Stories indexed under: Animal research

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  • Two receive awards for research to benefit children April 7, 2015 Two University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have received three-year Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards to support research into fungal disease and therapy for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  • Image of a viral cell Ebola whole virus vaccine shown effective, safe in primates March 26, 2015 An Ebola whole virus vaccine, constructed using a novel experimental platform, has been shown to effectively protect monkeys exposed to the often fatal virus.
  • Photo: Children looking into microscopes Science Expeditions opens doors to UW-Madison research March 20-22 March 17, 2015 Science Expeditions, the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s 13th annual science open house, will open the doors of dozens of campus attractions — and the expertise of scores of researchers — to thousands of curious visitors March 20-22.
  • Photo: Charles Snowdon Move over Mozart: Study shows cats prefer their own beat March 10, 2015 As more animal shelters, primate centers and zoos start to play music for their charges, it’s still not clear whether and how human music affects animals. Now, a study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows that while cats ignore our music, they are highly responsive to “music” written especially for them. The study is online at Applied Animal Behaviour Science.
  • Photo: Su-Chun Zhang supervising his lab Laying a foundation for treating ALS, spinal cord injury Feb. 2, 2015 Su-Chun Zhang, a professor of neuroscience and neurology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Waisman Center, and his research team have published a unique model for learning more about the role of human astrocytes today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation today. The findings may lay a foundation for the treatment of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) and debilitating spinal cord injuries.
  • Learning lessons by following Madison’s foxes and coyotes Jan. 30, 2015 Last year, a family of foxes — complete with roly-poly kits — took up residence on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus and made the city its playground. With winter in full swing, the foxes and their larger dog-like counterparts, coyotes, are out there again, roaming the wilder (and often not so wild) parts of the city and campus. This year, David Drake, a UW-Madison associate professor of forest and wildlife ecology, is welcoming the public to join him and his research team as they go out and radio collar the animals in an effort to track and better understand these urban canids.
  • AAAS honors four UW-Madison professors for advancing science Nov. 24, 2014 Four members of the University of Wisconsin–Madison faculty have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the society announced today.
  • Photo: David Vereide Morgridge scientists find way to ‘keep the lights on’ for cell self-renewal Nov. 13, 2014 One remarkable quality of pluripotent stem cells is they are immortal in the lab, able to divide and grow indefinitely under the right conditions. It turns out this ability also may exist further down the development path, with the workhorse progenitor cells responsible for creating specific tissues.
  • Photo: Jeffrey Kahn Animal research ethics discussion to focus on UW anxiety study Oct. 6, 2014 Bioethicist Jeffrey Kahn and veterinary pathologist Eric Sandgren will meet on the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus Thursday evening for a discussion of animal research ethics focusing on a particular program employing monkeys in the study of anxiety and depression. The event, which is free and open to the public, begins 7 p.m. Thursday in Room 1111 of the Genetics-Biotechnology Center Building, 425 Henry Mall.
  • Mouse intestine New imaging agent provides better picture of the gut July 24, 2014 A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This safe, noninvasive method for assessing the function and properties of the GI tract in real time could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of gut diseases.
  • Photo: Igor Slukvin Wisconsin scientists find genetic recipe to turn stem cells to blood July 14, 2014 The ability to reliably and safely make in the laboratory all of the different types of cells in human blood is one key step closer to reality. Writing today (July 14, 2014) in the journal Nature Communications, a group led by University of Wisconsin-Madison stem cell researcher Igor Slukvin reports the discovery of two genetic programs responsible for taking blank-slate stem cells and turning them into both red and the array of white cells that make up human blood.
  • Photo: Sam Gellman Chemical strategy hints at better drugs for osteoporosis, diabetes June 16, 2014 By swapping replacement parts into the backbone of a synthetic hormone, UW-Madison graduate student Ross Cheloha and his mentor Sam Gellman, along with collaborators at Harvard Medical School, have built a version of a parathyroid hormone that resists degradation in laboratory mice. As a result, the altered hormone can stay around longer - and at much higher concentration, says Gellman, professor of chemistry at the UW.
  • Photo: a researcher splits and redistributes cells at the Influenza Research Institute Genes found in nature yield 1918-like virus with pandemic potential June 11, 2014 An international team of researchers has shown that circulating avian influenza viruses contain all the genetic ingredients necessary to underpin the emergence of a virus similar to the deadly 1918 influenza virus.
  • Fox Foxes among Badgers: A family of foxes makes its home on campus April 22, 2014 There are foxes on campus. Big ones and little ones, a new family that started this spring.
  • Monkey Hair from infants gives clues about their life in the womb April 15, 2014 Like rings of a tree, hair can reveal a lot of information about the past.
  • Photo: Richard Weindruch Monkey caloric restriction study shows big benefit; contradicts earlier study April 1, 2014 The latest results from a 25-year study of diet and aging in monkeys shows a significant reduction in mortality and in age-associated diseases among those with calorie-restricted diets. The study, begun at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1989, is one of two ongoing, long-term U.S. efforts to examine the effects of a reduced-calorie diet on nonhuman primates.
  • Summary Abstract of UW-Madison/USDA Settlement Agreement March 17, 2014 The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), which enforces the Animal Welfare Act (AWA), completed its investigation of animal care at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • UW–Madison, USDA enter into settlement agreement March 17, 2014 This month, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the University of Wisconsin-Madison entered into a settlement agreement resulting in a fine of $35,286.
  • Halting Immune Response Could Save Brain Cells After Stroke March 13, 2014 A new study in animals shows that using a compound to block the body’s immune response greatly reduces disability after a stroke.
  • Halting immune response could save brain cells after stroke March 13, 2014 A new study in animals shows that using a compound to block the body’s immune response greatly reduces disability after a stroke.