UW-Madison in the Media

A selection of media coverage about the university and its people.

  • Still: Wisconsin can play a role in 'reinventing' the Internet Wisconsin Technology Council June 21, 2012 By any standard, the Internet ranks as one of the leading innovations of our time. It has revolutionized everything from commerce to medicine to entertainment, all within the confines of a generation.
  • UW study responsible for much of what scientists now know about sleep Wisconsin State Journal June 20, 2012 Sleep apnea — repeated pauses in breathing during sleep — is much more common than previously thought. The condition increases the risk of high blood pressure, depression, heart disease, cancer and death. Losing weight and exercising can offset it. People who sleep too little or too much, regardless of whether they have sleep apnea, are more likely to be overweight. Those and other findings about sleep are common knowledge among scientists today thanks to Don Chisholm, Mary Ellen Havel-Lang, Paul Minkus and more than 1,540 other participants in the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study.
  • Euro 2012: England v Ukraine - The science of home advantage BBC Sport June 19, 2012 Noted: Matthew Fuxjager and his colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison let male mice chalk up three rigged "wins" against other mice and then after a fourth win, studied how many "androgen receptors" there were in key parts of their brains. Androgen receptors are receiving stations for testosterone, and the more there are of them, the more powerfully any single spurt of testosterone will affect the brain.
  • A Laboratory for All R&D Mag June 18, 2012 By sticking to one big "Idea", project leaders for the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery were able to make a number of new laboratory design concepts work.
  • UW doctor helping build hospital in Ecuador Milwaukee Journal Sentinel June 15, 2012 Nearly 17 years after the birth of Andean Health and Development, the organization is expanding to train Ecuadorean physicians and work toward opening a hospital in Santo Domingo, Ecuador, just west of the capital, Quito. The Milwaukee native behind the nonprofit organization, physician David Gaus, along with the Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, started a hospital in 2000 in Pedro Vicente Maldonado, a small rural district in the Pichincha province.
  • UW PEOPLE Program going strong The Madison Times June 15, 2012 It’s hard to believe, but the University of Wisconsin-Madison Pre-college Enrichment Opportunity Program for Learning Excellence  (PEOPLE) program is already 13 years old.
  • UW agriculture expert on current dry spell: 'Let's hope it rains' WTMJ-TV Milwaukee June 15, 2012 MADISON - An agriculture professor in the University of Wisconsin says that farmers are experiencing some level of anxiety over the lack of rain so far this spring and summer.
  • Lance Armstrong case: Can doping be permitted in sport? BBC News Online June 15, 2012 Quoted: "They’re virtually all unnatural means to enhance performance," says Norman Fost, professor of paediatrics, medical history and bioethics at the University of Wisconsin.
  • Equality and the End of Marrying Up New York Times June 13, 2012 Noted: So while husbands and wives have become more equal, inequality between families appears to be on the rise. As Christine R. Schwartz, a professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin, puts it: “Marriages are increasingly likely to consist of two high- or two low-earning partners,” rather than of one of each.
  • Hudson's Drewiske hoists Stanley Cup RiverTowns.net June 13, 2012 Hudson High School graduate Davis Drewiske, who won a state high school hockey championship with the Raiders in 2001, played on the University of Wisconsin’s 2006 national championship team, realized the dream of hockey players everywhere Monday night when he hoisted the Stanley Cup after his Los Angeles Kings team defeated the New Jersey Devils, 6-1, to win the franchise’s first National Hockey League title.
  • Some top colleges offer free online classes; what does that mean for UW? Capital Times June 7, 2012 Aaron Brower is typical of many academics in that he generally takes a well-reasoned, measured approach when addressing various topics with reporters. So the choice of words from UW-Madison’s vice provost for teaching and learning was telling when he was asked to comment on a rash of recent media accounts pointing to a potential seminal shift in how higher education is delivered to students.
  • UW researchers hope to see into eye of hurricane — from afar Wisconsin State Journal June 5, 2012 In a 15-story building, in the middle of land-locked Wisconsin, a team of scientists waits for hurricane season. That’s when a multi-million dollar, unmanned aircraft will start flying from Wallops Island, Va., loaded up with a UW-Madison-engineered instrument to gather data from tropical storms off the Atlantic coast. "It's sort of a mystery right now in our science community as to why hurricanes intensify or de-intensify," said Chris Velden, a UW-Madison scientist working on the project. "We hope to get some information from this aircraft to be able to answer those questions."
  • America's Brainiest Cities The Atlantic June 6, 2012 In a knowledge economy, we are often told the smartest cities and nations do the best. But economists typically measure smart cities by education level, calculating the cities or metros with the largest percentage of college grads or the largest shares of adults with advanced degrees. Others (like me) do it by charting the kinds of work people do and the occupations they hold, differentiating between knowledge or creative workers and others who do more routine manufacturing and service jobs.
  • The Secrets of the Healthy Mind The Atlantic May 31, 2012 Nearly 20 years ago, the Dalai Lama asked a biologist why the tools of neuroscience couldn’t be used to investigate kindness, compassion and well being. The answer is that neurobiologists rarely choose to investigate these areas. Even though, then as now, they had tools capable of probing the connections. Most everyday experiences change the brain, often for the better. And it’s impossible to learn any new information without changes occurring in the brain. The Dalai Lama’s question made a deep impression on neuroscientist Richard Davidson, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, who went on to found the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds in 2008. He’s also co-author of a recently published review article detailing the progress investigators worldwide have made in understanding the factors that help and harm the mind’s development.
