News Photos


Caption: Junying Yu, an assistant scientist with the University of Wisconsin-Madison Primate Research Center and the Genome Center of Wisconsin. Yu is lead author of a paper describing a novel method of reprogramming adult stem cells to create cells that are indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells. Her work was performed by a team in the laboratory of stem cell scientist James Thomson.
Photo by: Bryce Richter
Date: November 2007
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG


Caption: Junying Yu, an assistant scientist with the University of Wisconsin-Madison Primate Research Center and the Genome Center of Wisconsin. Yu is lead author of a paper describing a novel method of reprogramming adult stem cells to create cells that are indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells. Her work was performed by a team in the laboratory of stem cell scientist James Thomson.
Photo by: Bryce Richter
Date: November 2007
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG


Caption: Junying Yu, an assistant scientist with the University of Wisconsin-Madison Primate Research Center and the Genome Center of Wisconsin, looks through a microscope at the Genetics and Biotechnology Center building at the UW-Madison on Nov. 19, 2007. Yu is lead author of a paper describing a novel method of reprogramming adult stem cells to create cells that are indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells. Her work was performed by a team in the laboratory of stem cell scientist James Thomson.
Photo by: Bryce Richter
Date: November 2007
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG


Caption: A team in the laboratory of James Thomson (above), a developmental biologist and professor of anatomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, reports the genetic reprogramming of human skin cells to create cells indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells. Thomson's team also produced the first successful isolation of human embryonic stem cell lines in 1998.
Photo by: Jeff Miller
Date: August 2005
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG


Caption: A team in the laboratory of James Thomson (above), a developmental biologist and professor of anatomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, reports the genetic reprogramming of human skin cells to create cells indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells. Thomson's team also produced the first successful isolation of human embryonic stem cell lines in 1998.
Photo by: Jeff Miller
Date: August 2005
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG


Caption: A team in the laboratory of James Thomson (above), a developmental biologist and professor of anatomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, reports the genetic reprogramming of human skin cells to create cells indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells. Thomson's team also produced the first successful isolation of human embryonic stem cell lines in 1998.
Photo by: Jeff Miller
Date: August 2005
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG


Caption: The scientific team from the University of Wisconsin-Madison created genetic modifications in skin cells (above) to induce the cells into what scientists call a pluripotent state — a condition that is essentially the same as that of embryonic stem cells. Junying Yu, James Thomson and their colleagues introduced a set of four genes into human fibroblasts, skin cells that are easy to obtain and grow in culture.
Photo courtesy: Junying Yu
Date: 2007
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG


Caption: The scientific team from the University of Wisconsin-Madison created genetic modifications in skin cells (above) to induce the cells into what scientists call a pluripotent state — a condition that is essentially the same as that of embryonic stem cells. Junying Yu, James Thomson and their colleagues introduced a set of four genes into human fibroblasts, skin cells that are easy to obtain and grow in culture.
Photo courtesy: Junying Yu
Date: 2007
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG


Caption: Ian Wilmut (left) and James Thomson (right).
Photo by: James Gill
Date: May 2007
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG

Photo use

Photographs are available to media organizations and University of Wisconsin-Madison departments for news, editorial and public relations uses, both print and electronic, that are directly related to UW-Madison. They are NOT available for generic use. For university-related use -- including textbooks, commercial products or advertising -- please contact Bryce Richter, photographer, University Communications, (608) 262-7411 or brichter2@wisc.edu.

Published photos must include a credit ("photographer's name/University of Wisconsin-Madison" or "courtesy of"). The specific credit and other details are also embedded in the digital file, which can be viewed by using Photoshop and selecting "file>file info."

None of these images may be modified, altered or used in any way that changes or misrepresents the photograph's content or overall context.