UW-Madison in the Media

A selection of media coverage about the university and its people.

  • The Daily Cardinal celebrates 120 years Daily Cardinal April 30, 2012 One hundred-twenty years of printing a daily newspaper has generated thousands of loyal writers, contributors and editors for The Daily Cardinal. That loyalty showed strong last weekend as nearly 250 alumni returned to their journalistic roots in Madison for the newspaper’s 120th anniversary celebration.
  • First-round call catches UW's Zeitler off guard Green Bay Press-Gazette April 27, 2012 It was a smaller than expected gathering to watch the NFL draft on Thursday night with former University of Wisconsin guard Kevin Zeitler.
  • Coolest jobs in tech (literally): running a South Pole data center ArsTechnica April 26, 2012 Steve Barnet is hiring, but not for an ordinary IT job. His ideal candidate "will be willing to travel to Polar and high altitude sites."
  • Doug Bradley: The Odyssey of Learning Huffington Post April 26, 2012 "When this old world starts getting me down," as the old song goes, and the usual antidotes -- family, friends, writing, and music -- can’t soothe my soul, I take comfort in knowing there’s one place I can always go that’s akin to being "Up on the Roof." And that’s my annual engagement with the inspiring students enrolled in UW-Madison’s Odyssey Project. While I’m typically there with my colleague and collaborator, Professor Craig Werner, to talk about music and the Vietnam War, I always come away from those evenings awed and stimulated by the students and their insights. My encounter this past week was no exception.
  • Talking to yourself may boost brainpower msnbc.com April 24, 2012 Talking to yourself might not mean you are crazy — it can actually benefit thinking and perception, researchers say.
  • Bo Xilai Scandal a Dilemma for Defense Lawyers American Lawyer April 24, 2012 Quoted: "Any Chinese lawyer would be extremely cautious in handling such a high-profile case," says Sida Liu, a professor of sociology and law at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who is researching Chinese criminal law and procedure. Courts in China are subservient to the party, and lawyers regarded as politically suspect often face persecution, disbarment, or even imprisonment. China also lacks clear evidentiary rules, and criminal defense lawyers in particular are vulnerable to charges that they have elicited false testimony from their clients.
  • #UWRightNow: Social media project captures 24 hours in the life of the UW campus Isthmus April 20, 2012 On Wednesday, the hottest social media ticket was the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • UW professors win Guggenheim Fellowships for research Badger Herald April 19, 2012 Two University of Wisconsin faculty members were awarded Guggenheim Fellowship Awards for “past work and exceptional promise” for future creative scholarship.
  • 'Parks & Recreation' star Nick Offerman serves up red meat between the laughs Wisconsin State Journal April 19, 2012 Nick Offerman knows how to make an entrance. The “Parks & Recreation” star had to start his show at the Wisconsin Union Theater late Wednesday night because so much of the audience was stuck in a seemingly endless will-call line.
  • How Health Care Is Changing to Emphasize Quality of Life Wall Street Journal April 16, 2012 Noted: As rankings have been released publicly over the past few years, says Patrick Remington, co-director of the program and associate dean for public health at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, media coverage of poor rankings "has gotten people to think about the health of their community not just by whether it has a high death rate or short life expectancy but maybe a place where the quality of life is not as good as it could be."
  • Getting a Big Tax Refund Means You're Doing It Wrong Wall Street Journal April 16, 2012 Noted: And what of taxpayers whose refunds end up being larger than expected? They are more likely to open savings accounts or certificates of deposit or to buy U.S. savings bonds, according to an ongoing study of low- to moderate-income taxpayers by J. Michael Collins and Nilton Porto at the University of Wisconsin.
  • Transfers increase in UW System WSAU-AM April 16, 2012 The number of college students transferring into or within the University of Wisconsin System in 2010 hit its highest level in a decade, according to a new report.
  • Making the dream of higher education a reality The Madison Times April 13, 2012 Many low-income adults have an intense yearning for higher education, but often have never been given a chance in life to obtain it. The purpose of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Odyssey Project, now in its 9th year, is to help people overcome obstacles and achieve those educational dreams.
  • State's hygiene lab tests pollutants from major historical sites Wisconsin State Journal April 11, 2012 Most people are familiar with the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene because of its routine but important work testing everything from well water for contaminants to blood samples for alcohol levels. But tucked away in various corners of the laboratory on Madison’s Far East Side are hints of a lesser-known and stranger science. Ice cores from the Greenland ice cap, for example. Scrapings from the walls of the Taj Mahal in Agra, India. Air samples from the refectory of Santa Maria Delle Grazie Church in Milan, Italy, home to Da Vinci’s "The Last Supper." Though they may seem connected, these collections have ended up in Madison because of unique and sought-after research skills for which the state laboratory is internationally known.
  • With Instagram, Facebook Gets 'Holy Grail' of Data SmartMoney.com April 11, 2012 Noted: Facebook says Instagram will remain a standalone app separate from the social networking site, but the acquisition could make it easier for marketers, advertisers and the apps and companies one “likes” to access that kind of photo information, says Deborah Mitchell, executive director for the Center of Brand and Product Management at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • New Treatments to Save a Pet, but Questions About the Costs New York Times April 10, 2012 A story about cutting-edge medicine for pets includes Lisa Forrest, a professor of oncology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison's School of Veterinary Medicine, and UW Veterinary Care's use of TomoTherapy for cancer treatment.
