Stories indexed under: Ecology

Total: 39   RSSRSS feed

  • Photo: Henslow’s Sparrow Balancing birds and biofuels: Grasslands support more species than cornfields Oct. 9, 2014 In Wisconsin, bioenergy is for the birds. Really. In a study published today in the journal PLOS ONE, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) scientists examined whether corn and perennial grassland fields in southern Wisconsin could provide both biomass for bioenergy production and bountiful bird habitat. The research team found that where there are grasslands, there are birds. Grass-and-wildflower-dominated fields supported more than three times as many bird species as cornfields, including 10 imperiled species found only in the grasslands.
  • Next wave of research: Ecology, super-sized May 20, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison, home of pioneering ecologists who studied lakes, forests, wetlands and prairies, is playing a key role in the next wave of ecological research: large teams of scientists confronting the dilemma of a changing climate on a shrinking planet.
  • Photo: Aldo Leopold Madison Reads Leopold set for Saturday at UW Arboretum Feb. 27, 2014 The UW Arboretum's ninth annual Madison Reads Leopold event anchors the celebration of Aldo Leopold Weekend in the Madison area with a mix of citizen and celebrity readers giving voice to Leopold's "A Sand County Almanac."
  • Photo: Ellen Damschen Seed dispersal gets a test in carved-out ‘habitat corridors’ Feb. 24, 2014 Field ecologists go to great lengths to get data: radio collars and automatic video cameras are only two of their creative techniques for documenting the natural world. So when a group of ecologists set out to see how wind moves seeds through isolated patches of habitat carved into a longleaf pine plantation in South Carolina, they twisted colored yarn to create mock seeds that would drift with the wind much like native seeds.
  • Maps: biodiversity impact of development and cropping policies Study puts freshwater biodiversity on the map Oct. 16, 2013 When it comes to economic growth and environmental impacts, it can seem like Newton's third law of motion is the rule - for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction - and that in most cases, the economy prospers and the environment suffers.
  • Photo: automated sensor Scientists find early warning indicators of major ecological change Oct. 7, 2013 Day after day, the buoy bobbed at the surface of Peter Lake. Every five minutes, or 288 times a day, instruments in the water silently recorded samples without creating so much as a ripple. But, beneath the surface, the lake - just across Wisconsin's northern boundary in Michigan's Upper Peninsula - was in turmoil. The buoy was busy documenting massive change.
  • Photo: Jiangxiao Qiu Ecologists map the benefits of our ecosystems July 1, 2013 Two ecologists at the University of Wisconsin–Madison report this week (July 1) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences a novel approach to analyzing the production and location of 10 different ecosystem services across a landscape, opening the door to being able to identify factors governing their synergies and tradeoffs.
  • In the eastern U.S., spring flowers keep pace with warming climate Jan. 16, 2013 Using the meticulous phenological records of two iconic American naturalists, Henry David Thoreau and Aldo Leopold, scientists have demonstrated that native plants in the eastern United States are flowering as much as a month earlier in response to a warming climate.
  • Aldo Leopold's field notes score a lost "soundscape" Sept. 18, 2012 Among his many qualities, the pioneering wildlife ecologist Aldo Leopold was a meticulous taker of field notes.
  • Mathematical ecologist wins prestigious award July 30, 2012 University of Wisconsin-Madison ecologist Anthony Ives is being recognized with the prestigious Robert H. MacArthur Award from the Ecological Society of America (ESA).
  • Forest ecologist receives distinguished award May 16, 2012 David Mladenoff, the Beers-Bascom Professor in Conservation in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, has received the 2012 Distinguished Landscape Ecologist Award.
  • Report assesses climate change impacts, adaptation strategies Feb. 7, 2011 A statewide collaborative of scientists and diverse stakeholders is proposing a multitude of measures to help protect and enhance Wisconsin's natural resources, economic vitality, and public well-being as the state's climate becomes warmer and wetter.
  • Photo: Madison lakes Water, water everywhere focus of new sustainability project Jan. 6, 2011 An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is turning a comprehensive lens on Madison's water in all its forms - in the lakes, streets, faucets, ground and atmosphere - thanks to the National Science Foundation.
  • Photo: Greene Prairie, UW Arboretum Plant family tree may help identify species vulnerable to invaders, climate change Oct. 18, 2010 Change has been the norm for Wisconsin's forests over the last 50 years, and the next 50 are unlikely to pass quietly.
  • Bioenergy choices could dramatically change Midwest bird diversity Oct. 4, 2010 Ambitious plans to expand acreage of bioenergy crops could have a major impact on birds in the Upper Midwest, according to a study published today (Oct. 4) in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
  • New book explores widespread, troubling legacy of synthetic chemicals March 4, 2010 Environmental historian Nancy Langston started her latest book planning to highlight the lasting legacy of manufactured chemicals that touched the lives of millions of Americans in the 1950s and 1960s.
  • Scissor-tailed flycatcher Migratory birds bear brunt of climate-charged weather Jan. 11, 2010 As global climate change fuels more frequent and intense hurricanes and droughts, migratory birds, especially those whose populations are already in decline, will bear the brunt of such climate-fueled weather, suggest a pair of new studies.
  • Portion of map Conservation areas threatened nationally by housing development Dec. 28, 2009 Conservationists have long known that lines on a map are not sufficient to protect nature because what happens outside those boundaries can affect what happens within. Now, a study by two University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists in the department of forest and wildlife ecology measures the threat of housing development around protected areas in the United States.
  • Surveying bird biodiversity from space? Dec. 16, 2009 A fundamental rule of wildlife ecology says that diverse habitats foster greater biodiversity: The Amazon has far more species than Greenland. But how do habitat and biodiversity relate in a state like Wisconsin, with its range of farms, forests, wetlands, cities, suburbs and highways?
  • Aspen trees Greenhouse gas carbon dioxide ramps up aspen growth Dec. 4, 2009 The rising level of atmospheric carbon dioxide may be fueling more than climate change. It could also be making some trees grow like crazy.