UW-Madison in the Media

A selection of media coverage about the university and its people.

  • A new UW-Madison center helps veterans access funding and adjust to campus life Isthmus June 27, 2014 College students with military ties face numerous challenges. They must make the adjustment from active duty to campus life and try to navigate all the complexities of an updated GI Bill, which provides benefits to eligible veterans like assistance with tuition and living expenses. But now student veterans at UW-Madison have a new ally in the Veteran Services and Military Assistance Center, which opened May 15.
  • UW student leaders engage with communities statewide Madison Commons June 27, 2014 The week after finals, a group of incoming student leaders at the University of Wisconsin-Madison travelled the state by bus to learn more about connecting both to each other and Wisconsin’s communities.
  • On Campus: Electric cars coming to UW-Madison Madison.com June 24, 2014 Four mini-cars will be tooling around UW-Madison for the next year, fueled by electricity and available for short-term checkout by anyone with a university ID, including faculty, staff and students. The university is one of four campuses nationally and the only one in the Midwest to host the cars.
  • Richard Davis: The face of the bass Isthmus June 20, 2014 There are a handful of moments on saxophonist Eric Dolphy’s seminal free jazz album Out to Lunch where the bassist lays down a series of upward-inflected glissandi, as if a question is being asked. He then answers with a descending line. Eventually the rest of the band come back in, providing the ultimate response to the query issued by the bass. The effect is downright Socratic; it’s almost as if the bassist is a music philosopher employing the classic Q&A format to encourage his pupil, the listener, to examine a particular musical problem from a particular angle.
  • Tom Still: UW-Madison professor's project draws fire in Internet age Milwaukee Journal Sentinel June 16, 2014 The engineering of a flu virus similar to one that killed 40 million people in 1918 has some scientists sharply criticizing the work of University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher Yoshihiro Kawaoka, who generated a virus that differed from its pandemic ancestor by only 3% of the amino acids that make up virus proteins.
  • Blind pianist creates 3D musical score CCTV News June 13, 2014 As part of her doctoral dissertation at the University of Wisconsin, a pianist named Yeaji Kim has come up with a complete 3D musical score that can be used by blind students.
  • Picture perfect: More people hiring professional photographers to document everyday life AP June 10, 2014 But is it possible to present a realistic view of ordinary experiences if a photographer is staging and enhancing each shot? Catalina Toma, a University of Wisconsin-Madison professor whose research includes examining emotional well-being and social media, says people tend to construct very flattering images of themselves online.
  • Power of Repetition: Jim Dine Skulls Pack the Chazen Madison Magazine June 9, 2014 Perhaps the best—and nearly unavoidable—way to start an exploration of the new Jim Dine artwork at the Chazen Museum of Art is with the six-foot-tall sculpture of a human skull sitting outside the front doors. Roughly textured, with dark eye hollows, the bronze form serves as a fitting harbinger for the sixty-six prints, paintings, drawings, photographs and sculptures of skulls that await inside the museum.
  • Five Free Things in Madison, From Campus to Capitol AP June 6, 2014 Nestled on an isthmus that’s home to both buttoned-up politicians in the state Capitol and more liberal-leaning college students just a short walk away, Madison lives up to its endearing unofficial motto as ‘‘77 square miles surrounded by reality.’’
  • @UWMadison second most influential university on Twitter, study finds Madison.com June 6, 2014 UW-Madison rocks Twitter, a new study found.
  • UW research examines dating, prescription drug mix WKOW TV June 6, 2014 With bold, newspaper ads topped by the question, "Are you DATING?," UW-Madison researchers are recruiting study subjects to delve into the daily lives of young couples, and the potential impact of prescription drug use, and misuse, on their happiness.
  • UW-Madison overhauls recruitment and staff management systems Employee Benefit News June 2, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison is bringing its personnel management system into the 21st century to remain competitive and efficient – a tactic that HR consultants say is being replicated by other higher learning institutions across the nation.
  • Business School, Disrupted New York Times June 2, 2014 Noted: François Ortalo-Magné, dean of the University of Wisconsin’s business school, says fissures have already appeared. Recently, a rival school offered one of his faculty members not just a job, but also shares in an online learning start-up created especially for him. “We’re talking about millions of dollars,” Mr. Ortalo-Magné said. “My best teachers are going to find platforms so they can teach to the world for free. The market is finding a way to unbundle us. My job is to hold this platform together.”
