UW-Madison in the Media

A selection of media coverage about the university and its people.

  • Beloved engineering dean reveals plans for retirement Badger Herald Feb. 9, 2012 University of Wisconsin College of Engineering Dean Paul Peercy will leave a 13-year tenure at UW behind when he retires in the coming months, he announced Wednesday.
  • Are Mexican Voters Ready For Their First Presidenta? Forbes Feb. 7, 2012 Quoted: “Women will be important given they are just over half the population,” adds Christina Ewig, Ph.D., an associate professor of Gender & Women’s Studies and Political Science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “Women in Mexico have historically tended to support the PRI, but in recent elections some women have shifted to the PAN.  Getting more women to shift to the PAN may be part of the strategy of nominating Vásquez Mota.”
  • Give UW the freedom to manage its own affairs Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Feb. 6, 2012 The furor that erupted a year ago over who should control the state’s flagship University of Wisconsin campus has given way to sober realism about how best to fund and manage the state’s universities. That discussion resumes this week in Madison, and this time, with any luck, a reasonable solution will emerge that gives the state’s two largest campuses more freedom to run their own affairs as state funding dwindles. The shame of last year’s implosion of a plan advanced secretly by former UW-Madison Chancellor Biddy Martin was not that the plan was scotched. It deserved to be scotched. The shame was that cuts to the university system were put in place without giving the campuses the degree of flexibility they needed to manage those cuts.
  • A degree in nonprofits from UW-Madison and Madison College Isthmus Feb. 2, 2012 The days of just getting together with friends to put on a show or sell a few burgers for charity are on their way out. In these tough financial times, nonprofits have to become increasingly professional to survive.
  • White House office studies educational benefits of video games USA Today Feb. 1, 2012 If you’re training for a new job someday soon with a video game controller in your hands, thank Constance Steinkuehler. Steinkuehler is on an 18-month assignment at the White House, studying the civic potential of video games.
  • Whoopensocker dictionary of American dialect completed after 50 years Guardian (UK) Feb. 1, 2012 From whoopensocker to upscuddle, strubbly to swivet, 50 years after it was first conceived the Dictionary of American Regional English is finally about to reach the end of the alphabet.
  • Stiemsma's battle with depression, and the man who saved him New England Cable News Jan. 31, 2012 The curtains were drawn and the door was shut, blocking out the rest of the world. Inside, Greg Stiemsma lay in bed while the TV flickered, the noise falling on deaf ears as he watched the monitor without processing the program.
  • Ask the Weather Guys: What is Groundhog Day and do the forecasts work? Wisconsin State Journal Jan. 30, 2012 A. Long before computers, the Weather Channel and the Internet, humans needed weather forecasts. Farmers and sailors particularly needed to know if storms were approaching. Over time, various folklore forecasts, often in the form of short rhymes, were devised and passed down through the generations. Although memorable, the folklore forecasts are of uneven quality — some good, others bad. Groundhog Day is an example of predicting the weather based on folklore. If the groundhog comes out of its hole and sees its shadow, we are in store for 40 more days of winter.
  • Gains in DNA Are Speeding Research Into Human Origins New York Times Jan. 31, 2012 Quoted: John Hawks, a paleoanthropologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, whose lab is examining the archaic genomes, visited the cave in July. It has a high arched roof like a Gothic cathedral and a chimney to the sky, he said, adding that being there was like walking in the footsteps of our ancestors.
  • UW student's 'It Gets Better' video goes viral Wisconsin State Journal Jan. 27, 2012 A UW-Madison student and filmmaker wants bullied teens to know that life gets better after high school. UW-Madison senior Colton Boettcher unveiled a music video on Thursday, Jan. 26, that promotes the message of the "It Gets Better" Project, an Internet-based support group for LGBT teens that arose after a series of gay teen suicides in 2010.
  • Women’s hockey draws record-setting crowd to ‘Fill the Bowl’ Badger Herald Jan. 30, 2012 In front of a record-setting crowd, the Wisconsin women’s hockey team continued to make plain why it’s considered the nation’s best week in and week out.
  • 'Bridesmaids' Gets Two Oscar Nominations, Comedy Pros Weigh In International Business Times Jan. 26, 2012 Quoted: "It’s a pity how comedy is often seen as culturally suspicious when awards season comes around," Jonathan Gray, a professor of media and cultural studies at the University of Wisconsin- Madison, wrote in an email. "I’m pleased to see comedies nominated, but under no illusion that Hollywood and The Oscars won’t simply go back to business as usual."
  • Kawaoka: Flu transmission work is urgent Nature Jan. 26, 2012 Yoshihiro Kawaoka explains that research on transmissible avian flu viruses needs to continue if pandemics are to be prevented.
  • Obama has had rare run of luck with elite SEAL operations USA Today Jan. 26, 2012 Quoted: John Hall, a military historian at the University of Wisconsin, noted that special operations forces have been around since World War II, but they were initially designed to be stay-behind forces in Eastern Europe, a response to the Soviet Union.
  • Google boggling our brains? Study says humans use internet as their main 'memory' Daily Mail (UK) Jan. 25, 2012 The Internet is becoming our main source of memory instead of our own brains, a study has concluded. In the age of Google, our minds are adapting so that we are experts at knowing where to find information even though we don’t recall what it is.
