UW-Madison in the Media

A selection of media coverage about the university and its people.

  • Allergy season starts early, but it could be a mild one LaCrosse Tribune Aug. 15, 2012 The season began early because of the mild winter and unseasonably warm spring weather, causing trees to bud and bloom and release pollen and mold much earlier, said Dr. Mark Moss at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health.
  • UW-Madison community holds vigil to honor shooting victims Daily Cardinal Aug. 9, 2012 Members of the University of Wisconsin-Madison community gathered in Library Mall for a candlelight vigil Wednesday to memorialize the victims of the recent Sikh temple shooting.
  • A Journey through the Human Brain with Giulio Tononi Public Radio International Aug. 7, 2012 The human brain and our consciousness: they have been mystical and exotic topics that many a scientist has tried again and again to understand. Neuroscientist Guilio Tononi, a psychiatrist at the University of Wisconsin, is one of those scientists.
  • National Guard troops get crash course in ag The Country Today Aug. 1, 2012 MADISON — Captain Craig Giese of the Wisconsin Army National Guard grew up in an agricultural family — his parents were both raised on Shawano County dairy farms — but when he was assigned as the officer in charge of a 12-member Agribusiness Development Team that will deploy to Afghanistan early next year, he knew he needed some more agricultural knowledge.
  • Milwaukee triathlete ready for Olympic test Milwaukee Journal Sentinel July 31, 2012 A couple of years ago, Gwen Jorgensen of Milwaukee was a triathlon newbie, just getting her feet wet, figuratively and literally, in a brand new sport.
  • Drought: How the Heat Intensifies Fruit and Vegetable Flavors Time.com July 31, 2012 Noted: Farmers say they’re growing some of the most flavorful produce in years. Part of the reason is the lack of rain: the more water content in produce like cucumbers, tomatoes, melons, peaches and grapes, the plumper and juicier they are. But the water also dilutes their flavor. Smaller, less juicy fruits and veggies this season are packing a more concentrated tastiness. “Most plants that have high moisture content will now have sharper flavors, like peppers and tomatoes,” says Irwin Goldman, a horticulture professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where farmers have been feeling the heat. “Whenever there is a drought, flavor compounds can become more dominant and foods can have more pungency.”
  • Evan Jager took to the steeplechase in short time Charlotte Observer July 30, 2012 LONDON - It’s not unusual for a track athlete to win a car for an exceptional performance. But at 13? That’s how old Evan Jager was when he took possession of a 1989 5.0-liter Ford Mustang, which instantly made him the most popular kid in his eighth-grade class in Algonquin, Ill.
  • 6-Year-Old Skips Presents, Instead Donates to K9 Unit NBC-15 July 30, 2012 A 6-year-old with a big heart forgoes all of her birthday presents. Katelyn instead asked for donations and is now handing them over to the UW-Madison Police Department K9 team.
  • Historic Wisconsin Union Theater materials are unearthed Isthmus July 27, 2012 Hidden treasure was recently discovered at the Wisconsin Union Theater: a massive collection of documents and conceptual artwork dating back to the venue’s earliest stages.
  • Editorial: Root for important research Wisconsin State Journal July 25, 2012 It’s exciting to see stem cell pioneer James Thomson attracting millions of more dollars to Wisconsin for exciting research. Yes, the famed scientist and so many of his talented colleagues in the public and private sectors still call Madison their home — something we should all be proud of and thankful for. Thomson’s lab just landed a $2.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to help speed the discovery of drugs and improve their safety for humans. The State Journal reported in April that Madison's stem cell enterprise may not be as big as those in Boston, San Diego, San Francisco and other big cities on the coasts. Yet Madison likely has more people per capita working in the field — and a drive to stay on top. Let's root for this important sector of our economy that's increasingly important in saving, improving and extending lives.
  • Madison tops 'best cities for young adults' list Milwaukee Journal Sentinel July 25, 2012 If you’re in your 20s, you can dismiss thoughts of moving to Austin, Texas, or Washington. Madison is where you want to be.
  • Olympics fever rises in Madison as 10 athletes with area ties prepare to compete in London Madison.com July 23, 2012 It makes sense that Suzy Favor Hamilton would carve some time out of her busy schedule every four years to relax on her couch and watch some of the track and field competition at the Summer Olympics.
