News Photos


Caption: A study by James Burton and T. Douglas Price of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Vera Tiesler of the Autonomous University of the Yucatan provides the earliest definitive link between the African Diaspora and the New World. Digging in a colonial-era graveyard in Campeche, one of the oldest European cities in Mexico, archaeologists found and researchers chemically analyzed what they believe are the oldest remains of slaves brought from African to the New World. Pictured here is a grave where skeletons of Africans were found in the cemetery in Campeche, Mexico.
Photo by: courtesy T. Douglas Price
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG


Caption: A study by James Burton and T. Douglas Price of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Vera Tiesler of the Autonomous University of the Yucatan provides the earliest definitive link between the African Diaspora and the New World. Digging in a colonial-era graveyard in Campeche, one of the oldest European cities in Mexico, archaeologists found and researchers chemically analyzed what they believe are the oldest remains of slaves brought from African to the New World. Pictured here are upper incisor teeth that have been filed at an angle, a distinctive dental mutilation distinctive to African practices in the 16th century.
Photo by: courtesy T. Douglas Price
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG


Caption: A study by James Burton and T. Douglas Price of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Vera Tiesler of the Autonomous University of the Yucatan provides the earliest definitive link between the African Diaspora and the New World. Digging in a colonial-era graveyard in Campeche, one of the oldest European cities in Mexico, archaeologists found and researchers chemically analyzed what they believe are the oldest remains of slaves brought from African to the New World. Pictured here, handwritten notes on a plastic bag document reference data for a molar tooth from one of the skeletal remains that was chemically analyzed in the Campeche study.
Photo by: Jeff Miller
Date: January 2006
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG


Caption: James Burton, senior scientist in the Department of Anthropology and associate director of the Laboratory for Archaeological Chemistry.
Photo by: Jeff Miller
Date: January 2006
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG


Caption: T. Douglas Price, professor of anthropology and director of the Laboratory for Archaeological Chemistry.
Photo by: Jeff Miller
Date: January 2006
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG


Caption: Campeche, one of the oldest European settlements in Mexico, was a gateway to the New World for European explorers and colonists and, evidently, slaves from Africa. Digging near the central plaza of the port city on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, archaeologists have uncovered the oldest physical evidence to date for slaves brought to the New World from Africa.
Illustration by: Barry Carlsen
Date: January 2006
High-resolution 300 DPI JPEG
High-resolution 300 DPI EPS

Photo use

Photographs are available to media organizations and University of Wisconsin-Madison departments for news, editorial and public relations uses, both print and electronic, that are directly related to UW-Madison. They are NOT available for generic use. For university-related use -- including textbooks, commercial products or advertising -- please contact Bryce Richter, photographer, University Communications, (608) 262-7411 or brichter2@wisc.edu.

Published photos must include a credit ("photographer's name/University of Wisconsin-Madison" or "courtesy of"). The specific credit and other details are also embedded in the digital file, which can be viewed by using Photoshop and selecting "file>file info."

None of these images may be modified, altered or used in any way that changes or misrepresents the photograph's content or overall context.