  • Controversial bird flu experiments produced no killer virus, scientists say Washington Post April 4, 2012 Two controversial research projects with the H5N1 bird flu virus haven’t produced a killer bug but have generated useful information, two researchers told scientists and bioethicists gathered here to talk about the benefits and pitfalls of manipulating deadly pathogens. “We can use this information to understand what’s happening in nature,” Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin told the group, which is meeting to discuss experiments on the much-feared flu strain that has infected 600 people, killing more than half of them, since 2003. He said his work is already shedding light on outbreaks in Egypt, the country with the second-largest number of H5N1 cases over that period.
  • Longevity Up in U.S., but Education Creates Disparity, Study Says New York Times April 3, 2012 Americans are living longer, but the gains in life span are accruing disproportionately among the better educated, according to a new report by researchers from the University of Wisconsin.
  • Paul S. Boyer, 78, Who Wrote About A-Bomb and Witches, Dies New York Times April 2, 2012 Paul S. Boyer, an intellectual historian who wrote groundbreaking studies of the Salem witch trials, the history of apocalyptic movements and the response of the American public to the nuclear annihilation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, died on March 17 in Madison, Wis. He was 78.
  • The Role of Reality in Prices - Room for Debate New York Times April 2, 2012 In the typical introductory textbook, wages and prices adjust so that labor is fully employed and goods are sold at the right price. A more sophisticated treatment shows up in more advanced texts, but even in some graduate texts, there is an emphasis on the self-correcting aspects of the modern macroeconomy. [A column by Menzie Chinn, economics and public affairs professor at UW-Madison.]
  • Whitehead didn't fear our dark side Milwaukee Journal Sentinel March 28, 2012 A University of Wisconsin-Madison anthropology professor who fearlessly studied the dark side of humanity - even when it endangered his life - will be remembered during a memorial service Wednesday for his willingness to explore taboo, his love of intellectual back-and-forth, and the admiration and affection he inspired among colleagues and students.
  • Hard freeze would be disastrous for orchards, insects, birds Appleton Post-Crescent March 28, 2012 Noted: Insects also are coming out four to five weeks ahead of schedule, said Phil Pelletteri, a University of Wisconsin-Madison entomologist. Not included among those early emergers, however, are mosquitoes, he added, which need spring rains to breed and hatch.
  • Lying online dating: Online daters who lie in their profiles leave clues in their writing Chicago Tribune March 28, 2012 Fibs are common in online dating profiles. An inch taller, a few pounds lighter, and you might just get that first coffee date. But liars beware: Subconscious quirks in how you write a profile may give you away, according to a study published in February in the journal Communication.
  • Bird Flu Studies Getting Another Round Of Scrutiny By Panel NPR Morning Edition March 26, 2012 In June of 2009, a committee met at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to do a routine safety review of proposed research projects.One of those projects involved genetically modifying flu viruses. And during the review, the committee brought up the idea of "dual-use" research. "Dual use" means legitimate scientific work that’s intended to advance science or medicine, but that also might be misused with the intent to do harm.
  • In Clintonville, Wis., the Ground is Going Bump in the Night New York Times March 23, 2012 Quoted: “Microearthquakes in general happen all the time, all over the world, but we’ve never had one specifically detected in Wisconsin, especially a whole series of them like what we have been seeing going on Clintonville,” said Harold J. Tobin, a professor of geoscience at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who has been helping to diagnose the mysterious pounding.
  • Yes, Those Were Mosquitoes WUWM-FM, Milwaukee March 20, 2012 If you heard the unmistakable whine of a mosquito this past weekend or smashed one as it drilled into your arm, it was not your imagination.UW-Madison bug expert Phil Pellitteri says more than 50 species of mosquitoes buzz around Wisconsin, including one type that never disappears.
  • Daydreaming Makes You Smarter Gizmodo March 20, 2012 At high school, it’s invariably the kids that day dream who get told off. But a new study suggests that it’s those of us whose minds wander that have the best working memory—and working memory is itself directly associated to intelligence. A new study, conducted by the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Science, suggests that a person’s working memory capacity relates to the tendency of their mind to wander during routine tasks. Working memory is the capacity to remember information for short periods of time—say, remembering a number while you dig out your phone.
  • Craig Werner: Exploring Bruce Springsteen's America Huffington Post March 20, 2012 Every Tuesday and Thursday morning, I spend 75 minutes listening to and talking about Bruce Springsteen with twenty 19- and 20-year-old freshmen at the University of Wisconsin. When the class (technically titled "Bruce Springsteen’s America") began, most the students didn’t know much of Springsteen’s music beyond "Born in the U.S.A." and "Born to Run." The most common explanation for why they signed up for the class was something like "my parents are crazy about Bruce and I’d kinda like to know why." They’re smart, engaged, a bit more urban and geographically diverse than the average UW class. (New York City, Long Island, Los Angeles, Houston, Chicago, Pittsburg, and China via Queens, in addition to our standard upper Midwestern mix). I’ll introduce you to a few of them in a minute.
  • UW students enjoy warm weather WKOW-TV 27 March 15, 2012 If there was ever a day to show off student life, the amenities of campus, and the scholastics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wednesday would be the day.
  • Art Museums Augment Some Courses at Universities New York Times March 15, 2012 In October, the University of Wisconsin opened a $47.2 million, 81,000-square-foot addition to the Chazen Museum of Art in Madison. The museum’s academic outreach program includes a project with Steven A. Ackerman, a professor of atmospheric and oceanic sciences, who teaches an introductory course on weather.