UW-Madison in the Media

A selection of media coverage about the university and its people.

  • Steve Stricker talks John Deere, deer hunting, being a dad & more Golf.com July 11, 2012 Noted: "It’s got a great school system. People are friendly, with those Midwestern values. Madison is a college town, so we’re big University of Wisconsin fans, even though I went to Illinois. We have season-tickets to the Badgers, so it’s fun following those basketball and football teams. It’s big enough, but yet small enough so you get to know a lot of people. It’s a great community -- if you can get past the winters. You’ve got great spring, summer and fall weather -- if you can slash it out those four months of the year. Our winters are getting better."
  • New study disputes link between Facebook and depression Daily Mail (UK) July 11, 2012 Studies have long linked Facebook to negative side-effects, including depression among adolescents. However, new research from the University of Wisconsin has found no link between social media use and the likelihood of depression.
  • Should smoking trigger an R rating? CNN.com July 11, 2012 Quoted: "This is a compelling study that adds to the existing research and leads us to one unequivocal conclusion, and that is that smoking in movies should result in an R rating," says Dr. Michael C. Fiore, director of the University of Wisconsin Center for Tobacco Research, in Madison. Fiore was not involved in the study.
  • Seely on Science: UW-Madison scientists front and center for historic Higgs boson discovery Wisconsin State Journal July 5, 2012 At a moment in science history that many are hailing as one of the most important in a century, UW-Madison researchers were front and center, playing lead roles in a discovery that takes modern physics to the very edge of human understanding. Scientists from UW-Madison were deeply involved in figuring out the physics and building and operating the $10 billion machine used to discover a particle believed to be the so-called “God particle,” responsible for giving matter mass and shaping the very early universe.
  • Heat Waves Hardest On Minority Communities, Experts Say Huffington Post July 9, 2012 Quoted: Steve Vavrus, a senior scientist in the Nelson Institute Center for Climatic Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, says that while more research needs to be done, unusual conditions -- including last winter’s ranking as the fourth-warmest in the U.S.; spring turning out to be the warmest since record-keeping began in 1895; and April marking the end of the warmest 12-month period in U.S. history -- are harbingers of what’s to come if greenhouse warming persists.
  • Wild parsnip gaining ground Waterloo Cedar-Falls Courier July 9, 2012 Quoted: "It is a dangerous plant for several reasons, and probably human health is at the top of the list," says Mark Renz, an authority on invasive plants at the University of Wisconsin.
  • Heat Wave Health Woes: Hot Temperatures And Excess Pollution Put Children At Risk Huffington Post July 5, 2012 Quoted: "Especially at high risk is an infant wrapped up in a blanket," who is unable to tend to himself or tell an adult how he feels, said Jonathan Patz, director of the Global Health Institute at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.
  • Fireworks: A field day for applied science Winston-Salem, N.C. Journal July 3, 2012 When you get all choked up watching Fourth of July fireworks, save a little of that ooh-ahh emotion for chemistry and other scientific disciplines. Bassam Z. Shakhashiri knows all about this: He’s a professor of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin and is the president of the American Chemical Society. Shakhashiri is also an entertainer by choice, giving lectures and programs around the world that help better connect people with the often obtuse world of science.
  • Crops, people wilt in intense heat across southern Wisconsin Isthmus July 3, 2012 Noted: Madison has not seen a June this dry since 1988, says Chris Kucharik, associate professor of agronomy and environmental studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. That year, he explains, "people would categorize as the last real catastrophic drought that happened in the Midwest, but it was much more widespread than what we’re seeing this year."
  • UW men's basketball: Taylor to play for Hawks' Summer League team Madison.com July 3, 2012 Jordan Taylor has made his NBA Summer League plans, and they do not include the Milwaukee Bucks. The former point guard for the University of Wisconsin men’s basketball team said Monday he has accepted an offer to play for the Atlanta Hawks’ entry in the Summer League, which begins later this month in Las Vegas.
  • 'We're all journalists now,' but at what cost? Vancouver Sun July 3, 2012 Quoted: Stephen Ward, former head of the University of B.C. journalism pro-gram, is trying to help us figure out an answer. He’s doing so for the sake of democracy, truth and maybe planetary survival.Much depends upon how we resolve the mind-boggling issues that people like Ward, a veteran war correspondent who is now director of the Center for Journalism Ethics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, are trying to wrestle into some semblance of coherence.
  • 100 years later, Camp Randall Civil War memorial stands tall Milwaukee Journal Sentinel June 28, 2012 They worried people would forget. It might seem odd now, even 150 years after the Civil War, that anyone would not remember the terrible fight to preserve the United States. But that fear of losing the collective memory spurred veterans - both Confederate and Union - to construct monuments and memorials.
  • Wooden structure is direct link to Camp Randall military history Milwaukee Journal Sentinel June 28, 2012 What’s the wooden structure next to the historical marker along Monroe St. near the Camp Randall Sports Facility? Daniel Einstein, University of Wisconsin historic and cultural resource manager, wondered, too. Since the adjacent marker mentions a stockade for Confederate prisoners of war, many passers-by assume that’s what the small wood building is.
  • Mohammed Ahmed wins 10,000 to earn ticket to London Games Calgary Herald June 28, 2012 Mohammed Ahmed buckled to his knees upon crossing the finish line of the men’s 10,000-metre final at the Canadian Olympic Track and Field Trials.
  • Athletes With Wisconsin Ties To Take Part In 2012 Olympic Summer Games NBC-15 June 25, 2012 Several athletes with Wisconsin ties will take part in the 2012 Olympic Summer Games in London.
