Stories indexed under: Animal research

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  • Photo: Jeffrey Kahn Animal research ethics discussion to focus on UW anxiety study Oct. 6, 2014 Bioethicist Jeffrey Kahn and veterinary pathologist Eric Sandgren will meet on the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus Thursday evening for a discussion of animal research ethics focusing on a particular program employing monkeys in the study of anxiety and depression. The event, which is free and open to the public, begins 7 p.m. Thursday in Room 1111 of the Genetics-Biotechnology Center Building, 425 Henry Mall.
  • Photo: Igor Slukvin Wisconsin scientists find genetic recipe to turn stem cells to blood July 14, 2014 The ability to reliably and safely make in the laboratory all of the different types of cells in human blood is one key step closer to reality. Writing today (July 14, 2014) in the journal Nature Communications, a group led by University of Wisconsin-Madison stem cell researcher Igor Slukvin reports the discovery of two genetic programs responsible for taking blank-slate stem cells and turning them into both red and the array of white cells that make up human blood.
  • Photo: Sam Gellman Chemical strategy hints at better drugs for osteoporosis, diabetes June 16, 2014 By swapping replacement parts into the backbone of a synthetic hormone, UW-Madison graduate student Ross Cheloha and his mentor Sam Gellman, along with collaborators at Harvard Medical School, have built a version of a parathyroid hormone that resists degradation in laboratory mice. As a result, the altered hormone can stay around longer - and at much higher concentration, says Gellman, professor of chemistry at the UW.
  • Photo: a researcher splits and redistributes cells at the Influenza Research Institute Genes found in nature yield 1918-like virus with pandemic potential June 11, 2014 An international team of researchers has shown that circulating avian influenza viruses contain all the genetic ingredients necessary to underpin the emergence of a virus similar to the deadly 1918 influenza virus.
  • Monkey Hair from infants gives clues about their life in the womb April 15, 2014 Like rings of a tree, hair can reveal a lot of information about the past.
  • Photo: Richard Weindruch Monkey caloric restriction study shows big benefit; contradicts earlier study April 1, 2014 The latest results from a 25-year study of diet and aging in monkeys shows a significant reduction in mortality and in age-associated diseases among those with calorie-restricted diets. The study, begun at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1989, is one of two ongoing, long-term U.S. efforts to examine the effects of a reduced-calorie diet on nonhuman primates.
  • Summary Abstract of UW-Madison/USDA Settlement Agreement March 17, 2014 The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), which enforces the Animal Welfare Act (AWA), completed its investigation of animal care at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • UW–Madison, USDA enter into settlement agreement March 17, 2014 This month, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the University of Wisconsin-Madison entered into a settlement agreement resulting in a fine of $35,286.
  • Halting Immune Response Could Save Brain Cells After Stroke March 13, 2014 A new study in animals shows that using a compound to block the body’s immune response greatly reduces disability after a stroke.
  • Halting immune response could save brain cells after stroke March 13, 2014 A new study in animals shows that using a compound to block the body’s immune response greatly reduces disability after a stroke.
  • Photo: Cara Westmark Study suggests potential association between soy formula and seizures in children with autism March 13, 2014 A University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher has detected a higher rate of seizures among children with autism who were fed infant formula containing soy protein rather than milk protein.
  • Photo: Mahal the orangutan Famed Milwaukee County Zoo orangutan’s death caused by strange infection Feb. 27, 2014 Mahal, the young orangutan who became a star of the Milwaukee County Zoo and an emblem of survival for a dwindling species, led an extraordinary life. It turns out, the young ape died an extraordinary death, too.
  • Researchers Link Protein With Breast Cancer's Spread to the Brain Jan. 7, 2014 A cancer-research team at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has identified a protein that may be a major culprit when breast cancer metastasizes to the brain.
  • Photo: Ei Terasawa Estrogen: Not just produced by the ovaries Dec. 4, 2013 A University of Wisconsin-Madison research team reports today that the brain can produce and release estrogen - a discovery that may lead to a better understanding of hormonal changes observed from before birth throughout the entire aging process.
  • Photo: normal and diseased mouse brains Rare disease yields clues about broader brain pathology Nov. 20, 2013 Alexander disease is a devastating brain disease that almost nobody has heard of — unless someone in the family is afflicted with it. Alexander disease strikes young or old, and in children destroys white matter in the front of the brain. Many patients, especially those with early onset, have significant intellectual disabilities.
  • Photo: Luis Populin Impulsivity, rewards and Ritalin: monkey study shows tighter link Nov. 13, 2013 Even as the rate of diagnosis has reached 11 percent among American children aged 4 to 17, neuroscientists are still trying to understand attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). One classic symptom is impulsivity — the tendency to act before thinking.
  • Photo: Dörte Döpfer Vet med scientists find better, safer treatments for hoof disease in cattle Nov. 8, 2013 For almost 40 years, digital dermatitis has plagued cattle throughout the world. Also called heel warts, these painful hoof lesions limit the amount of time cows can stand and feed, which can hinder animal welfare and food production. The disease can be found on almost every beef and dairy farm in North America, so it has a significant economic impact on those industries in the United States.
  • Photo: Thomas Friedrich H5N1 bird flu genes show nature can pick worrisome traits Oct. 23, 2013 In a study published today (Oct. 23, 2013) in Nature Communications, an international team of researchers shows how evolution can favor mutations that make avian flu more transmissible in mammals.
  • Biomanufacturing center takes central role in developing stem-cell therapies Oct. 17, 2013 Developing a new drug takes enormous amounts of time, money and skill, but the bar is even higher for a promising stem-cell therapy. Many types of cells derived from these ultra-flexible parent cells are moving toward the market, but the very quality that makes stem cells so valuable also makes them a difficult source of therapeutics.
  • Photo: Dario Ringach Target of animal rights protests kicks off animal research ethics forum Oct. 17, 2013 Any research that includes animals presents ethical questions, but they are questions Dario Ringach believes we rarely address together.