Stories indexed under: Milestones

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  • Photo: Trisha Andrew UW-Madison chemist named Packard Fellow Oct. 16, 2014 Trisha Andrew, a University of Wisconsin-Madison assistant professor of chemistry, is one of 18 early career scientists from around the country named a Packard Fellow for Science and Engineering. The award includes a grant of $875,000 over five years to pursue research and is given in recognition of the potential significance of scholarship and innovation from the nation’s most promising young scientists and engineers.
  • Photo: Robert Mathieu with students WCER: Five decades of improving teaching and learning Oct. 16, 2014 One of the first centers of its kind, the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) is preparing to celebrate 50 years of educational policy research and initiatives.
  • Photo: WARF logo WARF grants more than $70 million to support UW-Madison Oct. 14, 2014 The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), the nonprofit foundation that helps steward the cycle of research, discovery, commercialization and investment at UW–Madison, has granted the university $59 million for the 2014-2015 fiscal year.
  • Photo: Home economics education major teaching high school students Class of ’64 returns for half-century reunion Oct. 9, 2014 According to Joan Lappin, there were eight things women were allowed to be when she graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1964: school teacher, bank teller, secretary, stewardess, librarian, department store buyer, nurse and social worker.
  • Photo: Haley Laundrie UW-Madison student represents state as Miss Wisconsin USA Oct. 8, 2014 At first glance, UW-Madison junior Haley Laundrie may seem like your typical college student. The 20-year-old from Lake Mills, Wisconsin, studies communication arts and legal studies, works with the Wisconsin Business World, a summer business camp for high school students, and volunteers for UW-Madison’s chapter of Best Buddies, which connects students with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Outside of the classroom, however, Laundrie represents the state as Miss Wisconsin USA.
  • Seven international centers at UW-Madison to share $3.4 million in federal grants Oct. 7, 2014 Seven area and international studies centers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison will receive more than $3.4 million in federal Title VI grants for the 2014-15 academic year under the National Resource Centers (NRC) and Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships programs, administered by the U.S. Department of Education. According to the department, UW-Madison has been awarded $1,641,580 for NRCs and $1,776,000 for FLAS scholarships for 2014. Over the four-year cycle of these awards, the university stands to receive nearly $13.7 million through 2018.
  • Alt: Collegiate Inventors Competition Two UW student teams named finalists in national inventors competition Oct. 3, 2014 Two University of Wisconsin-Madison undergraduate teams are among only seven finalists for the 2014 National Collegiate Inventors Competition, which honors the latest in student creativity and innovation.
  • Photo: Wisconsin Science Festival Phi Beta Kappa Society recognizes Wisconsin Science Festival Sept. 30, 2014
  • Photo: Climate Quest logo Winning climate change solutions range from meat processing to mindfulness Sept. 30, 2014 The Climate Quest competition to spur innovative climate change solutions is down to a field of five. At the Climate Quest Concept Pitch on Sept. 19, 18 teams presented their ideas to a panel of investors and entrepreneurs, who rated the ideas on many factors including creativity, scalability and potential impact. The panel selected five teams to advance to the next round of the competition.
  • Ray Owen In memoriam: Ray D. Owen discovered immune tolerance, paved the way for organ transplantation Sept. 26, 2014 Ray D. Owen, who died on Sept. 21 in Pasadena, California, at the age of 98, discovered the phenomenon of immune tolerance, fueling a revolution in immunology and laying the foundation for the successful transplantation of human organs. Owen left Madison in 1947 to join the faculty at Caltech, where he remained for the rest of his long, distinguished career. His later work included studies on human antibodies, blood-group antigens, and the evolution of immune systems.
  • Sept. 25, 2014
  • William Cronon Environmental historian William Cronon awarded Wilderness Society’s highest honor Sept. 25, 2014 Environmental historian and University of Wisconsin-Madison professor William Cronon has been presented with The Wilderness Society’s Robert Marshall Award — the organization’s highest civilian honor — for his contributions to the protection of America’s wild places. The award, named for wilderness visionary Robert Marshall, is given to a private citizen who has made outstanding, long-term contributions to conservation and fostering an American land ethic.
  • Sharon Dickey Mainstay clerk celebrates 50 years of reliability at UW Hospital Sept. 9, 2014 The Neurosciences ICU on the fourth floor of the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics is normally a hushed and darkened spot. It’s kept that way for the comfort of patients, who have recently survived brain surgery, stroke or some manner of head trauma. But on a Thursday in May, there was an uncharacteristic party going in the employee break room. It was a celebration of health unit clerk Sharon Dickey’s 50th anniversary at the hospital.
  • Nelson named UW CIO chief of staff Sept. 3, 2014 Don Nelson has been named chief of staff for the Office of Vice Provost for Information Technology and CIO at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Nelson has been the Director of State Relations for the UW for the past six years. - See more at: http://www.doit.wisc.edu/news/nelson-named-uw-cio-chief-staff/#sthash.8567EjlX.dpuf
  • Sarah Mangelsdorf Campus does anything but cease in the summer Sept. 2, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison is host to boundless opportunities, happenings, changes and more — even when school’s out for the summer. Whether you were around to experience some of the new developments yourself, or taking a break from the everyday bustle of campus life, there was no shortage of activity at the university over the summer.
  • Research and graduate education transition includes familiar, new faces Aug. 26, 2014 As UW-Madison’s research and graduate education programs begin an historic transition, there will be many familiar faces and a few new ones on the third floor of Bascom Hall.
  • Waclaw Szybalski Legend in genetics at forefront of book about heroism during 20th century's darkest hours Aug. 20, 2014 Waclaw Szybalski, 92, a genius of genetics who has been repeatedly mentioned as a candidate for the Nobel Prize, grew up as an aspiring scientist during World War II in the eastern part of Poland. Many of Szybalski's most significant wartime roles concerned a decidedly applied type of science: He cooked TNT so the Polish resistance could sabotage rail lines. He participated in smuggling typhus vaccine to Jews in the Warsaw Ghetto. And he fed lice and supervised "louse feeders."
  • Ken Cameron Herbarium director receives award for telling the story of plants Aug. 19, 2014 Ken Cameron, director of the Wisconsin State Herbarium, received the Peter Raven Award from the American Society of Plant Taxonomists Aug. 5. Cameron, also a professor of botany at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is a world expert on the orchid family.
  • Photo: Martin Cadwallader at table being interviewed After 13 years, Cadwallader steps down from top research post Aug. 19, 2014 In 1990, when first appointed as an associate dean in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Graduate School, geographer Martin Cadwallader had no idea what was over the horizon. Twenty-four years later, after rising through the leadership ranks and serving for 13 years as dean of the Graduate School and vice chancellor for research, Cadwallader prepares to step down from one of the university’s most critical posts. At the end of August he willreturn to the faculty and a cherished role as teacher and scholar.
  • Photo: Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory McKenna to retire from Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory Aug. 8, 2014 They say blood is thicker than water. So much so, that even the volume of water in all of Madison's lakes is still too thin for Thomas McKenna, director of the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (WVDL). After seven years in the role, he is officially retiring from the lab and moving to Massachusetts to be closer to his grown daughters.