Stories indexed under: Chemistry

Total: 90   RSSRSS feed

  • Helen Blackwell Researchers study vital 'on/off switches' that control when bacteria turn deadly Sept. 18, 2014 No matter how many times it’s demonstrated, it’s still hard to envision bacteria as social, communicating creatures. But by using a signaling system called “quorum sensing,” these single-celled organisms radically alter their behavior to suit their population. Helen Blackwell, a professor of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been making artificial compounds that mimic the natural quorum-sensing signals, including some that block a natural signal from binding to its protein target.
  • Neuron In directing stem cells, study shows context matters Sept. 8, 2014 In a new study, a team of researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison has added a new wrinkle to the cell differentiation equation, showing that the stiffness of the surfaces on which stem cells are grown can exert a profound influence on cell fate.
  • Manos Mavrikakis Water’s reaction with metal oxides opens doors for researchers Aug. 8, 2014 A multi-institutional team has resolved a long-unanswered question about how two of the world’s most common substances interact. In a paper published recently in the journal Nature Communications, Manos Mavrikakis, professor of chemical and biological engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and his collaborators report fundamental discoveries about how water reacts with metal oxides
  • Photo: Shakhashiri fireworks demonstration ‘Science is fun’ offers traditional July Fourth show July 1, 2014 Chemist and stage master Bassam Shakhashiri will present “Science and Fireworks: Sights and Sounds for Independence Day,” on the Memorial Union Terrace July 4.
  • Photo: Sam Gellman Chemical strategy hints at better drugs for osteoporosis, diabetes June 16, 2014 By swapping replacement parts into the backbone of a synthetic hormone, UW-Madison graduate student Ross Cheloha and his mentor Sam Gellman, along with collaborators at Harvard Medical School, have built a version of a parathyroid hormone that resists degradation in laboratory mice. As a result, the altered hormone can stay around longer - and at much higher concentration, says Gellman, professor of chemistry at the UW.
  • Photo: Jordan Schmidt UW–Madison chemist wins young teacher-scholar award June 10, 2014 Jordan Schmidt, assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, is one of 15 young researchers to win prestigious 2014 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar awards.
  • Photo: reactor in window Lighting up the lab: Team harnesses light for controlled chemical reaction April 24, 2014 When chemist Tehshik Yoon looks out his office window, he sees a source of energy to drive chemical reactions. Plants “learned” to synthesize chemicals with sunlight eons ago; Yoon came to the field a bit more recently. But this week, in the journal Science, he and three collaborators detail a way to use sunlight and two catalysts to create molecules that are difficult to make with conventional techniques — a finding that may eventually have implications for drug making and materials science.
  • Photo: Kyoung-Shin Choi New, inexpensive production materials boost promise of hydrogen fuel Feb. 21, 2014 Generating electricity is not the only way to turn sunlight into energy we can use on demand. The sun can also drive reactions to create chemical fuels, such as hydrogen, that can in turn power cars, trucks and trains.
  • Photo: Joshua Shutter Prolific chemistry student wins Churchill Scholarship Feb. 4, 2014 As a child, Joshua Shutter's introduction to chemistry came through library books, learning to make rock candy and bottle rockets.
  • Photo: Rika Khadria Grad student’s proteins cut a rug, win ‘Dance Your Ph.D.’ competition Jan. 14, 2014 Graduate school research can get long and tricky and complex beyond the easy understanding even of your fellow grad students. Unless it has a beat, that is, and you can dance to it.
  • Photo: Martin Zanni New look identifies crucial clumping of diabetes-causing proteins Nov. 11, 2013 People get type 2 diabetes. So do cats. But rats don’t, and neither do dogs. Subtle differences in the shape of proteins protect some and endanger others.
  • Photo: Bassam Shakhashiri UW-Madison chemist named ‘Friend of Education’ Sept. 27, 2013 Bassam Shakhashiri, known far and wide for his annual holiday season exhibitions of chemistry, has been named a "Friend of Education" by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.
  • Photo: catalytic converter Researchers capture speedy chemical reaction in mid-stride Sept. 13, 2013 In synthetic chemistry, making the best possible use of the needed ingredients is key to optimizing high-quality production at the lowest possible cost.
  • Photo: Bill Banholzer Retired Dow exec joins UW, will focus on innovation Sept. 6, 2013 An industry executive who has spent his entire career translating inventions into products that are both profitable and beneficial to society has joined the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • Photo: Jen Kaiser boarding plane Delving into a climate puzzle with the push of a button July 10, 2013 As University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate student Jen Kaiser settles into life in Smyrna, Tenn., this summer, her days develop a rhythm. She wakes up early, checks the weather forecast, and heads to Sewart Air Force Base.
  • Photo: Mark Lukowski New catalyst could cut cost of making hydrogen fuel July 2, 2013 A discovery at the University of Wisconsin-Madison may represent a significant advance in the quest to create a "hydrogen economy" that would use this abundant element to store and transfer energy.
  • Diamond catalyst shows promise in breaching age-old barrier June 30, 2013 In the world, there are a lot of small molecules people would like to get rid of, or at least convert to something useful, according to University of Wisconsin-Madison chemist Robert J. Hamers.
  • Photo: Bassam Shakhashiri at Union Terrace "Science is Fun" offers two shows in July June 27, 2013 Chemist and stage-master Bassam Shakhashiri will present two free shows on the UW-Madison campus in early July. Tickets are not required, but space may be limited, says Shakhashiri, a professor of chemistry who has entertained and enlightened the public for decades at standing-room-only demonstrations.
  • Two researchers named Shaw scientists May 24, 2013 The Greater Milwaukee Foundation has chosen two University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers for 2013 Shaw Scientist Awards.
  • Chemists find new compounds to curb staph infection May 22, 2013 In an age when microbial pathogens are growing increasingly resistant to the conventional antibiotics used to tamp down infection, a team of Wisconsin scientists has synthesized a potent new class of compounds capable of curbing the bacteria that cause staph infections.