Stories indexed under: Cancer

Total: 46   RSSRSS feed

  • Petri dish tumor test could personalize drug therapy for cancer patients June 11, 2015 In a highly successful, first-of-its-kind endeavor, a multidisciplinary team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers has created a "tumor in a dish:" an ex vivo microenvironment that can accurately anticipate a multiple myeloma patient's response to a drug.
  • Study redefines role of estrogen in cervical cancer June 8, 2015 Scientists have prior evidence that the hormone estrogen is a major driver in the growth of cervical cancer, but a new study examining genetic profiles of 128 clinical cases reached a surprising conclusion: Estrogen receptors all but vanish in cervical cancer tumors.
  • Photo: Fotis Asimakopoulos Navigating multiple myeloma with ‘Google Maps’ for the cancer genome June 8, 2015 In some ways, studying the genetics of cancer has been like examining the individual tiles on a mosaic, says David C. Schwartz, a professor of genetics and chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. To make his point, he brings his face close to the table where he sits - his mosaic for the purpose of illustration - and describes the details of each imaginary tile.
  • Photo: image showing tumor Ready, aim, fire! Cancer-targeting mechanism underlies promising UW-Madison spinoff March 30, 2015 For all their lethality, cancer cells don't look much different from healthy cells, a simple fact that causes endless pain and suffering. Finding cancer cells that have spread and threaten to grow into metastatic tumors is often a life-and-death matter.
  • McArdle Laboratory research UW-Madison cancer research showcased in Wisconsin Public Television series March 27, 2015 Next week, cancer research by University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists will be featured in a series of programs airing on Wisconsin Public Television (WPT).
  • Study reveals possible biological trigger for canine bone cancer Feb. 25, 2015 Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine (SVM) have identified the biological mechanism that may give some cancer cells the ability to form tumors in dogs. The recent study uncovered an association between the increased expression of a particular gene in tumor cells and more aggressive behavior in a form of canine bone cancer. It may also have implications for human cancers by detailing a new pathway for tumor formation.
  • Photo: Christian Capitini UW to test ‘breakthrough’ pediatric leukemia treatment Feb. 24, 2015 A promising method of immunotherapy to treat children with relapsed acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is opening at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and American Family Children's Hospital. The trial is open to relapsed/refractory pediatric ALL patients who have limited treatment options.
  • Photo: Xiaojun Tan UW-Madison scientists find how many cancers may evade treatment Jan. 15, 2015 Xiaojun Tan, a graduate student in Richard A. Anderson’s lab at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, made an unexpected observation while studying the locations inside cells where the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR, can be found. His subsequent investigation revealed how cancer was evading treatment drugs: by sneaking through the cellular back door.
  • Collaboration yields new methods to treat tumors with antennas Nov. 7, 2014 A conversation with a University of Wisconsin-Madison neurosurgeon prompted two engineering researchers to challenge a commonly held idea about tumor ablation, and as a result, they're now working to commercialize a new technology that could yield less invasive radiation therapies for cancer patients.
  • Photo: Lee Wilke Company developing radio frequency technology to localize breast tumors Oct. 9, 2014 Breast cancer may inspire more public discussion, advocacy and charitable giving than almost any other disease besides HIV and AIDS. But people rarely talk about the specific experiences to which cancer patients are subjected.
  • Photo: Pamela Kreeger With NIH New Innovator Award, engineer to study how ovarian cancer spreads Oct. 6, 2014 With approximately 22,000 diagnoses annually in the United States, ovarian cancer isn't among the most commonly occurring cancers. Yet, the mortality rate for women who have ovarian cancer hovers above 60 percent.
  • New 'BREATHE' study will help residents quit smoking July 14, 2014 The University of Wisconsin Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention (UW-CTRI) has received a new $12 million grant from the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute to help patients in the Milwaukee and Madison areas quit smoking.
  • Photo: Kevin McSweeney Faster, safer method zaps tumors with great success June 17, 2014 When Kevin McSweeney was referred to UW Health last year for a tumor in his liver, he had already gone through six rounds of chemotherapy and 13 surgeries over ten years to treat his metastasized cancer.
  • Tumor-targeting agent New tumor-targeting agent images and treats variety of cancers June 11, 2014 Scientists at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center (UWCCC) report that a new class of tumor-targeting agents can seek out and find dozens of solid tumors, even illuminating brain cancer stem cells that resist current treatments.
  • Dane County African-Americans have high cancer rates May 8, 2014 African Americans in Dane County were 30 percent more likely than whites to be diagnosed with cancer.
  • UW's Relay for Life on April 11 will help fight cancer April 7, 2014 Participating in a Relay For Life event, like the one set for UW-Madison on April 11, is a way to take action and help finish the fight against cancer.
  • Photo: Cal Melberg Junior Cal Melberg becomes ‘the match’ Feb. 12, 2014 After attending a Be the Match bone marrow donor registration event on campus last May, UW-Madison junior Cal Melberg knew his chances of ever being matched were slim. Then, in September, he got the call.
  • UW researchers link protein with breast cancer's spread to the brain Jan. 6, 2014 A cancer-research team at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has identified a protein that may be a major culprit when breast cancer metastasizes to the brain.
  • Dec. 2, 2013
  • UW researchers witness new type of cell division, use it to battle cancer Aug. 2, 2013 While on their way to finding a means to attack certain types of cancers, the researchers made the first observations of cytofission in humans, a type of cell division that occurs at a different time than normal division.