss his decades of research on a small new-world monkey called the cotton-top tamarin.
  • New perspective diminishes racial bias in pain treatment March 7, 2011 Years of research show black patients getting less treatment in the American health care system than their white counterparts, but a new study suggests that a quick dose of empathy helps close racial gaps in pain treatment.