  • Rites of passage for college-bound kids Chicago Tribune May 31, 2012 Noted: On a more practical level, Patti Lux-Weber, the Parent Program coordinator at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, says that there are some basic topics that parents may want to cover before sending their offspring into an environment where they’ll have significantly more freedom than they had at home.
  • Mind-reading robotic teachers are more... Anyone? Anyone? Attention-grabbing Engadget May 30, 2012 You’d have thought that replacing a human teacher with a swanky robot would be enough to keep the kids interested, but apparently not. The University of Wisconsin-Madison found that supplying a robot teacher didn’t in itself max out concentration.
  • Planned Wolf Hunting Stirs Passions in Midwest Wall Street Journal May 30, 2012 Noted: Some scientists and defenders of the wolves say the Wisconsin rules are too lenient for hunters—and too cruel for the wolves. At up to 4½ months, "the season is too long; it covers too wide of an area and it comes with too many untested methods," including using dogs and allowing night hunts, said Adrian Treves, an associate professor of environmental studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who studies predator-prey ecology.
  • UW Marching Band stalwart 'Badger Bill' Garvey succumbs to cancer Wisconsin State Journal May 25, 2012 "Badger Bill" Garvey was an icon in both McFarland where he taught music for 31 years and among the UW-Madison community who shared his passion for all things Wisconsin.
  • Does your brain 'dismantle' itself during sleep? Daily Mail (UK) May 25, 2012 Without sleep, humans become irritable, inefficient and accident prone - but HOW sleep heals us still isn’t fully understood.
  • Column: University of Wisconsin-Madison has strong ties to rest of state Appleton Post-Crescent May 23, 2012 I read with interest the recent Post-Crescent editorial declaring that the University of Wisconsin-Madison needed to make a better connection with state residents.
  • Five colleges where students study Washington Post May 22, 2012 A story in today’s Post talks about a generational decline in study time, the number of weekly hours college students devote to actual study. Since the 1960s, the weekly total has dipped from 24 to about 15. College has become, in effect, a part-time job.
  • Kohler native Sachse, father of UW's 'Bucky,' dies at 85 Sheboygan Press May 22, 2012 During more than 60 years of existence, Bucky Badger has put smiles on the faces of thousands of University of Wisconsin-Madison fans at athletic contests, hospitals, parades, weddings and many other types of events.
  • Give a lift to UW volunteers Wisconsin State Journal May 21, 2012 Hey, can you give a well-intentioned college kid a ride? Or, more to the point, can you help pay for the ride that kid needs to do much-needed volunteer work in our community? It’s well documented that volunteerism is one of the important civic threads that bind our community together. What isn’t so well known is that an important piece of that volunteer corps resides on the UW-Madison campus. And many hundreds of those college student volunteers could use a lift. Literally.
  • Citizen Dave: My speech to UW Urban and Regional Planning graduates Isthmus May 21, 2012 A few years ago I was invited to give a commencement speech for Edgewood College graduates. I wasnt invited back. In fact, I was never again asked to give a commencement speech anywhere. I guess word got around.But on Saturday night, I did give a "keynote address" to the graduates of the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at UW-Madison. Not officially a "commencement speech" and I didnt get to wear a robe or anything, but still close enough. So, I adapted my Edgewood address for that audience.
  • Head 'em up, move 'em out: Thousands of UW students moving out of dorms this week Capital Times May 16, 2012 Spring is here! The birds are chirping, the grass is growing, car horns are blaring and tempers are rising all over the UW-Madison campus. Why? It’s move-out time. This annual rite of spring is like a campus tsunami, with 7,000 students juggling finals and moving boxes at the same time. Add in thousands of family members and friends heading to commencements Friday through Sunday at the Kohl Center, across Dayton Street from the southeast campus complex of dorms, and you can understand why this should be called May Madness.
  • Seahawks' Russell Wilson says 'height's not a factor' NFL.com May 17, 2012 In most rooms, Russell Wilson blends in just fine. At 5-foot-11, he’s by no means a shrimp, but in the buildup to the NFL draft, Wilson’s "height issue" dominated scouting reports. His promising 72.8 completion percentage as a senior at Wisconsin was alluring, but quarterbacks under six feet aren’t usually long for the NFL.
  • MTV Movie Awards: More In Touch Than The Oscars? International Business Times May 17, 2012 Noted: "By that measure, the most popular movies have already won a very big award in the form of lots of cash," Jonathan Gray, a professor of media and cultural studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, wrote in an email. "While it may seem elitist and snobbish for other award ceremonies to ’ignore’ popularity, I often find myself wondering why something that got half a billion dollars at the box office needs a little faux-gold statuette for validation."  
  • Reading Pushkin in Brussels New York Times May 14, 2012 Noted: A leading U.S. Pushkinist, David Bethea of the University of Wisconsin, agrees that translations of Pushkin into other languages can be disastrous. Most renderings into English come out like “a pretty good Victorian poet, maybe Tennyson,” he told me by telephone.
  • Could Helium-3 really solve Earth's energy problems? io9 May 14, 2012 Noted: The Helium-3 fusion process is not simply theoretical — the University of Wisconsin-Madison Fusion Technology Institute successfully performed fusion experiments combining two molecules of Helium-3. Estimates place the efficiency of Helium-3 fusion reactions at seventy percent, out-pacing coal and natural gas electricity generation by twenty percent.
  • How Maurice Sendak’s ‘Wild Things’ moved children’s books toward realism Christian Science Monitor May 11, 2012 Quoted: "With Maurice Sendak’s 1963 classic tale of vengeful rebellion, Max and the Wild Things ushered in a new era in children’s literature,” says Kathleen Horning, director of the Cooperative Children’s Book Center at the University of Wisconsin School of Education in Madison.