News Photos


Caption: Robert Paulos, associate director for the IceCube project, holds one of the digital optical modules that power the IceCube neutrino telescope. The international project, led by UW-Madison physics Professor Francis Halzen, made significant progress this austral summer, adding 480 basketball-sized optical modules used to track signs of cosmic neutrinos. When completed, the neutrino observatory will occupy a cubic kilometer of Antarctic ice, and will be the world's largest scientific instrument.
Image courtesy: courtesy Ice Cube Project
Date: March 2006
200 DPI JPEG version


Caption: Cables snake down one of the eight 1.5 mile-deep holes drilled this year in the Antarctic ice for project IceCube, a massive neutrino telescope being constructed at the South Pole. The international project, led by UW-Madison physics Professor Francis Halzen, made significant progress this austral summer, adding 480 basketball-sized optical modules used to track signs of cosmic neutrinos. When completed, the neutrino observatory will occupy a cubic kilometer of Antarctic ice, and will be the world's largest scientific instrument.
Image courtesy: courtesy Ice Cube Project
Date: March 2006
200 DPI JPEG version


Caption: A specialized drill head used to melt snow at the surface of the South Pole is deployed as scientists prepare to drill a 1.5 mile deep hole in the Antarctic ice. Known as the firn drill, the device melts surface snow that has not yet been turned to clear ice in preparation for a novel hot-water drill used to make the deep holes in which long strings of light sensors are deployed. The international project, led by UW-Madison physics Professor Francis Halzen, made significant progress this austral summer, adding 480 basketball-sized optical modules used to track signs of cosmic neutrinos. When completed, the neutrino observatory will occupy a cubic kilometer of Antarctic ice, and will be the world's largest scientific instrument.
Image courtesy: courtesy Ice Cube Project
Date: March 2006
200 DPI JPEG version

Photo use

Photographs are available to media organizations and University of Wisconsin-Madison departments for news, editorial and public relations uses, both print and electronic, that are directly related to UW-Madison. They are NOT available for generic use. For university-related use -- including textbooks, commercial products or advertising -- please contact Bryce Richter, photographer, University Communications, (608) 262-7411 or brichter2@wisc.edu.

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