UW-Madison in the Media

A selection of media coverage about the university and its people.

  • 'Lost Decades' explains what damaged the U.S. economy USA Today Oct. 31, 2011 More than three years after a global financial near-meltdown ground a decades-long era of prosperity to a halt, the United States economy is still reeling.
  • UW students carry load of Walker's budget cuts Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Oct. 28, 2011 In the midst of a crushing economic downturn, our elected state leaders crafted a two-year budget that reflected tough choices, including $250 million in reduced state funding for the University of Wisconsin System. Facing that daunting budget gap, we began the year at UW institutions by confronting tough choices of our own. The funding gap was covered through hundreds of cost-cutting decisions, all of which affect our core educational mission and our UW students. Higher tuition bills, never a desirable option, helped offset less than one-third of the state reductions. [A column by UW System President Kevin Reilley and UW System campus chancellors.]
  • UW, federal scientists identify fungus that's killing bats Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Oct. 27, 2011 When bats in northeastern America began dying off in alarming numbers a few years ago, wildlife ecologists were perplexed. They named the disease white-nose syndrome, but until now authorities had no idea what caused the fatal ailment. Researchers in Wisconsin have discovered the culprit is a fungus that’s common in Europe but wasn’t seen in the United States until five years ago. Now that the cause has been determined, officials can turn their attention to stopping the spread of the disease.
  • Are Crackdowns A Turning Point For Occupy Protests? National Public Radio Oct. 27, 2011 Quoted: While video of the confrontation has flooded YouTube, it may do little to settle the question of who did what to whom, says Pamela Oliver, a sociology professor at the University of Wisconsin.How you are going to view the situation is always up for grabs. Police and protesters will both try to shape perceptions in their favor.
  • For Wisconsin’s Bielema, Tough Times Become Motivators to Success New York Times Oct. 26, 2011 The morning after Coach Bret Bielema led Wisconsin to one of the biggest wins in his program’s history, an Oct. 1 blowout of then-No. 8 Nebraska that confirmed the Badgers’ status as a national title contender, he began crying in his office.
  • Chazen Museum supporters celebrate debut of additional art space Wisconsin State Journal Oct. 24, 2011 Five-year-old Sarah Best admitted she was a little scared when she first crossed the new yellow glass walkway over the lobby at the Chazen Museum of Art. "When you look down, it looks like you’re falling," she said. But by the time Sarah had crossed six, eight or 10 times, she seemed quite comfortable with the tempered glass bridge in the newly expanded museum. Sarah and her family were among the crowd that attended Saturday’s open house celebrating the $43 million expansion of the museum on the UW-Madison campus.
  • UW's Go Big Read selection tells a harrowing immigration story Isthmus Oct. 21, 2011 Enrique’s Journey is this year’s Go Big Read selection — the book chosen by the UW-Madison to spark a community-wide discussion. Sonia Nazario’s Pulitzer-winning story is the epitome of long-form enterprise journalism, first published as a 30,000-word Los Angeles Times series. It has since been expanded in book form and translated into eight languages. The book, about a Honduran boy who travels — on top of trains — to reach his mother in the United States, has found a broad audience on both sides of ongoing immigration debates.
  • Selig to retire to Madison to write memoirs on UW campus Wisconsin State Journal Oct. 19, 2011 As the World Series begins, the most powerful man in baseball readies a nest in Madison for retirement. It contains bubble gum, pretzels, a basket of baseballs and a cable connection to Major League Baseball’s TV channel. Allan H. "Bud" Selig has charmed the UW-Madison history department, paid a million-plus for a professor to teach the history of sports and had scholarships created in his honor. His new office in the Humanities Building is cozy and modest. The effect of his presence will be the opposite.
  • UW-Madison nuclear expert sees implications for US in Fukushima disaster Wisconsin State Journal Oct. 18, 2011 The energy policy fallout from the disaster last March at Japan’s Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear plant has caused everything from the shutdown of nuclear programs in Germany to re-evaluations of plant designs and disaster plans here in the United States, according to UW-Madison expert Michael Corradini. Corradini, a professor of nuclear engineering, spoke at the annual Engineers' Day seminar in the College of Engineering. He also serves as co-chairman of an American Nuclear Society committee that studied the Fukushima disaster. In the U.S., Corradini said, nuclear plants are being required to review disaster plans. But nuclear energy will remain a part of the nation's energy mix, he added, with older plants such as those in Wisconsin being upgraded to generate more power and a half-dozen new plants being built in the next couple of years.
