Stories indexed under: Waisman Center

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  • Albee Messing named interim Waisman Center director May 29, 2014 On September 1, Albee Messing will step in as the interim director of the Waisman Center, while Marsha R. Mailick serves as the interim vice chancellor for research at the Graduate School.
  • Photo: Marsha Mailick Mailick to join Graduate School April 28, 2014 Marsha Mailick, a longtime University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty member and veteran of research leadership roles at the university, has been selected by Chancellor Rebecca Blank as interim successor to Martin Cadwallader, who is returning to the faculty.
  • Richard J.  Davidson Study reveals gene expression changes with meditation Dec. 4, 2013 With evidence growing that meditation can have beneficial health effects, scientists have sought to understand how these practices physically affect the body.
  • Biomanufacturing center takes central role in developing stem-cell therapies Oct. 17, 2013 Developing a new drug takes enormous amounts of time, money and skill, but the bar is even higher for a promising stem-cell therapy. Many types of cells derived from these ultra-flexible parent cells are moving toward the market, but the very quality that makes stem cells so valuable also makes them a difficult source of therapeutics.
  • Photo: Derek Hei Blank leads off University Roundtable fall series Oct. 9 Oct. 1, 2013 The 2013 Fall University Roundtable series kicks off Oct. 9 with a presentation by Chancellor Rebecca Blank about the future of UW-Madison.
  • A shot of anxiety and the world stinks Sept. 24, 2013 Researchers using powerful new brain imaging technologies are revealing how anxiety or stress can rewire the brain, linking centers of emotion and olfactory processing, to make typically benign smells malodorous.
  • Video: Binaural hearing research at UW-Madison Sept. 5, 2013 Dr. Ruth Litovsky and Dr. Tom Yin of the University of Wisconsin-Madison study binaural hearing - the ability to hear sound with both ears. Animal research is an important part of their work and has led to advancements in improving human hearing.
  • Photo: Lisa Flook Study shows mindfulness training can help reduce teacher stress and burnout Aug. 28, 2013 Teachers who practice "mindfulness" are better able to reduce their own levels of stress and prevent burnout, according to a new study conducted by the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds (CIHM) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Waisman Center.
  • Bridget Muldowney as a preschooler Waisman early childhood alum pursues career of caring Aug. 20, 2013 When Bridget Muldowney was a little girl, she and her friends at the Waisman Early Childhood Program (WECP) would look up from the playground every time the noisy Med Flight helicopter landed at UW Hospital across the street. Today, she’s across the street herself.
  • Photo: Su-Chun Zhang in lab Waisman scientists model human disease in stem cells June 26, 2013 Many scientists use animals to model human diseases. Mice can be obese or display symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Rats get Alzheimer's and diabetes. But animal models are seldom perfect, and so scientists are looking at a relatively new type of stem cell, called the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS cell), that can be grown into specialized cells that become useful models for human disease.
  • Photo: Grandparents with child Grandparents gather for support at Waisman Center June 14, 2013 You're not alone. It's a simple message but one that can provide great comfort. That is just part of what those who gather at the Waisman Center as part of the Grandparents' Network take with them following each meeting.
  • Down syndrome neurons grown from stem cells show signature problems May 27, 2013 In new research published this week, Anita Bhattacharyya, a neuroscientist at the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, reports on brain cells that were grown from skin cells of individuals with Down syndrome.
  • Sensory friendly dining event breaks down barriers May 16, 2013 For many families, the occasional evening out for dinner at a restaurant is an enjoyable treat. But for parents who care for children with autism, the notion of eating out can be panic inducing.
  • Documentary film portrays UW–Madison mindfulness research May 14, 2013 MADISON – Groundbreaking research at the University of Wisconsin–Madison is the focus of the new documentary film, “Free the Mind,” which debuts in Madison tomorrow, May 15.
  • Children's Theatre opens door to Waisman Center resources May 9, 2013 The Waisman Center Children’s Theatre series might make fewer headlines than the center’s groundbreaking research. Still, it maintains a valuable place among the center’s offerings. On Sunday afternoons during the academic year, it provides an accessible, welcoming opportunity for children of all ages and abilities to enjoy the arts.
  • Adult cells transformed into early-stage nerve cells, bypassing the pluripotent stem cell stage May 2, 2013 A University of Wisconsin-Madison research group has converted skin cells from people and monkeys into a cell that can form a wide variety of nervous-system cells - without passing through the do-it-all stage called the induced pluripotent stem cell, or iPSC.
  • Stem cell transplant restores memory, learning in mice April 21, 2013 For the first time, human embryonic stem cells have been transformed into nerve cells that helped mice regain the ability to learn and remember.
  • Dalai Lama to lead ‘Change your Mind Change the World 2013’ event May 15 March 12, 2013 Event organizers today announced that the Dalai Lama will visit Madison on May 15, 2013, to lead "Change your Mind Change the World 2013," a series of panel discussions with thought leaders from a variety of fields, including neuroscience, economics and sustainability, moderated by Arianna Huffington and Daniel Goleman.
  • Authors: Develop digital games to improve brain function and well-being Feb. 28, 2013 Neuroscientists should help to develop compelling digital games that boost brain function and improve well-being, say two professors specializing in the field in a commentary article published in the science journal Nature.
  • Response and recovery in the brain may predict well-being Feb. 4, 2013 It has long been known that the part of the brain called the amygdala is responsible for recognition of a threat and knowing whether to fight or flee from the danger.