UW-Madison in the Media

A selection of media coverage about the university and its people.

  • Creating Artificial Intelligence Based on the Real Thing New York Times Dec. 6, 2011 Quoted: “We have this fantastic network of specialists who talk to each other,” said Giulio Tononi, a psychiatrist and neuroscientist at the University of Wisconsin. “It focuses our thinking as neuroscientists and guides the thinking of the computer scientists.”
  • UW-Madison could have office in China by June Wisconsin State Journal Dec. 5, 2011 A UW-Madison office in Shanghai could be open as soon as June, according to officials who just returned from a trip to China to explore the possibility of the university’s first foreign outpost. Gilles Bousquet, dean of the division of international studies and vice provost for globalization, said that would be the "ideal" timeline but it hinges on continued support here and getting the necessary permits in China. He said UW-Madison is convening a planning team to determine next actions.
  • UW Students Handing Out Microloans In Madison WISC-TV 3 Nov. 28, 2011 A new group has been formed to try to give a helping hand to people in Madison who may not be able to be helped through traditional lending practices.
  • WID receives highest environmental certification ahead of first anniversary Daily Cardinal Dec. 1, 2011 The Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery has received the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold certification in time for its one-year anniversary Friday.
  • Scans Reveal Differences in Psychopathic Brains U.S. News and World Report Nov. 30, 2011 Differences seen in the structure and function of psychopaths’ brains could help explain their often callous and impulsive anti-social behavior, U.S. researchers report.
  • Students give back, combat hunger Badger Herald Dec. 1, 2011 For many University of Wisconsin students, the holiday spirit has translated into efforts to team up with local food pantries and combat the growing problem of hunger in the Madison area.
  • Pair loans money to put dent in poverty Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Nov. 28, 2011 Taking a cue from the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, two University of Wisconsin-Madison juniors are aiming to lift people out of poverty by lending them money. The Madison Fund, founded by Alex Rosenthal and Andrew Tapper, recently made its first loan to a local man who used the money to apply for U.S. citizenship. The man found the not-for-profit organization by doing a Google search, said Rosenthal, the fund’s co-founder and executive director.
  • Using cutting-edge technology, UW leads the way in weather forecasting Wisconsin State Journal Nov. 27, 2011
  • Chazen offers big city vibe Wisconsin State Journal Nov. 25, 2011 If you haven’t been down to see the new and elaborate Chazen Museum of Art on the UW-Madison campus, it’s well worth the visit. You’ll appreciate not only its diverse and impressive collections of paintings, sculptures and carvings — including some contemporary Wisconsin art — but also its contribution to the urban fabric of our great city. Step inside and you’ll think you’re in Chicago or even New York. The big city vibe is unmistakable and provides another engaging attraction for residents and visitors Downtown.
  • Psychopaths aren't just mentally different - their brains prevent them feeling fear or guilt Daily Mail (UK) Nov. 23, 2011 Psychopaths such as Hannibal Lecter - Anthony Hopkins’ character in the film The Silence of the Lambs - are callous, anti-social and sometimes violent. They are incapable of feeling empathy or guilt.
  • Shop-local movement gains support Wausau Daily Herald Nov. 18, 2011 Noted: Although no comprehensive data exist proving that people are turning to local merchants -- and will continue to do so this holiday shopping season -- Garrett and Cynthia Jasper, a University of Wisconsin-Madison professor and retail and consumer expert, said the trend is noticeable.
  • Gilles Bousquet: International education is critical Wisconsin State Journal Nov. 17, 2011 International education is more than learning a second language or becoming well-versed in world geography. In today’s new economy, it is all about preparing our young people to live, work, lead and compete in an interconnected, interdependent world. In a word, it is about employability. It also is about making sure that home-grown employers — private, public and nonprofit alike — can locally recruit the talent they need to fuel their growth in today’s increasingly global marketplace.
  • Malaria vs. Mankind: Chemicals, Conservation And An Ancient Arms Race Huffington Post Nov. 17, 2011 Quoted: "New medical interventions, bed net programs, trials of a malaria vaccine -- these are all wonderful developments," Jonathan Patz, director of global environmental health at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, tells HuffPost. "But too often we ignore the root causal factors for why we even have malaria in a location."
  • Citizen Dave: LaMarr Billups, a man of integrity and principle Isthmus Nov. 15, 2011 Had he wanted to do it, we would have had a Mayor LaMarr Billups administration over the last eight years instead of mine.
  • A Busy Love Life, Built With a Mother’s Help New York Times Nov. 15, 2011 The muriqui monkeys of the Atlantic Forest in Brazil, a highly endangered species numbering only about 1,000, live in an egalitarian society.