  • Occupy Wall Street Protest Lacks an Anthem New York Times Oct. 19, 2011 Quoted: Alexander Shashko, who teaches a music history course at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, said that protest songs historically derived power from the social or political movements that adopted them, and that the main political movement to rise from the economic crash had been the Tea Party, the conservative antitax group.
  • Slow Food quickly gaining fans on campus Wisconsin State Journal Oct. 18, 2011 Every Wednesday around lunchtime, crowds line the stairs leading to the basement of the University United Methodist Church. It’s food, not faith, that draws the throng. That said, there’s a distinctly reverent vibe at The Café, where a weekly meal is served to the public by Slow Food UW Madison, a university-based club with a city-approved restaurant license.
  • Editorial: 150 Years Of UW Alumni WISC-TV 3 Oct. 14, 2011 This weekend, the Wisconsin Alumni Association is throwing a little party to celebrate its 150th anniversary. My hunch is if you wanted a ticket to the bash you could still get one, but don’t quote me -- call the WAA. But some 700 or so alumni are planning to don their red party duds at a celebration at the Institutes for Discovery that will among other things raise up to 150-thousand dollars for scholarships. But what this is really about is school pride. It’s about being one of an estimated 380,000 UW alumni around the world who support the UW and its mission, promote the contributions of fellow alumni and work together to do some good in this world.
  • New cell phone app developed at UW helps identify birds Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Oct. 12, 2011 Is that the call of a black-capped chickadee, or some kind of a sparrow? The answer may soon be in the palm of your hand. A new smart phone app now in development at the University of Wisconsin-Madison could help the armchair bird watcher identify the calls of many more birds.
  • With extra year as UW chancellor, David Ward is ready to take on big stuff Capital Times Oct. 12, 2011 ....By adding a year, Ward appears to have morphed from a trusty caretaker into a fully empowered leader poised to initiate and guide major changes in UW-Madison’s finances and operations — including its personnel system — in one of the most challenging periods of its 163-year history. To Ward, Reilly and the many UW constituencies eager for Ward to stay longer, this change appears to be a big deal in the labyrinthine culture of campus politics and decision-making.
  • Editorial: UW-Madison gets welcome re-Ward Wisconsin State Journal Oct. 10, 2011 UW-Madison benefited from a promising development last week: David Ward’s appointment as interim chancellor was extended to the summer of 2013.
  • Editorial: A helpful tool Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Oct. 11, 2011 Wisconsin has two related problems when it comes to four-year college degrees. It doesn’t have enough people with such degrees. And it takes too long in many instances to get a four-year degree - while students and their families spend too much money.
  • Another great team Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Oct. 6, 2011 This is Wisconsin at its best: A team that includes the state’s four largest engineering schools and several large Milwaukee-area employers is working on a new project that aims to make Wisconsin a leader in the creation of "microgrids," energy islands that can function off a main power grid.
  • A.C. Nielsen Jr., Who Transformed Research Firm, Dies at 92 New York Times Oct. 5, 2011 Arthur C. Nielsen Jr., who transformed the company his father founded in 1923 into an international leader in market research, helping to make its name synonymous with television ratings, died on Monday in Winnetka, Ill., where he lived most of his life. He was 92. He was a graduate of the University of Wisconsin.
  • Addison Trail Freshmen head to college for unique program Chicago Tribune Oct. 5, 2011 From the time he learned to read, Alex Avalos’ parents told him he would someday go to college to create a better life for himself. The first glimmer of that day arrived last week, although not in the way Avalos expected, as the 14-year-old Addison Trail High School freshman visited the University of Wisconsin- Madison campus with 99 of his classmates.
