UW-Madison in the Media

A selection of media coverage about the university and its people.

  • Our View: UW's new focus on tech transfer could pay off Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Jan. 14, 2014 Entrepreneurs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison soon will have a new advocate on campus that should boost the number of ideas that are commercialized, which we think should, in turn, give the state’s economy a boost over time.
  • Our Views: Student-athletes at UW winning at discipline, too Janesville Gazette Jan. 14, 2014 In case you missed it, something remarkable is developing in that athletic complex known as UW-Madison.
  • UW 'ideas factory' looks to turn research into economic growth Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Jan. 13, 2014 When Rebecca Blank arrived at the University of Wisconsin-Madison last summer, she became chancellor of one of the largest academic research universities in the world, but one that has an uneven track record for commercializing that work.
  • Five Decades Later, Time To Change The Way We Define Poverty? NPR News Jan. 8, 2014 The U.S. government’s official measure of poverty hasn’t changed much in 50 years: It’s still based on what it took to feed a family in the 1950s. There are new efforts underway to find a more accurate gauge of families in need. Interviewed: Chancellor Becky Blank. (Audio.)
  • Protein linked by UW team to breast cancer's spread to the brain Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Jan. 8, 2014 New research from scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has linked a protein to the spread of breast cancer to the brain.
  • Turning Victorian literature into data into visual art Boston Globe Jan. 7, 2014 The big knock on the digital humanities is that it has no soul. Sure, you can set computers to crunch data on Shakespeare’s plays, but even the cleverest little algorithm is going to miss the anguish at the end of “Romeo and Juliet.” A new project at the University of Wisconsin, however, shows the artistic potential in cold statistics.
  • Candidates for UW System president stress trust, transparency Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Jan. 7, 2014 Mostly empty lecture halls at University of Wisconsin System campuses across the state greeted three finalists for system president on a frigid Monday as they took questions via video conference on topics ranging from how they would rebuild trust with lawmakers to how they would balance the different needs of 26 campuses.
  • How to Tap into Your Creativity Elle Jan. 6, 2014 Noted: For my inspiration fix, I head to the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery (WID), on the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus. The goal of the place, its lion-haired director, David Krakauer, tells me, exuberantly drawing arrows and intersecting circles on a whiteboard, is to bring together researchers from many historically isolated departments to share theories, concepts, and data sets. Krakauer, a geneticist who also happens to have deep and sophisticated interests in art and music and education reform, has written a quote from Niels Bohr across his office window in grease pencil: “Your theory is crazy, but it’s not crazy enough to be true.”
  • Barry Alvarez confident in program's direction Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Jan. 3, 2014 Orlando, Fla. — Barry Alvarez has watched the Wisconsin football program rise, fall and rise again over the last 24 seasons, first as head coach and now as UW’s director of athletics.
  • Big Ideas 2013 Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Dec. 30, 2013 Each year, great ideas emerge from Wisconsin’s research labs. Today, we highlight some of the most interesting. (Several are from UW-Madison.)
  • Soyeon Shim wants to see UW-Madison solve big problems Capital Times Dec. 30, 2013 On a frigid, snowy morning last week, the UW-Madison campus is nearly deserted and Dean Soyeon Shim is using the rare silence in Nancy Nicholas Hall to do some thinking about a paper she’s planning to write. As might be expected for the building that houses the university’s interior architecture program, the space is bright, comfortable and exquisitely designed.
  • African storyteller professor left imprint on students Wisconsin State Journal Dec. 30, 2013 Looking back, Harold Scheub sees nothing in his urban northern Indiana boyhood that prepared him for a decade of tramping around the African continent, tape recorder in hand, gathering thousands of spoken stories.
  • Kevin Reilly ending chapter as UW System president Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Dec. 30, 2013 It’s been a high-profile year for Kevin Reilly, who will leave his job as president of the University of Wisconsin System on Dec. 31.
  • To Smoosh Peas Is to Learn New York Times Dec. 27, 2013 Noted: The psychologists who did this research were interested in the question of how babies learn about “nonsolid” objects. “We had noticed in our lab work before that children are much better at learning names for new solid objects that they didn’t know before,” said Lynn Perry, now a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and lead author of the study.
  • Peaceful Christmas welcome after open heart surgery during pregnancy Wisconsin State Journal Dec. 26, 2013 The ordeal came as Dr. Nick Haun worked long shifts as an internal medicine resident at Meriter, UW Hospital and Madison’s Veterans Hospital. He’ll be chief resident next year, imparting lessons to less experienced doctors.
  • UW DNA facility may help bring final member of WWII unit home WISC-TV 3 Dec. 26, 2013 MADISON, Wis. -They were like family. Young men who went to war, they fought together, they spilled blood together, and some died together. When World War II ended most came home.
