UW-Madison in the Media

A selection of media coverage about the university and its people.

  • 'Microgrids' energy storage project announced Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Oct. 4, 2011 Microgrids will be set up at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2012 and at UW-Madison’s new Wisconsin Energy Institute Building, scheduled to open in 2013, according to the initiative by the Center for Renewable Energy Systems. The Center aims to conduct applied research to help Wisconsin companies develop projects for the renewable energy and energy storage markets.
  • Wilson and Wisconsin Run Down Nebraska, 48-17 New York Times Oct. 2, 2011 MADISON, Wis. — On his first day on the Wisconsin campus this summer after transferring from North Carolina State, Wisconsin quarterback Russell Wilson called his own team meeting. He delivered a short and simple message to his new teammates: he had come to work hard and compete. But just the simple act of introducing himself to his teammates and acknowledging that nothing would be handed to him spoke to his savvy and maturity.
  • With Nebraska in Town, Wisconsin Gets Ready to Jump New York Times Oct. 1, 2011 When Nebraska travels to Wisconsin for its Big Ten inauguration Saturday night, the game will resonate as a cultural event as much as a sporting contest. Wisconsin is bracing for the presence of some 30,000 Nebraska fans in Madison this weekend, many of whom do not have tickets and are just tagging along for the revelry and history.
  • Tickets or no tickets, Nebraska fans migrating for inaugural Big Ten game at No. 7 Wisconsin Washington Post Sept. 29, 2011 Wisconsin officials tout Saturday night’s game against Nebraska as the toughest ticket ever at 94-year-old Camp Randall Stadium.
  • State, cranberry industry look to capitalize on growing demand in China Wausau Daily Herald Sept. 29, 2011 CRANMOOR -- Gong Ruina, a graduate student at Beijing Sport University and world-champion badminton player, said harvesting cranberries is more difficult than it looks.
  • Nebraska fans expected to come to Wisconsin in full force Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Sept. 27, 2011 Barry Alvarez’s memory teems with Camp Randall Stadium moments. They’ve accumulated over the last 21-plus years - 16 as football coach and five-plus as full-time athletic director:The back-to-back games against Michigan and Ohio State in the 1993 Rose Bowl season; the victory over Penn State in ’98 to clinch another trip to Pasadena; the victory over Iowa in ’99, which brought another Big Ten Conference title and a national rushing record for Ron Dayne; and the upset of No. 1 Ohio State last season. Nebraska’s visit to Madison this week, the Cornhuskers’ first Big Ten game, could rise to the top of that list.
  • For University of Wisconsin, New Facebook Fans Pay Off New York Times Sept. 21, 2011 The value of a follower on Twitter or Facebook can be nebulous – unless you’re the University of Wisconsin, Madison, this month.
  • Editorial: Ward welcome for one more year Daily Cardinal Sept. 22, 2011 The question surrounding Interim Chancellor David Ward’s term length recently surfaced as UW-Madison’s University Committee requested he stay an additional year. While the interim position is only allotted a single-year term during a search and screen process, members of the UW faculty argue Ward’s background, collegiate experience and national insight put him in the best position to lead UW-Madison through Wisconsin’s rocky political climate.
  • Editorial: University of Wisconsin-Madison policy right to promote diversity Appleton Post-Crescent Sept. 19, 2011 Every so often, a group calls out the University of Wisconsin-Madison for having an admissions policy that takes into account factors other than academics — such as race.
  • The Cyborg in Us All New York Times Sept. 19, 2011 Noted: Justin Williams, a biomedical engineer at the University of Wisconsin, has already transformed the ECoG implant into a microdevice that can be installed with a minimum of fuss. It has been tested in animals for long periods of time — the micro ECoG stays in place and doesn’t seem to negatively affect the immune system. Williams said he hopes to try it in humans soon. “Our goal is to make devices that would require only an outpatient procedure,” he says. “Even if we could make it an overnight stay in the hospital, that would be good.” The implant, in humans, would be about the size of a quarter and sit like a plug in the skull, with a tiny antenna for wireless hookup between machine and brain.
