Stories indexed under: Business

Total: 754   RSSRSS feed

  • UW dairy center helps with champion cheeses Aug. 22, 2005 Mike Gingrich’s Uplands Cheese Co. worked with the Center for Dairy Research at UW-Madison for advice on how to make their cheese and operate a cheese-making business.
  • Undergraduate business program rises to #12 in nation Aug. 19, 2005 The latest U.S. News & World Report ranking of undergraduate business programs places UW-Madison 12th among all business schools in the U.S., up two spots from 14 th place last year.
  • Despite gains, women still face bias in science careers Aug. 18, 2005 Despite gains in the training of women scientists and the implementation of programs to help women overcome ingrained barriers, the career path of most women scientists at universities remains a difficult trek, fraught with roadblocks of bias, a sometimes chilly campus climate and the challenge of balancing family and work.
  • Polymer bandages may give new life to old bridges Aug. 15, 2005 Long polymer "bandages," designed so that troops could quickly repair or reinforce bridges to bear the weight of 113-ton military tank transport vehicles, now could be used to quickly and inexpensively strengthen aging rural bridges and concrete culverts around the country.
  • UW-Madison in drivers’ seat of national transportation center Aug. 9, 2005 With $16 million in funding over five years from the U.S. Department of Transportation, UW-Madison transportation engineers will drive their research, education and technology-transfer efforts to the national level. President Bush will sign the "Safe, Accountable, Flexible and Efficient Transportation Act: A Legacy for Users" Wednesday in Aurora, Ill. The bill designates UW-Madison as one of 10 National University Transportation Centers charged with advancing research on critical national transportation issues and expanding the workforce of transportation professionals.
  • Center for Integrated Ag Systems Selected as a Pesticide Reduction Champion Aug. 4, 2005 The UW-Madison Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems has been selected by the EPA as a Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program Champion for 2005. This designation honors CIAS for its efforts to reduce pesticide risk through sustainable agricultural practices such as Integrated Pest Management and organic farming. CIAS also received this national honor in 2003.
  • South African telescope poses opportunities for U.S. businesses Aug. 3, 2005 Thanks to its geography and its clear skies, South Africa has long been a prime location for astronomy. Which is why UW-Madison – plus a dozen other international organizations - signed on a little more than five years ago to help build and fund SALT, the Southern African Large Telescope. Faculty and administrators will travel to this emerging economic powerhouse on the African continent’s southern tip in November when SALT – the largest telescope in the hemisphere - captures its first light. They also hope to open doors to Wisconsin business leaders accompanying them on the trip, nurturing what they foresee as a two-way commercial exchange that will benefit both the Badger State and South Africa.
  • Engineers chart semiconductors on the scale of atoms Aug. 1, 2005 Spanning fewer than a thousand atoms, the electronic devices on semiconductor chips have become so miniscule they defy most efforts to characterize them. Now for the first time, engineers have demonstrated a way to image these vanishingly small devices by mapping them atom by atom.
  • First Business Financial Services elects Bugher to board of directors July 25, 2005
  • Students grab top honors in food competition July 19, 2005 It looks like odd years are a lucky charm for the UW-Madison Product Development Team. The group of food science students captured first place this year in a national product development contest sponsored by the Institute of Food Technologists for "Healthy sTarts," a granola cup coated with strawberry-flavored yogurt and topped with strawberries and blueberries.
  • Diamonds are a scientist’s best friend July 14, 2005 Do diamonds really last forever? That's the hope of UW-Madison researchers who are trying to solve the problems associated with building extremely small machines and having them withstand the test of time, wear and tear.
  • Students' granola-yogurt fruit cup may scoop up national honors July 14, 2005 A group of UW-Madison food science students have spent the past year developing what may be the next big thing to hit grocery shelves.
  • Engineer creates tool for keeping computers cool July 11, 2005 Anyone who has listened to the constant whir of a computer's fan or held a laptop for too long knows how blazing hot computers can get. UW-Madison engineers have created a spray cooling method that early tests show can remove heat at rates up to three times faster than other spray techniques.
  • Forestry project will map likely habitat of endangered butterfly July 7, 2005 A grant from the University of Wisconsin-Madison Graduate School's Technology Transfer Program will fund a project that uses computer mapping and statistical modeling to identify likely habitat of the endangered Karner blue butterfly. The project could help Wisconsin land managers save thousands of dollars on field surveys required to protect the rare insect.
  • UW-Madison scientists receive $20 million award for protein study July 6, 2005 Researchers at the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics, based at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, have received a $20 million award to fund Phase II of the Protein Structure Initiative over the next five years.
  • New business startup program message sent to UW-Madison faculty and staff July 1, 2005 New Business Start-Up Program Message Sent to UW-Madison Faculty and Staff
  • Pros visit UW-Madison for sweet truth about candy June 20, 2005 The 43rd annual Resident Course in Confectionary Technology for professionals run through June 24 on the UW-Madison campus.
  • Two Wisconsin veterinary students win national awards June 17, 2005 Two of five national awards given by the American Association of Bovine Practitioners (AABP) recognizing academic achievement went to students at the School of Veterinary Medicine.
  • UW-Madison accounting professor among most influential in finance June 16, 2005 An accounting professor at the School of Business has been named one of the nation’s 100 most influential people in finance.
  • Technique provides path to manufacturing complex nano-electronic devices June 9, 2005 In the time it takes to read this sentence, your fingernail will have grown one nanometer. That's one-billionth of a meter and it represents the scale at which electronics must be built if the march toward miniaturization is to continue. Reporting in the June 3 issue of the journal Science, an international team of researchers shows how control over materials on this tiny scale can be extended to create complex patterns important in the production of nano-electronics.