UW-Madison in the Media

A selection of media coverage about the university and its people.

  • Longevity Up in U.S., but Education Creates Disparity, Study Says New York Times April 3, 2012 Americans are living longer, but the gains in life span are accruing disproportionately among the better educated, according to a new report by researchers from the University of Wisconsin.
  • Paul S. Boyer, 78, Who Wrote About A-Bomb and Witches, Dies New York Times April 2, 2012 Paul S. Boyer, an intellectual historian who wrote groundbreaking studies of the Salem witch trials, the history of apocalyptic movements and the response of the American public to the nuclear annihilation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, died on March 17 in Madison, Wis. He was 78.
  • The Role of Reality in Prices - Room for Debate New York Times April 2, 2012 In the typical introductory textbook, wages and prices adjust so that labor is fully employed and goods are sold at the right price. A more sophisticated treatment shows up in more advanced texts, but even in some graduate texts, there is an emphasis on the self-correcting aspects of the modern macroeconomy. [A column by Menzie Chinn, economics and public affairs professor at UW-Madison.]
  • Whitehead didn't fear our dark side Milwaukee Journal Sentinel March 28, 2012 A University of Wisconsin-Madison anthropology professor who fearlessly studied the dark side of humanity - even when it endangered his life - will be remembered during a memorial service Wednesday for his willingness to explore taboo, his love of intellectual back-and-forth, and the admiration and affection he inspired among colleagues and students.
  • Hard freeze would be disastrous for orchards, insects, birds Appleton Post-Crescent March 28, 2012 Noted: Insects also are coming out four to five weeks ahead of schedule, said Phil Pelletteri, a University of Wisconsin-Madison entomologist. Not included among those early emergers, however, are mosquitoes, he added, which need spring rains to breed and hatch.
  • Lying online dating: Online daters who lie in their profiles leave clues in their writing Chicago Tribune March 28, 2012 Fibs are common in online dating profiles. An inch taller, a few pounds lighter, and you might just get that first coffee date. But liars beware: Subconscious quirks in how you write a profile may give you away, according to a study published in February in the journal Communication.
  • Bird Flu Studies Getting Another Round Of Scrutiny By Panel NPR Morning Edition March 26, 2012 In June of 2009, a committee met at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to do a routine safety review of proposed research projects.One of those projects involved genetically modifying flu viruses. And during the review, the committee brought up the idea of "dual-use" research. "Dual use" means legitimate scientific work that’s intended to advance science or medicine, but that also might be misused with the intent to do harm.
  • In Clintonville, Wis., the Ground is Going Bump in the Night New York Times March 23, 2012 Quoted: “Microearthquakes in general happen all the time, all over the world, but we’ve never had one specifically detected in Wisconsin, especially a whole series of them like what we have been seeing going on Clintonville,” said Harold J. Tobin, a professor of geoscience at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who has been helping to diagnose the mysterious pounding.
  • Yes, Those Were Mosquitoes WUWM-FM, Milwaukee March 20, 2012 If you heard the unmistakable whine of a mosquito this past weekend or smashed one as it drilled into your arm, it was not your imagination.UW-Madison bug expert Phil Pellitteri says more than 50 species of mosquitoes buzz around Wisconsin, including one type that never disappears.
  • Daydreaming Makes You Smarter Gizmodo March 20, 2012 At high school, it’s invariably the kids that day dream who get told off. But a new study suggests that it’s those of us whose minds wander that have the best working memory—and working memory is itself directly associated to intelligence. A new study, conducted by the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Science, suggests that a person’s working memory capacity relates to the tendency of their mind to wander during routine tasks. Working memory is the capacity to remember information for short periods of time—say, remembering a number while you dig out your phone.
  • Craig Werner: Exploring Bruce Springsteen's America Huffington Post March 20, 2012 Every Tuesday and Thursday morning, I spend 75 minutes listening to and talking about Bruce Springsteen with twenty 19- and 20-year-old freshmen at the University of Wisconsin. When the class (technically titled "Bruce Springsteen’s America") began, most the students didn’t know much of Springsteen’s music beyond "Born in the U.S.A." and "Born to Run." The most common explanation for why they signed up for the class was something like "my parents are crazy about Bruce and I’d kinda like to know why." They’re smart, engaged, a bit more urban and geographically diverse than the average UW class. (New York City, Long Island, Los Angeles, Houston, Chicago, Pittsburg, and China via Queens, in addition to our standard upper Midwestern mix). I’ll introduce you to a few of them in a minute.
  • UW students enjoy warm weather WKOW-TV 27 March 15, 2012 If there was ever a day to show off student life, the amenities of campus, and the scholastics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wednesday would be the day.
  • Art Museums Augment Some Courses at Universities New York Times March 15, 2012 In October, the University of Wisconsin opened a $47.2 million, 81,000-square-foot addition to the Chazen Museum of Art in Madison. The museum’s academic outreach program includes a project with Steven A. Ackerman, a professor of atmospheric and oceanic sciences, who teaches an introductory course on weather.
  • Science, Faith and Politics Clash Over Wolves in Wisconsin New York Times March 13, 2012 The original goal, set once it was clear that wolves were coming back in the state, on their own, was 350 wolves. With protection, the wolf population has grown to about 800. Adrian Treves, an associate professor of environmental studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, says that the carrying capacity of the state is probably about 1,000.
