UW-Madison in the Media

A selection of media coverage about the university and its people.

  • Der Stiftskeller murals to be reconstructed after Memorial Union renovation Isthmus Aug. 30, 2012 UW-Madison officials know how attached students and alumni are to anything related to Der Rathskeller and Der Stiftskeller -- the murals, the German beer steins and the wooden tables, inlaid with decades of carved graffiti.
  • U.S. cases of West Nile virus set record, deaths rise: CDC Reuters Aug. 30, 2012 Quoted: "Higher temperatures foster faster reproduction of both the mosquito and the virus," said Tony Goldberg, professor of epidemiology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, who has studied urban outbreaks of West Nile since shortly after the virus arrived in the Midwest.
  • Ice Age Melt Offers Future Climate Clues Voice of America Aug. 30, 2012 When the climate began to warm during the last Ice Age about 23,000 years ago, much of the Northern Hemisphere was covered in ice. University of Wisconsin geologist Anders Carlson studies ice sheet melt from land and ocean sediment cores.  His study describes what prehistoric Earth was like in North America and Northern Europe some 140,000 years ago.  
  • Board of Regents Okay UW-Madison Dairy Facility Upgrades Wisconsin Ag Connection Aug. 27, 2012 A proposed $75-million remodeling project for the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Babcock Hall has receiving the blessing of the UW Board of Regents. Last week, the panel gave its approval to a plan that would provide half of the funding for remodeling and expanding the dairy research and teaching space and ice-cream and cheese-making facilities in Babcock Hall. The project also includes building a new livestock and poultry products laboratory.
  • Sensors for Brain Injuries May Help Future Athletes New York Times Aug. 27, 2012 Noted: At the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Thad G. Walker, an atomic physicist, uses optical magnetometry to monitor the magnetic fields of the beating heart rather than the brain. Professor Walker and his group have created small magnetometers that are an inexpensive alternative to superconducting devices now used to spot various heart abnormalities in a fetus.
  • How Long Do You Want to Live? New York Times Aug. 27, 2012 But another stem cell pioneer, James Thomson of the University of Wisconsin, believes that stem cell solutions will be a long time coming for more complex organs. “We’re a long way from transplanting cells into a human brain or nervous system,” he said.
  • Arms and the Duck New York Times Aug. 27, 2012 Quoted: “You don’t mess with hunting and fishing because that’s part of who we are,” says Kathy Cramer Walsh, a professor at the University of Wisconsin who specializes in civic engagement. “A lot of times, talk about regulating guns and ammunition is seen as the outside trying to change who we are.”
  • We dare you to take a real vacation CNN.com Aug. 21, 2012 Quoted: "A lot of people are really busy because they take a little dose of family and then they want to back off," says Joanne Cantor, a communications professor emeritus at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. "You can see parents with teenagers and see teens going for their gadgets all the time. It’s a good thing, but not necessarily the easiest thing to devote more time to your family."
  • UW Lifesaving Station quietly rescues boaters and swimmers Isthmus Aug. 20, 2012 Nestled on the southeast shores of Lake Mendota next to James Madison Park is the UW Lifesaving Station — a concrete structure resembling a fortress.
  • Using Twitter to Crack Down on Bullying Time.com Aug. 17, 2012 It’s hard to prevent bullying if you don’t know it’s happening. That’s why researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a program that they say is capable of detecting evidence of bullying from among the hundreds of millions of tweets sent each day.
  • Biker returns home after 1,700-mile trek Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune Aug. 17, 2012 After traveling 1,700 miles, dealing with 14 flat tires, getting chased by more than 100 dogs, and developing some prominent tan lines, Matt Stoltz was happy to be home in Wisconsin Rapids this week from his bike trek to West Palm Beach, Fla.
  • Agricultural research celebrates 100 years in Marshfield The Marshfield News-Herald Aug. 17, 2012 The University of Wisconsin Marshfield Agricultural Research Station celebrated its 100th anniversary Thursday with an all-day open house along with a re-dedication program that featured speakers from all levels of government.
  • Kids' abilities to delay gratification may keep them thin later in life FOX News Aug. 16, 2012 The ability to delay gratification as a child may lower a person’s chances of being overweight later in life, according to new research.
  • Yoga, deep breathing used to address soldiers' post-traumatic stress Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Aug. 16, 2012 Rich Low dreamed of Iraq long after he returned home from the war. The memories haunted him when he was awake, too. About six months after his deployment, he was driving at night when a sudden burst of lightning snapped him back to Baghdad and the bomb that exploded near him during a thunderstorm. Low’s pulse raced as adrenaline surged through his body even though he was driving on a road far from any war zone.He didn’t know post-traumatic stress was affecting him. Not until he took part in a University of Wisconsin-Madison study that taught Iraq and Afghanistan veterans yoga, meditation and breathing techniques to cope with PTSD.
  • On Campus: UW grad student's 'Feminist Ryan Gosling' blog hits the big time Wisconsin State Journal Aug. 14, 2012 Be careful what you blog about — it might make you famous. That’s the lesson learned by UW-Madison graduate student Danielle Henderson. When she started a blog with photos of hunky movie star Ryan Gosling mouthing cheeky, made-up feminist thoughts, she intended it as a study guide for herself and a source of laughs for a few like-minded friends. She’s about to start her second year in a master’s program in gender and women’s studies. Now, after attracting more than 20,000 followers, the blog feministryangosling.tumblr.com is being published in a book, "Feminist Ryan Gosling," coming out on Tuesday.