  • Moynihan: The problem at the VA: 'Performance perversity' Los Angeles Times June 2, 2014 The acting inspector general’s investigation into delays at Veterans Health Administration facilities points to problems so systemic that they cannot be attributed to a few bad apples. But the report does not tell us why these problems occurred.
  • Ellenberg: The Wrong Way to Treat Child Geniuses Wall Street Journal June 2, 2014 When I was a child, I was a "genius"—the kind you sometimes see profiled on the local news. I started reading at 2. I could multiply two-digit numbers in my head when I was 5. One of my earliest memories is working out a way to generate Pythagorean triples. In third grade, I commuted to the local junior high to take geometry. Kids on the playground would sometimes test me by asking what a million times a million was—and were delighted when I knew the answer.
  • Evjue Foundation distributes $1.1 million to UW and area nonprofits Capital Times May 28, 2014 Checks totaling nearly $1.1 million have been sent to 83 area nonprofits and to 25 project managers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison by The Evjue Foundation, the charitable arm of The Capital Times.
  • Group applauds UW medical schools for focus on primary care Wisconsin Public Radio May 27, 2014 The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) says the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health is doing a good job graduating primary care physicians at time when the role is in high demand.
  • Weighing the debate over Net Neutrality Wisconsin Radio Network May 27, 2014 Federal communications officials are considering proposed rules that are aimed at the ongoing debate over net neutrality. Supporters argue they will give businesses a chance to make sure their products get to consumers quickly, but critics argue they would create an internet fast lane that shuts out companies who can’t afford to pay.
  • Winichakul: Thailand on the brink of civil war Al Jazeera America May 23, 2014 Thailand’s Senate, the country’s only functioning legislative chamber, convened an informal meeting last week to deliberate on ways to end that country’s six-month-old political stalemate.
  • On Campus: UW-Madison veterans get own space Wisconsin State Journal May 20, 2014 Students who are military veterans using the federal GI Bill have more than quadrupled in enrollment at UW-Madison since 2005.
  • Jump around and take a selfie: #UWGrad drives UW-Madison commencement on social media Capital Times May 19, 2014 The strong social media community on the UW campus is exhibited in full force in the weeks leading up to graduation — and this year, for the first time, it will play a part in the atmosphere of the day itself.
  • Autism is growing up CNN.com May 21, 2014 Noted: In her conference keynote address, Marsha Mailick, director of the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, shared data gleaned from 10 years of following the lives of more than 400 people with autism, starting in 1998. This study was prescient; adults are vastly underrepresented in autism research, and longitudinal studies into old age are badly needed.
  • Hiring expected to increase for college graduates WISC-TV 3 May 16, 2014 Commencement calls for celebration, but it can have young adults asking what’s next?
  • UW-Madison scholars offer a map to the net neutrality debate Isthmus May 16, 2014 Maybe you’ve spotted it in your daily news feed in the last few weeks. Net neutrality -- the idea that the Internet should remain an open, democratic, free-market medium for all people, regardless of how much they pay -- is getting mainstream attention.
  • Hurricanes reaching peak strength farther north as globe warms, tropics expand Washington Post May 14, 2014 As the Earth’s oceans have warmed over the last three decades, the grounds for destructive hurricanes have crept northward finds a new study, published by three of the world’s leading tropical weather experts. Two are from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • UW's 'accidental professor' seeks scientific insight through cartoons Milwaukee Journal Sentinel May 8, 2014 John Brennan was deeply engrossed in organic chemistry, studying for an exam last week, when he absent-mindedly began drawing goofy cartoon fish with conversation bubbles explaining mechanisms behind chemical reactions.
  • UW Athletics joins "You Can Play" project supporting athletes of all sexual orientations WKOW-TV 27 May 8, 2014 The University of Wisconsin has joined "You Can Play", a project dedicated to ensuring equality, respect and safety for all athletes, without regard to sexual orientation.
  • Poverty drops, but not to pre-recession levels, study finds Milwaukee Journal Sentinel May 8, 2014 The poverty level continued to drop in Wisconsin in 2012, thanks to increases in jobs and earnings, according to a new study released by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers.
  • Odyssey Project sets returning students on a path to a new future Capital Times May 7, 2014 Michael Martin says he is a different person than he was in September when he walked into the Odyssey Project. He’s more self-aware, more at peace with himself and the world.
  • Sociologist chronicles tenuous lives of fugitives Philadelphia Inquirer May 5, 2014 For a sociologist, the value of field notes can’t be overstated. Yet Alice Goffman felt deep relief at destroying hers - shredding the notebooks, then disposing of the hard drive kept in a safe-deposit box under someone else’s name.