  • Louisiana dialects preserved in Dictionary of American Regional English New Orleans Times-Picayune March 12, 2012 It was 1967. August Rubrecht, 26, had just finished his course work for his graduate degree in Medieval English at the University of Florida. He was casting about for a thesis topic when Fred Cassidy, an English professor at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, offered him a chance to become a field worker for a project, then in its infancy, to create a dictionary of dialects of American English.
  • Neutrinos could help explain missing antimatter New Scientist March 12, 2012 Neutrinos produced by a nuclear reactor in China are changing from one flavour to another more rapidly than expected. The result means physicists could soon explain why the universe is filled with matter instead of featureless radiation.
  • Crippled Japanese Reactors Face Decades Of Work NPR March 12, 2012 Quoted: "It’s a large impact economically, but given how large the whole event is, it’s a small part of it, only a few percent," says Michael Corradini, a professor of engineering physics at the University of Wisconsin. It’s in the range of 5 to 10 percent, he says.
  • When Gaming Is Good for You Wall Street Journal March 6, 2012 Quoted: "Videogames change your brain," said University of Wisconsin psychologist C. Shawn Green, who studies how electronic games affect abilities. So does learning to read, playing the piano, or navigating the streets of London, which have all been shown to change the brain’s physical structure.
  • Dictionary covers regional dialects from A to Z AP March 6, 2012 Order a sloppy Joe in North or South Dakota, and the waiter may give you a blank stare. The popular beef-on-a-bun sandwich is known to some there as a slushburger. People from parts of the West and Midwest call theirs a Spanish hamburger. And in northwest Iowa? It’s a tavern.
  • The Genetic Ripple Effect of Hardship Wall Street Journal Feb. 29, 2012 Our experiences in life dont just affect how we learn and behave, they can also mark our genes and influence our children, a growing body of research suggests. "We want to know how experiences really influence the brain," says Marilyn Essex, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin's school of medicine and public health in Madison. "What are some of the underlying biological mechanisms that can help us understand how we get from the early stress to the later health outcomes?"
  • Dictionary of American Regional English Reaches Last Volume New York Times Feb. 26, 2012 Joan Houston Hall, chief editor of the Dictionary of American Regional English, still remembers the day back in the late 1990s when she typed “scrid” into Google.
  • Facebook Posts Can Offer Clues of Depression New York Times Feb. 24, 2012 Last year, researchers examined Facebook profiles of 200 students at the University of Washington and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Some 30 percent posted updates that met the American Psychiatric Association’s criteria for a symptom of depression, reporting feelings of worthlessness or hopelessness, insomnia or sleeping too much, and difficulty concentrating.
  • Frog Hair to Woolies: Dust Bunnies by 173 Other Names Wall Street Journal Feb. 23, 2012 That we can identify these words today is largely a testament to the vision of one man: Frederic Cassidy, a professor of English at the University of Wisconsin in Madison who conceived the Dictionary of American Regional English known as DARE in a 1962 speech to the American Dialect Society.
  • UW Researchers Study Yoga As Treatment For PTSD WISC-TV 3 Feb. 23, 2012 A new treatment program for post-traumatic stress disorder is under way at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that doesn’t involve drugs or traditional therapy.
  • Friends, Alumni Establish Anthony Shadid Memorial Fund at University of Wisconsin-Madison Reuters Feb. 20, 2012 In light of the tragic death and heroic work of former New York Times foreign correspondent Anthony Shadid, who died in Syria last week, friends and alumni have set up an endowment in his honor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • For University of Wisconsin, a 7-Block Front Door New York Times Feb. 15, 2012 A century after it was first proposed, a broad pedestrian corridor that will serve as a new gateway to the University of Wisconsin here is close to its final form. A seven-block pedestrian corridor links the University of Wisconsin campus in Madison to rental apartments and businesses. The corridor, called the East Campus Gateway, includes private developments, university buildings and two public gathering places, one owned by the university and the other by the city. A recent burst of construction has given students a new services center and a shopping mall geared to their needs called University Square.
  • Plenty find love online, where lies abound: Study The Times of India Feb. 14, 2012 Half of American adults know someone who found love online, and while the internet plays a more important role than before in starting relationships it is also a forum for cheating and lies that ends them, according to a survey released on Monday.
  • University issues 246 voter ID's in first three weeks Daily Cardinal Feb. 14, 2012 While the less than 250 voter ID cards issued in the last three weeks seems like a small amount on a campus of 40,000 students, one student leader said it is a decent turnout considering major elections are still nine months away.
  • UW scientists at forefront in search of elusive 'God Particle' Wisconsin State Journal Feb. 14, 2012 Sometime this year, physicists could very well announce they have confirmed the existence of a particle so important it has been dubbed the "God Particle." Its discovery would fill in a crucial missing piece of a model that, despite a few quirks, has been used for decades to explain the fundamental structure of the universe and all that it contains, including us. Standing with the scientists making that announcement will be some familiar faces to many here in our corner of the universe: researchers from UW-Madison. "We have a long history," said Francis Halzen, the physicist who leads another groundbreaking UW-Madison effort to build a neutrino detector in the Antarctic ice. "And I think a distinguished history." But the word "distinguished" hardly captures the fizz and pop, the headines and the historical reach of some of the physics that has gone on here.
  • The dictionary of tahn tawk Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Feb. 9, 2012 We’ve all heard of, if not ventured across, the soda/pop divide. In Pittsburgh, we’re close enough that it’s a day trip and doesn’t even require the wagon trains of old.