  • Kids Can Be Costly Long After They Turn 18 Wall Street Journal June 25, 2012 Quoted: Lonnie Berger, associate professor of social work at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, says post-18 expenditures matter in adding up all costs to parents. Given the prolonged dependency of many adult children in the current economy, "ideally, such an accounting would extend at least through the early to mid 30s," Prof. Berger says.
  • Katherine Cramer Walsh: Listen to the legitimacy of other voters Madison.com June 25, 2012 Two-and-a-half weeks past the recall election and many Wisconsinites are doing their best to move on. They’ve taken down their yard signs, and even peeled off their bumper stickers.
  • Still: Wisconsin can play a role in 'reinventing' the Internet Wisconsin Technology Council June 21, 2012 By any standard, the Internet ranks as one of the leading innovations of our time. It has revolutionized everything from commerce to medicine to entertainment, all within the confines of a generation.
  • UW study responsible for much of what scientists now know about sleep Wisconsin State Journal June 20, 2012 Sleep apnea — repeated pauses in breathing during sleep — is much more common than previously thought. The condition increases the risk of high blood pressure, depression, heart disease, cancer and death. Losing weight and exercising can offset it. People who sleep too little or too much, regardless of whether they have sleep apnea, are more likely to be overweight. Those and other findings about sleep are common knowledge among scientists today thanks to Don Chisholm, Mary Ellen Havel-Lang, Paul Minkus and more than 1,540 other participants in the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study.
  • Euro 2012: England v Ukraine - The science of home advantage BBC Sport June 19, 2012 Noted: Matthew Fuxjager and his colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison let male mice chalk up three rigged "wins" against other mice and then after a fourth win, studied how many "androgen receptors" there were in key parts of their brains. Androgen receptors are receiving stations for testosterone, and the more there are of them, the more powerfully any single spurt of testosterone will affect the brain.
  • A Laboratory for All R&D Mag June 18, 2012 By sticking to one big "Idea", project leaders for the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery were able to make a number of new laboratory design concepts work.
  • UW doctor helping build hospital in Ecuador Milwaukee Journal Sentinel June 15, 2012 Nearly 17 years after the birth of Andean Health and Development, the organization is expanding to train Ecuadorean physicians and work toward opening a hospital in Santo Domingo, Ecuador, just west of the capital, Quito. The Milwaukee native behind the nonprofit organization, physician David Gaus, along with the Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, started a hospital in 2000 in Pedro Vicente Maldonado, a small rural district in the Pichincha province.
  • UW PEOPLE Program going strong The Madison Times June 15, 2012 It’s hard to believe, but the University of Wisconsin-Madison Pre-college Enrichment Opportunity Program for Learning Excellence  (PEOPLE) program is already 13 years old.
  • UW agriculture expert on current dry spell: 'Let's hope it rains' WTMJ-TV Milwaukee June 15, 2012 MADISON - An agriculture professor in the University of Wisconsin says that farmers are experiencing some level of anxiety over the lack of rain so far this spring and summer.
  • Lance Armstrong case: Can doping be permitted in sport? BBC News Online June 15, 2012 Quoted: "They’re virtually all unnatural means to enhance performance," says Norman Fost, professor of paediatrics, medical history and bioethics at the University of Wisconsin.
  • Equality and the End of Marrying Up New York Times June 13, 2012 Noted: So while husbands and wives have become more equal, inequality between families appears to be on the rise. As Christine R. Schwartz, a professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin, puts it: “Marriages are increasingly likely to consist of two high- or two low-earning partners,” rather than of one of each.
  • Hudson's Drewiske hoists Stanley Cup RiverTowns.net June 13, 2012 Hudson High School graduate Davis Drewiske, who won a state high school hockey championship with the Raiders in 2001, played on the University of Wisconsin’s 2006 national championship team, realized the dream of hockey players everywhere Monday night when he hoisted the Stanley Cup after his Los Angeles Kings team defeated the New Jersey Devils, 6-1, to win the franchise’s first National Hockey League title.
  • Some top colleges offer free online classes; what does that mean for UW? Capital Times June 7, 2012 Aaron Brower is typical of many academics in that he generally takes a well-reasoned, measured approach when addressing various topics with reporters. So the choice of words from UW-Madison’s vice provost for teaching and learning was telling when he was asked to comment on a rash of recent media accounts pointing to a potential seminal shift in how higher education is delivered to students.
  • UW researchers hope to see into eye of hurricane — from afar Wisconsin State Journal June 5, 2012 In a 15-story building, in the middle of land-locked Wisconsin, a team of scientists waits for hurricane season. That’s when a multi-million dollar, unmanned aircraft will start flying from Wallops Island, Va., loaded up with a UW-Madison-engineered instrument to gather data from tropical storms off the Atlantic coast. "It's sort of a mystery right now in our science community as to why hurricanes intensify or de-intensify," said Chris Velden, a UW-Madison scientist working on the project. "We hope to get some information from this aircraft to be able to answer those questions."
  • America's Brainiest Cities The Atlantic June 6, 2012 In a knowledge economy, we are often told the smartest cities and nations do the best. But economists typically measure smart cities by education level, calculating the cities or metros with the largest percentage of college grads or the largest shares of adults with advanced degrees. Others (like me) do it by charting the kinds of work people do and the occupations they hold, differentiating between knowledge or creative workers and others who do more routine manufacturing and service jobs.