Stories indexed under: Health

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  • With a few questions, pharmacists can make Ramadan’s fast safe for Muslim patients July 15, 2013 Nearly a quarter of the world's population is celebrating Ramadan this month, but many of them are fasting in observance of the Muslim holy month at unnecessary risk to their health.
  • Photo: Newborn and mother Just a few drops of blood can save a baby’s life: Celebrating 50 years of newborn screening July 9, 2013 Every day, the hopes and dreams of hundreds of new parents pass through the capable hands of approximately 20 people they will probably never meet on the fourth floor of a UW-Madison campus building they will probably never visit.
  • Photo: Phil Farrell In a sea of data, Bioinformatics Resource Center rides genomic wave July 2, 2013 In July 2012, the UW-Madison Bioinformatics Resource Center opened for business, providing one-stop shopping for genetic sequencing, genome assembly, analysis and a host of services to help UW-Madison faculty and others make sense of the sea of data generated by new technologies that have put the secrets of human, plant, animal and microbial genomes within tantalizing reach.
  • Campus offers support after talented student’s death April 11, 2013 University Health Services and the Division of Student Life are offering support to all students affected by the loss of UW-Madison senior Henry Mackaman.
  • In autism, age at diagnosis depends on specific symptoms April 9, 2013 The age at which a child with autism is diagnosed is related to the particular suite of behavioral symptoms he or she exhibits, new research from the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows.
  • Journalist, author McKenna to be Science Writer in Residence April 8, 2013 Independent journalist and author Maryn McKenna has been named the Spring 2013 UW-Madison Science Writer in Residence.
  • School of Veterinary Medicine, UW Veterinary Care to hold open house March 25, 2013 The UW School of Veterinary Medicine and UW Veterinary Care, the school's veterinary medical teaching hospital, will host an open house on Sunday, April 7 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Waisman Center: Celebrating 40 years of advancing knowledge about developmental disabilities Jan. 24, 2013 From her perch as director of the Waisman Center, and with an insider’s knowledge of its work to advance our understanding of developmental disability and the people it affects, Marsha Mailick sees a hopeful microcosm of the best attributes of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • University Health Services: Time to get a flu shot Jan. 7, 2013 Over the past few weeks, Wisconsin has seen a significant increase in flu case numbers. The flu may be here but it’s not too late to protect yourself.
  • Telephone talks with nurse can reduce hospital re-admissions Dec. 6, 2012 Weekly telephone contact with a nurse substantially reduced hospital re-admissions for high-risk patients, according to results of a University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health study.
  • Class explores worldwide picture for AIDS, HIV Nov. 29, 2012 "This is an important time in HIV research," Matt Reynolds, an HIV researcher at University of Wisconsin-Madison, tells an undergraduate class on the Monday morning after Thanksgiving.
  • Study sees reduced C-section births in Amish Community Nov. 16, 2012 A birthing center set up specifically for women in a Wisconsin Amish community may point the way to reducing the high rate of cesarean-section births in the United States, according to a new study.
  • Tobacco research pioneer elected to Institute of Medicine Oct. 15, 2012 Dr. Michael Fiore, founder of the UW Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been elected to the Institute of Medicine, one of the nation’s most prestigious scientific organizations.
  • Tailored breast cancer screening model developed Oct. 11, 2012 How early and how often should women have mammograms? In theory, it's, "Annually, beginning at age 40." As of late, however, that answer has been up for debate - in part because of the risk of false positives, unnecessary biopsies, and the fear and anxiety that go along with such a diagnosis - and the answer has shifted to a more ambiguous, "It depends."
  • Vet med students ensure safe, speedy biosecurity check-in for dairy expo cattle Sept. 27, 2012 Scores of trailers will begin rolling into Madison on Friday, Sept. 28, delivering 2,500 show cows to the Alliant Energy Center for the upcoming World Dairy Expo. But to prevent the spread of disease among the cattle, the health status of each animal must be verified before they are unloaded. Fortunately, volunteer students from the UW-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine keep this process running as smoothly as possible.
  • UW team to test mobile apps to prevent substance abuse relapses Sept. 21, 2012 Can giving smartphones to people with substance use disorders improve the quality of care at the same time as it reduces health care costs? A team of scholars centered at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Dartmouth College thinks so, and has won a federal grant to create and test mobile apps to deliver tested treatment and relapse prevention tools through these devices.
  • Campus flu shot clinics start Sept. 17 Sept. 13, 2012 University Health Services (UHS) will again offer seasonal influenza immunizations (flu shots) for all registered students, faculty and staff. Just like last year, student flu shot clinics will be held at separate locations and dates from UW-employee clinics.
  • Reduced brain connections seen in people with generalized anxiety disorder Sept. 3, 2012 A new University of Wisconsin-Madison imaging study shows the brains of people with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) have weaker connections between a brain structure that controls emotional response and the amygdala, which suggests the brain's "panic button" may stay on due to lack of regulation.
  • West Nile's 'super spreader:' How about the American robin? Aug. 23, 2012 The 2012 outbreak of West Nile virus, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, promises to be the largest since the disease was first detected in the United States 13 years ago.
  • New building drives changes at School of Nursing Aug. 16, 2012 The School of Nursing is always in the process of evolution, but bigger changes – including a new building – are driving a more comprehensive redesign of its curriculum.