News Photos


Captions
Left: This map shows total carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel burning, cement production, and gas flaring for the world's countries in 2000. Emissions are expressed in million metric tons of carbon. The map was created by a team of climate and health scientists led by Jonathan Patz, associate professor of environmental studies and population health sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Right:
The health effects of global warming vary markedly at the regional scale. This map shows the estimated numbers of deaths per million people that could be attributed to global climate change in the year 2000. Drawing from data from the World Health Organization, the map was created by a team of climate and health scientists led by Jonathan Patz, associate professor of environmental studies and population health sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Photo by: Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment
Date: 2005
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG (left map)
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG (right map)


Caption: Jonathan Patz, associate professor of environmental studies and population health sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Photo by: Michael Forster Rothbart
Date: November 2005
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG

Photo use

Photographs are available to media organizations and University of Wisconsin-Madison departments for news, editorial and public relations uses, both print and electronic, that are directly related to UW-Madison. They are NOT available for generic use. For university-related use -- including textbooks, commercial products or advertising -- please contact Bryce Richter, photographer, University Communications, (608) 262-7411 or brichter2@wisc.edu.

Published photos must include a credit ("photographer's name/University of Wisconsin-Madison" or "courtesy of"). The specific credit and other details are also embedded in the digital file, which can be viewed by using Photoshop and selecting "file>file info."

None of these images may be modified, altered or used in any way that changes or misrepresents the photograph's content or overall context.