  • Disability center tailors missions Badger Herald Jan. 23, 2012 Despite having recently moved to a new location in a more populated and accessible area on campus, the McBurney Disability Center and its staffers behind the scenes are still mysteries to a sizeable population at the University of Wisconsin.
  • UW women's hockey: Ammerman's brilliant career has gone largely unnoticed Madison.com Jan. 20, 2012 Brooke Ammerman is one of the most accomplished players in the history of the University of Wisconsin women’s hockey program, but you’ve never seen the senior right winger on its marquee. She scored the winning goal in two NCAA championship games — in 2009 vs. Mercyhurst and in ’11 vs. Boston University — but has never been an All-American. She is closing in on 200 points for her career — a plateau only three players in program history occupy — but has never been a first-team All-Western Collegiate Hockey Association.
  • Agriculture and Climate Change, Revisited New York Times Jan. 20, 2012 Quoted: In an interview, Molly Jahn, a plant breeder at the University of Wisconsin, said the research also needs to focus on ways to help the poorest people, who will not necessarily come out as winners if agricultural systems in developing countries become more sophisticated. Virtually everywhere it has happened, that transition has involved larger farms, more capital — and fewer farmers.
  • Algonquin late bloomer now a Rhodes scholar Chicago Daily Herald Jan. 19, 2012 When English major Alexis Brown realized there was no place where she could submit her undergraduate essays for publication, she decided there was only one solution — create one from scratch.
  • Pilot E-Textbook Program at Five Universities Focuses on Bulk Savings, not iBooks New York Times Jan. 20, 2012 There is a revolution brewing in the way college students buy and read textbooks. And, perhaps surprisingly, it does not center entirely on Apple’s announcement on Thursday about new textbook technology on iBooks 2.
  • San Francisco backup quarterback Scott Tolzien gets 49ers ready Los Angeles Times Jan. 20, 2012 In the last two weeks, Scott Tolzien of the San Francisco 49ers has thrown for more than 10,000 yards. And he’s never taken a snap in an NFL game.
  • Doug Moe: Famous geneticist James Crow remained engaged until his death at 95 Wisconsin State Journal Jan. 17, 2012 The note came early last month, and I couldn’t have been happier. "Hi Doug," the email began. "On the small chance that you missed it, today’s New York Times reports Awonder Liang just won the 8-year-old world chess championship. I remember your playing with him some time ago. "It was signed, "Jim." I was happy because I was always happy to hear from Jim Crow. This in no way made me unique. James F. Crow was known around the world as a great scientist, tops in his field — genetics. But his wide circle of friends knew him as a warm, generous, humorous man with many and varied interests. You couldn't ask for better company.
  • Stressed? Call Mom, Researchers Conclude ABCNEWS.com Jan. 13, 2012 Moms feed us, read to us, clap the loudest, cry the hardest, sit front row at recorder recitals, write notes in our lunchboxes and promise that the hole in our hearts after a break-up won’t stay there forever.
  • University of Wisconsin brings hip-hop from the street to the classroom USA Today College Jan. 14, 2012 Imagine learning to beatbox and breakdance in a college class. Imagine watching lectures and performances by hip-hop artists like Chuck D and Janelle Monáe as program requirements. Students studying as a part of the University of Wisconsin’s First Wave program don’t have to imagine. It’s what they do.
  • Texans’ J.J. Watt Makes Play as Big as His Dreams New York Times Jan. 11, 2012 HOUSTON — Only three years ago, J. J. Watt was delivering pizzas, mopping floors and being picked at like a leftover pepperoni pie by doubters who scoffed at his football dreams.
  • Q&A: UW-Madison seeks to improve student advising services Capital Times Jan. 9, 2012 When students are asked to rate various aspects of UW-Madison, its academic and career advising services consistently rank as a problem area. "It’s typical across the country that students will rate advising lower than other things," says UW-Madison’s Wren Singer. "So we’re not alone in that but the university is committed to addressing this issue."
  • UW scientists hope to unlock cosmic secrets with dynamo experiment Wisconsin State Journal Jan. 9, 2012 Scientists could better understand how solar flares disrupt cellphone calls, wipe out power grids and knock out satellites, thanks to an aluminum sphere at UW-Madison that resembles the Death Star from "Star Wars." The 11,000-pound hollow vessel, built to stir gas at 500,000 degrees Fahrenheit and replicate the process that creates the sun’s magnetic field, was installed this week in Sterling Hall.
  • Susie Earley: UW's Young, Crow fondly remembered Wisconsin State Journal Jan. 9, 2012 Former UW-Madison Chancellor Edwin Young and professor James Crow died a few days apart this week. For those of us who grew up in a post-World War II neighborhood on the West Side near Hoyt Park, when Sunset Point looked out at farms, they were the last of our fathers. We have been reminiscing via the Internet. Growing up, we all knew the UW faculty was working hard to revive and make this a great university. We all salute the contributions of these two great men.
  • Bowl ad deftly boosts UW-Madison to nation Capital Times Jan. 3, 2012 A sophisticated new ad about the University of Wisconsin-Madison to air during the Rose Bowl telecast is a cutting-edge effort, featuring UW’s development of disease-resistant crops, the first micro motor and research in Antarctica.
  • Rose Bowl gives UW positive national exposure in branding, licensing Wisconsin State Journal Dec. 30, 2011 Football may be the primary focus of the Rose Bowl, but UW-Madison officials admit they have ulterior motives when they leave Friday for Southern California.