Stories indexed under: Health

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  • Annual rankings rate health of Wisconsin counties March 25, 2015 Ozaukee County ranks healthiest in Wisconsin and Menominee County ranks least healthy, according to the sixth annual County Health Rankings, released today by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute.
  • Photo: William Murphy Researchers aim to broaden understanding of how toxins affect the body March 25, 2015 Even in an era in which there is increased emphasis on living "green," humans are constantly exposed to a wide range of toxins in everything from our air, food and water to the goods we buy.
  • Photo: Christian Capitini UW to test ‘breakthrough’ pediatric leukemia treatment Feb. 24, 2015 A promising method of immunotherapy to treat children with relapsed acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is opening at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and American Family Children's Hospital. The trial is open to relapsed/refractory pediatric ALL patients who have limited treatment options.
  • Zoo's mother-to-be receives prenatal care from UW-affiliated health professionals Feb. 18, 2015 While many in Madison were surprised and delighted on Feb. 10 to learn that Henry Vilas Zoo’s Bornean orangutan, Kawan, was expecting the zoo’s first baby primate in 14 years, it was old news to Barb Trampe, chief sonographer at the UW/Meriter Center for Perinatal Care. She had already seen the first baby pictures.
  • Photo: Su-Chun Zhang supervising his lab Laying a foundation for treating ALS, spinal cord injury Feb. 2, 2015 Su-Chun Zhang, a professor of neuroscience and neurology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Waisman Center, and his research team have published a unique model for learning more about the role of human astrocytes today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation today. The findings may lay a foundation for the treatment of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) and debilitating spinal cord injuries.
  • ‘Kindness curriculum’ boosts school success in preschoolers Jan. 23, 2015
  • Will they be back? Predicting readmissions for elderly patients Dec. 22, 2014 Seniors living in the most disadvantaged 15 percent of U.S. neighborhoods are much more likely to make repeat trips to the hospital, according to a study by Amy Kind, a University of Wisconsin-Madison assistant professor of medicine.
  • Wisconsin's health: Significant gaps by race, income, geography Dec. 16, 2014 A new report by researchers at the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute reveals that while some trends in the health of Wisconsin residents are positive, this progress is not shared by all residents of the state.
  • Photo: Yoshihiro Kawaoka Halting the hijacker: Cellular targets to thwart influenza virus infection Nov. 20, 2014 The influenza virus, like all viruses, is a hijacker. It quietly slips its way inside cells, steals the machinery inside to make more copies of itself, and then - having multiplied - bursts out of the cell to find others to infect.
  • Prematurity Awareness Month: Variation among preterm infants is the norm Nov. 19, 2014
  • Study shows possible link between asthma, cardiovascular disease Nov. 17, 2014 Asthma that requires daily medication is associated with a significantly higher risk of heart attack or stroke, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (SMPH).
  • Photo: William Busse Largest grant ever awarded to UW School of Medicine and Public Health will continue inner-city asthma research Nov. 10, 2014 The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (SMPH) a seven-year, $70 million grant for its continuing work on the Inner-City Asthma Consortium (ICAC) - a nationwide clinical research network to evaluate and develop promising new immune-based treatments. The goal of the work is to reduce the severity of asthma in inner-city children, and to lead research efforts into preventing this disease.
  • Photo: Katie Brenner UW-Madison scientist receives award to save babies, a diaper at a time Nov. 6, 2014 She woke up in her hospital room feeling nothing short of desperation. Katie Brenner remembered giving birth to a tiny daughter hours earlier but the doctors and nurses had whisked the preterm infant away for care. She hadn’t seen little Ruthie since. “I want to meet my daughter,” the normally polite Brenner demanded of the hospital staff. Her little girl is now a healthy 6-year-old and for that, Brenner is thankful. But she knows the story ends much differently for too many families. Doing something about it has inspired her scientific career.
  • UW sleep scientists win $7.7 million grant to study "local" sleep Nov. 5, 2014 The mystery of how some parts of some animals’ brains can sleep while they are awake – and whether the phenomenon occurs in humans -- will be studied in depth thanks to a large center grant from the National Institutes of Health.
  • UW-Madison awarded $8.3 million for new urological research center Oct. 28, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison has been awarded an $8.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to create a research center focused on urological health. The George O’Brien Center at UW-Madison is a collaboration with the University of Massachusetts-Boston to enhance the diagnosis and treatment of male urinary symptoms associated with hormones, aging, obesity and benign prostate enlargement.
  • Although risk is low, UW-Madison exercises Ebola preparedness Oct. 23, 2014 With the first cases of Ebola diagnosed in the U.S., questions have arisen regarding the risk to the campus community and the preparedness of the university should an event occur. For the past four months, UW-Madison and University Health Services (UHS) officials have actively planned for the possibility of an Ebola case on campus and monitored university international travel, while keeping in mind the diverse needs of the campus community.
  • UW to serve as national hub for mentor training as part of diversity consortium Oct. 22, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison will serve as a national hub for research mentor and mentee training for the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) recently announced by NIH as part of a national Diversity Program Consortium. The NIH will award the Diversity Program Consortium nearly $31 million in fiscal year 2014 funds to develop new approaches that engage researchers, including those from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical sciences, and prepare them to thrive in the NIH-funded workforce.
  • Photo: Lee Wilke Company developing radio frequency technology to localize breast tumors Oct. 9, 2014 Breast cancer may inspire more public discussion, advocacy and charitable giving than almost any other disease besides HIV and AIDS. But people rarely talk about the specific experiences to which cancer patients are subjected.
  • Photo: Pamela Kreeger With NIH New Innovator Award, engineer to study how ovarian cancer spreads Oct. 6, 2014 With approximately 22,000 diagnoses annually in the United States, ovarian cancer isn't among the most commonly occurring cancers. Yet, the mortality rate for women who have ovarian cancer hovers above 60 percent.
  • Actions on climate change bring better health, study says Sept. 22, 2014 The number of extremely hot days in Eastern and Midwestern U.S. cities is projected to triple by mid-century, according to a new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers and published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.