  • Money-Saving Strategies for Holiday Shopping Wall Street Journal Nov. 14, 2011 Quoted: "Make your smartphone your shopping buddy," says Deborah Mitchell, executive director for the Center of Brand and Product Management at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • UW Cinematheque leads a growing downtown film scene Isthmus Nov. 14, 2011 It’s been a good year for the University of Wisconsin-Madison Cinematheque, and also for its first director of programming, Jim Healy.
  • Newly Released Transcripts Show a Bitter and Cynical Nixon in ’75 New York Times Nov. 11, 2011 Noted: Stanley J. Kutler, a historian whose years of litigation helped lead to the release of the material, said he expected no shocking revelations from Nixon’s testimony. But the hours of Nixon talking and sparring are a window on the personality of the 37th president.
  • Amid construction, UW-Madison protects 70-year-old works Isthmus Nov. 11, 2011 Murals by celebrated regionalist John Steuart Curry are getting exceptional attention on campus, though the public can’t tell so far.
  • International Turmoil Threatens U.S. Export Boom Wall Street Journal Nov. 11, 2011 Quoted: "There’s a knock-on effect," said Menzie Chinn, an economics professor at the University of Wisconsin. "If you have a big financial conflagration, that has repercussions that are extremely hard to predict."
  • Organic Isn't Always Safer When It Comes To Botulism National Public Radio Nov. 8, 2011 Quoted: "It’s the perfect environment for botulinum to grow," says Eric Johnson, a professor of microbiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • The rise of an economic superpower: What does China want? Christian Science Monitor Nov. 7, 2011 Noted: Edward Friedman, a political science professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, echoes some other observers when he goes so far as to call China’s rise "the greatest challenge to freedom in the world since World War I" aimed at "making the world safe for authoritarianism." But does China really want to overturn the US-led post-World War II international order – the very system that has allowed the country to flourish so remarkably? And if the men at the top of the Chinese Communist Party are indeed so minded, could they, or those who come after them, ever succeed?
  • Bleak Portrait of Poverty Is Off the Mark, Experts Say New York Times Nov. 4, 2011 Quoted: “That’s a big difference,” said Timothy Smeeding, an economist at the University of Wisconsin who oversaw the study in that state. “It’s about time we started counting the programs we use to fight poverty.”
  • Secret To A Long, Healthy Life: Bike To The Store National Public Radio Nov. 3, 2011 What would you say to a cheap, easy way to stay slim, one that would help avoid serious illness and early death? How about if it made your neighbors healthier, too? It could be as simple as biking to the store.
  • San Antonio native, UW student excels in Madison Madison Times Nov. 3, 2011 “It’s quite a bit colder here in Wisconsin than it is in San Antonio,” smiles Mathew Mireles, an outstanding graduate student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music who is in his third year of a Doctor of Musical Arts degree program. “But over the last couple of years I’ve started to get used to it a bit.” Mireles is an award-winning euphonium player and instructor who has been slowly getting accustomed to Madison and Wisconsin.
  • UW researchers to study, address global health problems Wisconsin State Journal Oct. 31, 2011 Mangoes are Haiti’s largest export, but the country imports mango juice."It doesn’t make sense," said Gergens Polynice, a UW-Madison research assistant from Haiti. "How can we process the foods in Haiti and take advantage of the local market?"
  • 'Lost Decades' explains what damaged the U.S. economy USA Today Oct. 31, 2011 More than three years after a global financial near-meltdown ground a decades-long era of prosperity to a halt, the United States economy is still reeling.
  • UW students carry load of Walker's budget cuts Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Oct. 28, 2011 In the midst of a crushing economic downturn, our elected state leaders crafted a two-year budget that reflected tough choices, including $250 million in reduced state funding for the University of Wisconsin System. Facing that daunting budget gap, we began the year at UW institutions by confronting tough choices of our own. The funding gap was covered through hundreds of cost-cutting decisions, all of which affect our core educational mission and our UW students. Higher tuition bills, never a desirable option, helped offset less than one-third of the state reductions. [A column by UW System President Kevin Reilley and UW System campus chancellors.]
  • UW, federal scientists identify fungus that's killing bats Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Oct. 27, 2011 When bats in northeastern America began dying off in alarming numbers a few years ago, wildlife ecologists were perplexed. They named the disease white-nose syndrome, but until now authorities had no idea what caused the fatal ailment. Researchers in Wisconsin have discovered the culprit is a fungus that’s common in Europe but wasn’t seen in the United States until five years ago. Now that the cause has been determined, officials can turn their attention to stopping the spread of the disease.
  • Are Crackdowns A Turning Point For Occupy Protests? National Public Radio Oct. 27, 2011 Quoted: While video of the confrontation has flooded YouTube, it may do little to settle the question of who did what to whom, says Pamela Oliver, a sociology professor at the University of Wisconsin.How you are going to view the situation is always up for grabs. Police and protesters will both try to shape perceptions in their favor.