Stories indexed under: Health

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  • Photo: Yoshihiro Kawaoka Halting the hijacker: Cellular targets to thwart influenza virus infection Nov. 20, 2014 The influenza virus, like all viruses, is a hijacker. It quietly slips its way inside cells, steals the machinery inside to make more copies of itself, and then - having multiplied - bursts out of the cell to find others to infect.
  • Prematurity Awareness Month: Variation among preterm infants is the norm Nov. 19, 2014
  • Study shows possible link between asthma, cardiovascular disease Nov. 17, 2014 Asthma that requires daily medication is associated with a significantly higher risk of heart attack or stroke, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (SMPH).
  • Photo: William Busse Largest grant ever awarded to UW School of Medicine and Public Health will continue inner-city asthma research Nov. 10, 2014 The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (SMPH) a seven-year, $70 million grant for its continuing work on the Inner-City Asthma Consortium (ICAC) - a nationwide clinical research network to evaluate and develop promising new immune-based treatments. The goal of the work is to reduce the severity of asthma in inner-city children, and to lead research efforts into preventing this disease.
  • Photo: Katie Brenner UW-Madison scientist receives award to save babies, a diaper at a time Nov. 6, 2014 She woke up in her hospital room feeling nothing short of desperation. Katie Brenner remembered giving birth to a tiny daughter hours earlier but the doctors and nurses had whisked the preterm infant away for care. She hadn’t seen little Ruthie since. “I want to meet my daughter,” the normally polite Brenner demanded of the hospital staff. Her little girl is now a healthy 6-year-old and for that, Brenner is thankful. But she knows the story ends much differently for too many families. Doing something about it has inspired her scientific career.
  • UW sleep scientists win $7.7 million grant to study "local" sleep Nov. 5, 2014 The mystery of how some parts of some animals’ brains can sleep while they are awake – and whether the phenomenon occurs in humans -- will be studied in depth thanks to a large center grant from the National Institutes of Health.
  • UW-Madison awarded $8.3 million for new urological research center Oct. 28, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison has been awarded an $8.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to create a research center focused on urological health. The George O’Brien Center at UW-Madison is a collaboration with the University of Massachusetts-Boston to enhance the diagnosis and treatment of male urinary symptoms associated with hormones, aging, obesity and benign prostate enlargement.
  • Although risk is low, UW-Madison exercises Ebola preparedness Oct. 23, 2014 With the first cases of Ebola diagnosed in the U.S., questions have arisen regarding the risk to the campus community and the preparedness of the university should an event occur. For the past four months, UW-Madison and University Health Services (UHS) officials have actively planned for the possibility of an Ebola case on campus and monitored university international travel, while keeping in mind the diverse needs of the campus community.
  • UW to serve as national hub for mentor training as part of diversity consortium Oct. 22, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison will serve as a national hub for research mentor and mentee training for the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) recently announced by NIH as part of a national Diversity Program Consortium. The NIH will award the Diversity Program Consortium nearly $31 million in fiscal year 2014 funds to develop new approaches that engage researchers, including those from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical sciences, and prepare them to thrive in the NIH-funded workforce.
  • Photo: Lee Wilke Company developing radio frequency technology to localize breast tumors Oct. 9, 2014 Breast cancer may inspire more public discussion, advocacy and charitable giving than almost any other disease besides HIV and AIDS. But people rarely talk about the specific experiences to which cancer patients are subjected.
  • Photo: Pamela Kreeger With NIH New Innovator Award, engineer to study how ovarian cancer spreads Oct. 6, 2014 With approximately 22,000 diagnoses annually in the United States, ovarian cancer isn't among the most commonly occurring cancers. Yet, the mortality rate for women who have ovarian cancer hovers above 60 percent.
  • Actions on climate change bring better health, study says Sept. 22, 2014 The number of extremely hot days in Eastern and Midwestern U.S. cities is projected to triple by mid-century, according to a new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers and published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
  • Researchers study role of cultural diversity awareness in biomedical mentoring Sept. 18, 2014 The nation needs a more diverse biomedical workforce. To help advance that goal, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers will assess whether cultural-diversity training of research mentors makes a positive difference for those they are mentoring in biomedical research.
  • Seasonal flu shots available soon for UW students, employees Sept. 17, 2014 Flu season will soon be upon us and every year, UW-Madison sees its share of influenza. University Health Services (UHS) strongly recommends that all students, faculty and staff get their flu shot. It's the single best protection against the flu.
  • Photo: Richard Davidson Yogic breathing shows promise in reducing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder Sept. 11, 2014 One of the greatest casualties of war is its lasting effect on the minds of soldiers. This presents a daunting public health problem: More than 20 percent of veterans returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a 2012 report by RAND Corp.
  • New 'BREATHE' study will help residents quit smoking July 14, 2014 The University of Wisconsin Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention (UW-CTRI) has received a new $12 million grant from the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute to help patients in the Milwaukee and Madison areas quit smoking.
  • Photo: Igor Slukvin Wisconsin scientists find genetic recipe to turn stem cells to blood July 14, 2014 The ability to reliably and safely make in the laboratory all of the different types of cells in human blood is one key step closer to reality. Writing today (July 14, 2014) in the journal Nature Communications, a group led by University of Wisconsin-Madison stem cell researcher Igor Slukvin reports the discovery of two genetic programs responsible for taking blank-slate stem cells and turning them into both red and the array of white cells that make up human blood.
  • University Health Services selects new prevention director July 11, 2014 Jeanette Kowalik has been named the new director of prevention services and campus health initiatives at University Health Services (UHS), the student health clinic of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • UW, Madison schools team up to train mindfulness muscles July 1, 2014 Mindfulness practice in the classroom may be one way to help students improve their academic performance, nurture their emotional well-being and bolster their behavior.
  • Photo: a researcher splits and redistributes cells at the Influenza Research Institute Genes found in nature yield 1918-like virus with pandemic potential June 11, 2014 An international team of researchers has shown that circulating avian influenza viruses contain all the genetic ingredients necessary to underpin the emergence of a virus similar to the deadly 1918 influenza virus.