  • Criminal minds: As brain research enters classroom, UW plans to train attorney-scientists Capital Times Sept. 14, 2011 In 2008, Tyler Mills went to court on a charge of child enticement. The charge stemmed from an online conversation with a cop posing as a 14-year-old girl, during which Mills asked her to “de-virginize” him.
  • UW-Madison faculty, students fight admissions discrimination charge Wisconsin State Journal Sept. 14, 2011 UW-Madison waged an all-day offensive Tuesday against a charge that it engages in discriminatory admissions practices — as students and staff rallied on Bascom Hill, hijacked a press conference and disputed the findings of the admissions allegation.
  • Percentage of Americans Living in Poverty Rises to Highest Level Since 1993 New York Times Sept. 14, 2011 Quoted: “We’re risking a new underclass,” said Timothy Smeeding, director of the Institute for Research and Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.
  • Teaching 9/11: How educators are responding 10 years later Christian Science Monitor Sept. 9, 2011 As Diana Hess learned that airplanes had slammed into the twin towers in lower Manhattan on Sept. 11, 2001, her first instinct was to cancel her classes for the day. But before she could, the University of Wisconsin education professor began receiving frantic calls from her students – pleading with her to hold class as planned.
  • City counties ranked healthier than rural CBSNews.com Sept. 8, 2011 Many people think of the city lifestyle as unhealthy, associating it with noise, pollution, crime, dense populations, a fast pace, and high stress levels. Many aspire to leaving the city for the country and the healthier lifestyle they think more tranquility brings. Fresh air, open spaces and chirping birds should be conducive to a much healthier lifestyle, or so the thinking goes. But, reports CBS News correspondent Elaine Quijano, a new study seems to dispel those notions.Cities once infamous for pollution, crime, crowding and infectious diseases have cleaned up their act. "They may have a better educational system," says Patrick Remington, project director of County Health Rankings, a report published by the University of Wisconsin that ranks more than 3,000 counties nationwide against others in their states.
  • The 9/11 Decade - Lessons Differ Around the World New York Times Sept. 8, 2011 Noted: Diana E. Hess, an education professor at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, analyzed nine American high school textbooks that together are used by almost half of American students. She found that while they used dramatic labels (“horrendous plot” or “crime against humanity”) to describe the attacks, they provided little information about what actually happened. Most of the textbooks did not even say how many people were killed or who was responsible for the attacks.
  • When law takes effect, guns will be legal on UW campuses, but not in buildings Wisconsin State Journal Sept. 6, 2011 Come November, Badger fans may tailgate while armed but will still be forbidden from bringing their guns inside stadiums, classrooms or any other buildings at the flagship UW-Madison campus and the University of Wisconsin System’s 26 campuses statewide, officials confirmed Thursday. "I would like that," said UW-Madison sophomore Roxolana Sklepova of keeping buildings weapon-free. "You would hope people wouldn’t bring guns to those places anyway." The shift — currently guns are barred on system campuses — comes to accommodate the state’s concealed carry law and will likely change the look of campuses, with large "Firearms Prohibited in Building" signs expected to adorn every entrance to every campus building in accordance with the new law.
  • 5 Other Surprise Attacks That Changed History National Public Radio Sept. 7, 2011 Noted: Compiling such a list can be a complex undertaking. "Issues of scale, era and location complicate the question, as do the criteria for a ’sneak attack’ — which is often viewed as a preemptive strike by those who launch it," observes military historian John W. Hall at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. "Rarely are such affairs complete and total surprises. In hindsight, it often emerges that the indicators for an attack were present but overlooked, or not placed in the proper context."
  • Ask the Weather Guys: Was the forecast of Irene a success? Wisconsin State Journal Sept. 6, 2011 Quoted: Steven A. Ackerman and Jonathan Martin, professors in the UW-Madison department of atmospheric and oceanic sciences.