  • Allergy season starts early, but it could be a mild one LaCrosse Tribune Aug. 15, 2012 The season began early because of the mild winter and unseasonably warm spring weather, causing trees to bud and bloom and release pollen and mold much earlier, said Dr. Mark Moss at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health.
  • UW-Madison community holds vigil to honor shooting victims Daily Cardinal Aug. 9, 2012 Members of the University of Wisconsin-Madison community gathered in Library Mall for a candlelight vigil Wednesday to memorialize the victims of the recent Sikh temple shooting.
  • A Journey through the Human Brain with Giulio Tononi Public Radio International Aug. 7, 2012 The human brain and our consciousness: they have been mystical and exotic topics that many a scientist has tried again and again to understand. Neuroscientist Guilio Tononi, a psychiatrist at the University of Wisconsin, is one of those scientists.
  • National Guard troops get crash course in ag The Country Today Aug. 1, 2012 MADISON — Captain Craig Giese of the Wisconsin Army National Guard grew up in an agricultural family — his parents were both raised on Shawano County dairy farms — but when he was assigned as the officer in charge of a 12-member Agribusiness Development Team that will deploy to Afghanistan early next year, he knew he needed some more agricultural knowledge.
  • Milwaukee triathlete ready for Olympic test Milwaukee Journal Sentinel July 31, 2012 A couple of years ago, Gwen Jorgensen of Milwaukee was a triathlon newbie, just getting her feet wet, figuratively and literally, in a brand new sport.
  • Drought: How the Heat Intensifies Fruit and Vegetable Flavors Time.com July 31, 2012 Noted: Farmers say they’re growing some of the most flavorful produce in years. Part of the reason is the lack of rain: the more water content in produce like cucumbers, tomatoes, melons, peaches and grapes, the plumper and juicier they are. But the water also dilutes their flavor. Smaller, less juicy fruits and veggies this season are packing a more concentrated tastiness. “Most plants that have high moisture content will now have sharper flavors, like peppers and tomatoes,” says Irwin Goldman, a horticulture professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where farmers have been feeling the heat. “Whenever there is a drought, flavor compounds can become more dominant and foods can have more pungency.”
  • Evan Jager took to the steeplechase in short time Charlotte Observer July 30, 2012 LONDON - It’s not unusual for a track athlete to win a car for an exceptional performance. But at 13? That’s how old Evan Jager was when he took possession of a 1989 5.0-liter Ford Mustang, which instantly made him the most popular kid in his eighth-grade class in Algonquin, Ill.
  • 6-Year-Old Skips Presents, Instead Donates to K9 Unit NBC-15 July 30, 2012 A 6-year-old with a big heart forgoes all of her birthday presents. Katelyn instead asked for donations and is now handing them over to the UW-Madison Police Department K9 team.
  • Historic Wisconsin Union Theater materials are unearthed Isthmus July 27, 2012 Hidden treasure was recently discovered at the Wisconsin Union Theater: a massive collection of documents and conceptual artwork dating back to the venue’s earliest stages.
  • Editorial: Root for important research Wisconsin State Journal July 25, 2012 It’s exciting to see stem cell pioneer James Thomson attracting millions of more dollars to Wisconsin for exciting research. Yes, the famed scientist and so many of his talented colleagues in the public and private sectors still call Madison their home — something we should all be proud of and thankful for. Thomson’s lab just landed a $2.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to help speed the discovery of drugs and improve their safety for humans. The State Journal reported in April that Madison's stem cell enterprise may not be as big as those in Boston, San Diego, San Francisco and other big cities on the coasts. Yet Madison likely has more people per capita working in the field — and a drive to stay on top. Let's root for this important sector of our economy that's increasingly important in saving, improving and extending lives.
  • Madison tops 'best cities for young adults' list Milwaukee Journal Sentinel July 25, 2012 If you’re in your 20s, you can dismiss thoughts of moving to Austin, Texas, or Washington. Madison is where you want to be.
  • Olympics fever rises in Madison as 10 athletes with area ties prepare to compete in London Madison.com July 23, 2012 It makes sense that Suzy Favor Hamilton would carve some time out of her busy schedule every four years to relax on her couch and watch some of the track and field competition at the Summer Olympics.
  • Bob Lavigna: Redesign of UW human resources system is opportunity all should welcome Capital Times July 23, 2012 The University of Wisconsin-Madison has been given an unprecedented opportunity to develop a human resources system specifically tailored to the unique needs of a world-class university.
  • Drought expected to drive up cost of milk, cheese USA Today July 19, 2012 Noted: The rises foreshadow expected price hikes in coming months for other food staples, such as meat, says Bruce Jones, a professor of agricultural economy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dairy is affected quickly because cows immediately make less milk.
  • Jeremy Lin Leaves the Knicks: Some Asian-American Fans Feel Betrayed Wall Street Journal July 19, 2012 Quoted: “I don’t care who he plays for — I’m a Lin fan, not a Knicks fan,” says Timothy Yu, an associate professor of Asian American Studies (and Jeremy Lin Studies pioneer) at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. “What I’m mad about is that the Knicks just completely cut him loose — and they’re blaming him for cutting such a hard-nosed deal with the Rockets. The fact of the matter is that even the team that benefited from Linsanity doesn’t believe it’s for real. That really burns me as an Asian American fan. But shed no tears for Jeremy: An Asian American athlete is getting paid like a superstar, because he is one — and that’s cool.”