  • Facebook Photos of Drunken Students May Indicate Real Alcohol Problems, Study Says ABCNEWS.com Oct. 5, 2011 College students who post the details of their drunken nights on Facebook can end up with a few problems on their hands – embarrassment, regret or explanations to mom and dad. But a new study from researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison suggests those Facebook postings may also signal that a student is at clinical risk of having a drinking problem.
  • What I Do: Aldo Leopold inspired Scott Craven to become wildlife specialist Wisconsin State Journal Oct. 4, 2011 "People of all ages love wildlife and have a curiosity about different types of animals. One of the nicest aspects of my career has been to respond to their questions about what types of animals they’ve seen. I responded to between 1,000 to 2,000 questions per year from the public," says Craven, a UW Extension wildlife specialist and UW-Madison professor emeritus of forest and wildlife ecology.
  • 'Microgrids' energy storage project announced Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Oct. 4, 2011 Microgrids will be set up at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2012 and at UW-Madison’s new Wisconsin Energy Institute Building, scheduled to open in 2013, according to the initiative by the Center for Renewable Energy Systems. The Center aims to conduct applied research to help Wisconsin companies develop projects for the renewable energy and energy storage markets.
  • Wilson and Wisconsin Run Down Nebraska, 48-17 New York Times Oct. 2, 2011 MADISON, Wis. — On his first day on the Wisconsin campus this summer after transferring from North Carolina State, Wisconsin quarterback Russell Wilson called his own team meeting. He delivered a short and simple message to his new teammates: he had come to work hard and compete. But just the simple act of introducing himself to his teammates and acknowledging that nothing would be handed to him spoke to his savvy and maturity.
  • With Nebraska in Town, Wisconsin Gets Ready to Jump New York Times Oct. 1, 2011 When Nebraska travels to Wisconsin for its Big Ten inauguration Saturday night, the game will resonate as a cultural event as much as a sporting contest. Wisconsin is bracing for the presence of some 30,000 Nebraska fans in Madison this weekend, many of whom do not have tickets and are just tagging along for the revelry and history.
  • Tickets or no tickets, Nebraska fans migrating for inaugural Big Ten game at No. 7 Wisconsin Washington Post Sept. 29, 2011 Wisconsin officials tout Saturday night’s game against Nebraska as the toughest ticket ever at 94-year-old Camp Randall Stadium.
  • State, cranberry industry look to capitalize on growing demand in China Wausau Daily Herald Sept. 29, 2011 CRANMOOR -- Gong Ruina, a graduate student at Beijing Sport University and world-champion badminton player, said harvesting cranberries is more difficult than it looks.
  • Nebraska fans expected to come to Wisconsin in full force Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Sept. 27, 2011 Barry Alvarez’s memory teems with Camp Randall Stadium moments. They’ve accumulated over the last 21-plus years - 16 as football coach and five-plus as full-time athletic director:The back-to-back games against Michigan and Ohio State in the 1993 Rose Bowl season; the victory over Penn State in ’98 to clinch another trip to Pasadena; the victory over Iowa in ’99, which brought another Big Ten Conference title and a national rushing record for Ron Dayne; and the upset of No. 1 Ohio State last season. Nebraska’s visit to Madison this week, the Cornhuskers’ first Big Ten game, could rise to the top of that list.
  • For University of Wisconsin, New Facebook Fans Pay Off New York Times Sept. 21, 2011 The value of a follower on Twitter or Facebook can be nebulous – unless you’re the University of Wisconsin, Madison, this month.
  • Editorial: Ward welcome for one more year Daily Cardinal Sept. 22, 2011 The question surrounding Interim Chancellor David Ward’s term length recently surfaced as UW-Madison’s University Committee requested he stay an additional year. While the interim position is only allotted a single-year term during a search and screen process, members of the UW faculty argue Ward’s background, collegiate experience and national insight put him in the best position to lead UW-Madison through Wisconsin’s rocky political climate.
  • Editorial: University of Wisconsin-Madison policy right to promote diversity Appleton Post-Crescent Sept. 19, 2011 Every so often, a group calls out the University of Wisconsin-Madison for having an admissions policy that takes into account factors other than academics — such as race.