  • Walking could power your next cell phone, researchers say CNN.com Aug. 25, 2011 Will you be able to charge your next mobile phone simply by walking around? A group of researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison hope so.
  • A Faculty (Led) Search Inside Higher Education Aug. 25, 2011 Everyone wants a seat at the table when a campus picks a new leader, and it’s rare that groups say they have enough representation. With so many campus constituencies -- including faculty, staff, students, alumni, trustees, and community members -- finding enough seats is tough, and more often than not, faculty members say they’re not given their fair share.
  • Scientists find lager beer's missing link — in Patagonia Los Angeles Times Aug. 23, 2011 How did lager beer come to be? After pondering the question for decades, scientists have found that an elusive species of yeast isolated in the forests of Argentina was key to the invention of the crisp-tasting German beer 600 years ago.
  • IBM pursues chips that behave like brains Associated Press Aug. 18, 2011 The challenge in training a computer to behave like a human brain is technological and physiological, testing the limits of computer and brain science. But researchers from IBM Corp. say they’ve made a key step toward combining the two worlds. But what's important is not what the chips are doing, but how they're doing it, says Giulio Tononi, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin at Madison who worked with IBM on the project.
  • UW-Madison search: Chancellor vacancies aplenty at other schools Wisconsin State Journal Aug. 15, 2011 UW-Madison will face stiff competition for the best national candidates as it searches for a new chancellor, according to higher education experts. That’s because an “extraordinary” number of similar universities also are looking for new leaders, said Jan Greenwood, a search consultant who specializes in university presidencies. Finding the right candidate is important because university presidents must be able to fill a range of roles: CEO and academic, politician and cheerleader, public speaker and master fundraiser.
  • Campus Connection: University of Wisconsin-Madison 19th in world rankings Capital Times Aug. 15, 2011 The University of Wisconsin-Madison is slotted 19th in this year’s Academic Ranking of World Universities, which is compiled by Jiaotong University in Shanghai. UW-Madison is the top-ranked Big Ten Conference school, with the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor next at No. 22. However, UW-Madison dropped two spots from a year ago, when it was 17th.
  • UW Hospitals and Clinics named one of 10 Best Companies for Kids Wisconsin State Journal Aug. 16, 2011 When one of Nikki Engledow’s two sons is too sick for school and she can’t stay home, or her child care arrangements fall through, she takes advantage of the backup care benefit offered to her as an employee of UW Hospital and Clinics. "I’ve called in the middle of the night or the morning of when one of the boys has been ill ... and they have been able to arrange child care without a problem," said Engledow, a clinical nurse manager. The backup care benefit, which provides employees access to a service that finds last-minute care for their children, spouse, partner or elderly parents, has helped UW Hospital and Clinics earn a spot on Working Mother Magazine’s list of 10 Best Companies for Kids for 2011.
  • Moving Days beginning in Madison WKOW-TV 27 Aug. 12, 2011 It’s Moving Days in Madison. This weekend, most downtown apartment leases are up.  That means thousands of people will be sorting through their stuff and finding a lot they no longer need.
  • Braveheart in Wisconsin State Fair parade WKOW-TV 27 Aug. 11, 2011 Braveheart’s remarkable recovery will be on display on UW-Madison Day at the Wisconsin State Fair in West Allis on Wednesday, Aug. 10. In addition, Braveheart, along with UW’s Bucky Badger will lead the daily parade around the fairgrounds that day.
  • Analyst Expects Walker Recall Effort to Proceed WUWM Aug. 10, 2011 UW-Madison political scientist David Canon says there were few surprises in Tuesday’s recall elections. He shared his observations with WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl.
  • Stock Market Plunge Causes Uncertainty For Investors WISC-TV 3 Aug. 9, 2011 Quoted: Ken Kavajecz, associate professor of finance at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Business, said there are lots of mixed signals to which Wall Street just doesn’t know how to react.