  • IT expert says US could have safer credit/debit cards WKOW-TV 27 Dec. 26, 2013 As America continues to deal with the Target cyber-security breach that compromised the financial information of 40 million people, several IT security experts are pointing out that the technology exists to avoid such problems.
  • To UW-Madison professor, there's nothing ordinary about vanilla Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Dec. 20, 2013 To Ken Cameron, vanilla is a lot sexier than its name implies.The worlds leading expert on the biology of vanilla orchids sees the popular spice, not as plain or ordinary, but as a beautifully complex and valuable commodity produced from the worlds largest family of plants.
  • Blum: Fashion at a Very High Price New York Times Dec. 20, 2013 From cheerful red handbags to festive green belts, colored accessories are often mandatory for the style-conscious during the holiday season. But what many fashionistas don’t know is that many of these products may be tainted with high levels of lead — and the brighter and shinier they are, the greater the risk.
  • Jignesh Patel’s Big Data Revolution Madison Magazine Dec. 19, 2013 "It’s kind of like finding a needle in a haystack."Jignesh Patel is sitting in a Madison café talking about big data. Between sips of coffee, the University of Wisconsin computer sciences professor uses the familiar expression to explain just what this buzzy tech phrase is all about before launching into a remarkable story about Madison’s connection to its past, present and future.
  • Wisconsin basketball is unchanged, but its success is unparalleled USA Today Dec. 17, 2013 When high school coaches across this state visit Wisconsin to watch practice every winter, the same sequence occurs: They see the Badgers pair up – just two players and a ball – and engage in the most rudimentary activity, monotonously passing and catching a basketball.
  • Madison Initiative for Undergraduates enters fifth year The Badger Herald Dec. 13, 2013 A tuition surcharge for an undergraduate initiative allows University of Wisconsin to provide services that state and other funding cuts would have otherwise eliminated.
  • #UWSecretSanta leaving gifts for UW-Madison students WISC-TV 3 Dec. 13, 2013 It is something very simple that is having a positive impact on students during a trying time. During finals week on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus, students spend long hours studying in the libraries.
  • Who Made Those Cop Shows? New York Times Dec. 13, 2013 Noted: In contrast to today’s cop shows, the early programs were very pro-police, without much moral ambiguity, says Michele Hilmes, a University of Wisconsin historian of television and radio.
  • Poverty conditions may hinder early brain development, UW-Madison study suggests Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Dec. 13, 2013 Poverty may have direct implications for important, early steps in the development of the brain, according to newly published research from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • Entomologist Names Wisconsin 'Bug Of The Year' Wisconsin Public Radio News Dec. 12, 2013 No two years are the same, and while insects are always around, some stand out as particularly interesting or surprising. Phil Pellitteri, an entomologist and head of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Insect Diagnostic Lab, said that when he assessed this year, he realized that while he exceeded the previous year in number of specimens submitted to the lab, 2013 “didn’t seem that buggy.”
  • Winter Weather, Holidays Pose Risks To Pets Wisconsin Public Radio News Dec. 11, 2013 Dr. Sandi Sawchuk, a professor of veterinary medicine at the Univeristy of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, shared that all pets aren’t the same when it comes to dealing with the snow and cold.
  • Susan Boyle among those who find autism diagnosis a relief TODAY.com Dec. 10, 2013 Quoted: The diagnostic criteria for autism has changed dramatically, even in the last 20 years, explained Megan Farley, a psychologist at the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Until the mid-1990s, there wasn’t an autism "spectrum" — there was just autistic disorder. "It was this very strict type of diagnostic category," Farley says. That captured the "classic" cases of autism, but people with more subtle signs of the disorder slipped by unnoticed until 1994, when Asperger’s syndrome was introduced. (Asperger’s syndrome is no longer an "official" diagnosis, and what used to be Asperger’s is now the mildest level of autism spectrum disorder.) 
  • Experience: I discovered a new species up my nose The Guardian Dec. 9, 2013 It was about three days after I’d left Africa that the pain in my nose became too severe to ignore. Starting as a dull ache niggling at the edge of my consciousness, it had gradually built in intensity to the point at which I had to stop what I was doing to investigate further.
  • The next civil rights fight: Gloria Ladson-Billings believes African American students deserve better Isthmus Dec. 6, 2013 Gloria Ladson-Billings travels the world, speaking and teaching about racial disparities in education. A professor in curriculum and instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, her books -- including the bestseller The Dreamkeepers: Successful Teachers of African American Children -- are considered part of the canon for teacher educators. Ivy League schools have tried to lure her away, but she has turned down offers from Harvard and Stanford, where she got her Ph.D.