Stories indexed under: Biosciences

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  • Research communications experts partner with Morgridge Institute March 2, 2015 Dietram Scheufele and colleagues in the Department of Life Sciences Communication (LSC) are partnering with the Morgridge Institute for Research to take a deeper look at what works — and why — in engaging the public on science. Morgridge provides a unique proving ground for the topic: In partnership with the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, science outreach programs bring more than 30,000 participants to the Discovery Building each year.
  • Photo: Ronald Raines Bioenergy center’s research leads to 100th patent application Feb. 25, 2015 The Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), one of three bioenergy research centers established in 2007 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), recently celebrated the filing of its 100th patent application.
  • Photo: Rebecca Blank U.S. biomedical research in crisis: UW-Madison takes charge Feb. 19, 2015 The university is poised to help lead the national conversation to address the systemic flaws within the American biomedical research enterprise and will host a workshop April 11 to share ideas on how to fix it.
  • Photo: Biochemistry research Campus push to address crisis in U.S. biomedical research Feb. 10, 2015 The growing realization that the American biomedical research enterprise is unsustainable and requires a comprehensive fix will be the subject of a wide-ranging campus conversation to take place over the next few months.
  • Sidebar: Sessions set to discuss biomedical research crisis Feb. 10, 2015 A series of campus-wide discussions to gather feedback and ideas from researchers — faculty, staff scientists, postdocs, and graduate students as well as administrative staff — on what many people believe is a crisis in U.S. biomedical research has been scheduled for March.
  • Darwin Day celebration focuses on islands, isolation Feb. 9, 2015 What do Madagascar and Jurassic Park have in common? Both are island-based evolutionary “experiments” that will be highlighted in this year’s Darwin Day celebrations, sponsored by the J.F. Crow Institute for the Study of Evolution at UW-Madison and its partners. “Darwin Day 2015: Islands and Isolation” will run all day Thursday, Feb. 12, and focus on the unique opportunity that islands provide to witness evolution and the diversity of life.
  • Carl Djerassi, UW grad who helped create ‘the pill,’ dies at 91 Jan. 31, 2015
  • Photo: Sam Gellman Chemical dial controls attraction between water-repelling molecules Jan. 14, 2015 Abbott, Gellman and a group of University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers have provided new insights on hydrophobic interactions within complex systems. In a study published today in the journal Nature, the researchers show how the nearby presence of polar (water-attracted, or hydrophilic) substances can change the way the nonpolar hydrophobic groups want to stick to each other.
  • Photo: BioHouse students In its first year, BioHouse brings opportunity for students in science Jan. 6, 2015 BioHouse is the newest of 10 UW–Madison residential learning communities — clusters of students in residence halls who choose to live with others active in a common interest area — three of which are designed for students interested in science. Focused on biological sciences, BioHouse — in partnership with WISCIENCE and University Housing — opened in fall 2014 with 66 residents.
  • Photo: DNA extraction Neal First, whose work led to cattle cloning, dies at 84 Dec. 18, 2014 Emeritus Professor Neal First, a pioneer in cattle reproduction and cloning who studied animal physiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for 45 years, died Nov. 20 from complications of cancer.
  • Image: Portion of eukaryotic cell illustration New theory suggests alternate path led to rise of the eukaryotic cell Dec. 12, 2014 As a fundamental unit of life, the cell is central to all of biology. Better understanding how complex cells evolved and work promises new revelations in areas as diverse as cancer research and developing new crop plants.
  • Photo: Classic and modern biochemical approaches New studies power legacy of UW-Madison mitochondrial research Dec. 11, 2014 Dave Pagliarini recently published two studies shedding more light on coenzyme Q and how it’s made, one in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS) in October and another today in Molecular Cell.
  • Grasshoppers signal slow recovery of post-agricultural woodlands, study finds Nov. 24, 2014 New research by Philip Hahn and John Orrock at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on the recovery of South Carolina longleaf pine woodlands once used for cropland shows just how long lasting the legacy of agriculture can be in the recovery of natural places. By comparing grasshoppers found at woodland sites once used for agriculture to similar sites never disturbed by farming, Hahn and Orrock show that despite decades of recovery, the numbers and types of species found in each differ.
  • Photo: WISCIENCE WISCIENCE to expand possibilities for science education, outreach Oct. 28, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Institute for Biology Education is announcing its expansion to become the Wisconsin Institute for Science Education and Community Engagement, or WISCIENCE. The new mission extends across the natural sciences and expands responsibility for facilitating cross-campus collaboration and coordination in the areas of science outreach and support for groups underrepresented in science.
  • UW to serve as national hub for mentor training as part of diversity consortium Oct. 22, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison will serve as a national hub for research mentor and mentee training for the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) recently announced by NIH as part of a national Diversity Program Consortium. The NIH will award the Diversity Program Consortium nearly $31 million in fiscal year 2014 funds to develop new approaches that engage researchers, including those from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical sciences, and prepare them to thrive in the NIH-funded workforce.
  • Photo: Yoshihiro Kawaoka Influenza researcher Yoshihiro Kawaoka wins Breakthrough Award Oct. 7, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison's Yoshihiro Kawaoka has been recognized as a 2014 Popular Mechanics Breakthrough Award recipient for his efforts to understand and prevent pandemic influenza.
  • Photo: Lodgepole pine forest Mountain pine beetles get a bad rap for wildfires, study says Sept. 29, 2014 Mountain pine beetles get a bad rap, and understandably so. The grain-of-rice-sized insects are responsible for killing pine trees over tens of millions of acres in the Western U.S. and Canada over the last decade. But contrary to popular belief, these pests may not be to blame for more severe wildfires like those that have recently swept through the region. Instead, according to a new study by UW-Madison zoology professor Monica Turner, weather and topography play a greater role in the ecological severity of fires than these bark-boring beetles.
  • Ray Owen In memoriam: Ray D. Owen discovered immune tolerance, paved the way for organ transplantation Sept. 26, 2014 Ray D. Owen, who died on Sept. 21 in Pasadena, California, at the age of 98, discovered the phenomenon of immune tolerance, fueling a revolution in immunology and laying the foundation for the successful transplantation of human organs. Owen left Madison in 1947 to join the faculty at Caltech, where he remained for the rest of his long, distinguished career. His later work included studies on human antibodies, blood-group antigens, and the evolution of immune systems.
  • Photo: James Thomson UW-Madison team developing ‘tissue chip’ to screen neurological toxins Sept. 23, 2014 A multidisciplinary team at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Morgridge Institute for Research is creating a faster, more affordable way to screen for neural toxins, helping flag chemicals that may harm human development.
  • Neuron In directing stem cells, study shows context matters Sept. 8, 2014 In a new study, a team of researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison has added a new wrinkle to the cell differentiation equation, showing that the stiffness of the surfaces on which stem cells are grown can exert a profound influence on cell fate.