  • Bob Lavigna: Redesign of UW human resources system is opportunity all should welcome Capital Times July 23, 2012 The University of Wisconsin-Madison has been given an unprecedented opportunity to develop a human resources system specifically tailored to the unique needs of a world-class university.
  • Drought expected to drive up cost of milk, cheese USA Today July 19, 2012 Noted: The rises foreshadow expected price hikes in coming months for other food staples, such as meat, says Bruce Jones, a professor of agricultural economy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dairy is affected quickly because cows immediately make less milk.
  • Jeremy Lin Leaves the Knicks: Some Asian-American Fans Feel Betrayed Wall Street Journal July 19, 2012 Quoted: “I don’t care who he plays for — I’m a Lin fan, not a Knicks fan,” says Timothy Yu, an associate professor of Asian American Studies (and Jeremy Lin Studies pioneer) at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. “What I’m mad about is that the Knicks just completely cut him loose — and they’re blaming him for cutting such a hard-nosed deal with the Rockets. The fact of the matter is that even the team that benefited from Linsanity doesn’t believe it’s for real. That really burns me as an Asian American fan. But shed no tears for Jeremy: An Asian American athlete is getting paid like a superstar, because he is one — and that’s cool.”
  • Badgers' Mohammed Ahmed to race against his idols in London Madison.com July 18, 2012 Mohammed Ahmed was pretty hard to miss Tuesday when he showed up to hang out with the press and talk about his excellent adventure.
  • New Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer is a cheesehead, Wisconsin proclaims Los Angeles Times July 18, 2012 Noted: University of Wisconsin, Madison tweeted her a "huge congrats," and retweeted a post from BabieFaceRunde, who wrote, "@marissamayer was my babysitter!!!! Wausau pride!!" 
  • Gwen Jorgensen makes rapid ascent as Olympic triathlete USA Today July 16, 2012 Most athletes spend their whole lives mastering every little part of their sport in the hopes of making it to the Olympics. Gwen Jorgensen will go to London competing in a sport she took up two and a half years ago.
  • Link seen between heat and climate change Wisconsin Radio Network July 16, 2012 Is our hot, drought stricken summer due to climate change? A group of legislators and scientists are calling for policy actions, to reduce the risks associated with heat waves and drought – events they maintain are likely to increase due to climate change. Dr. Jonathan Patz, director of the UW-Madison Global Health Institute, said while scientists can’t conclusively show our hot spell is the result of climate change, trends are clear going forward.
  • Steve Stricker talks John Deere, deer hunting, being a dad & more Golf.com July 11, 2012 Noted: "It’s got a great school system. People are friendly, with those Midwestern values. Madison is a college town, so we’re big University of Wisconsin fans, even though I went to Illinois. We have season-tickets to the Badgers, so it’s fun following those basketball and football teams. It’s big enough, but yet small enough so you get to know a lot of people. It’s a great community -- if you can get past the winters. You’ve got great spring, summer and fall weather -- if you can slash it out those four months of the year. Our winters are getting better."
  • New study disputes link between Facebook and depression Daily Mail (UK) July 11, 2012 Studies have long linked Facebook to negative side-effects, including depression among adolescents. However, new research from the University of Wisconsin has found no link between social media use and the likelihood of depression.
  • Should smoking trigger an R rating? CNN.com July 11, 2012 Quoted: "This is a compelling study that adds to the existing research and leads us to one unequivocal conclusion, and that is that smoking in movies should result in an R rating," says Dr. Michael C. Fiore, director of the University of Wisconsin Center for Tobacco Research, in Madison. Fiore was not involved in the study.
  • Seely on Science: UW-Madison scientists front and center for historic Higgs boson discovery Wisconsin State Journal July 5, 2012 At a moment in science history that many are hailing as one of the most important in a century, UW-Madison researchers were front and center, playing lead roles in a discovery that takes modern physics to the very edge of human understanding. Scientists from UW-Madison were deeply involved in figuring out the physics and building and operating the $10 billion machine used to discover a particle believed to be the so-called “God particle,” responsible for giving matter mass and shaping the very early universe.
  • Heat Waves Hardest On Minority Communities, Experts Say Huffington Post July 9, 2012 Quoted: Steve Vavrus, a senior scientist in the Nelson Institute Center for Climatic Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, says that while more research needs to be done, unusual conditions -- including last winter’s ranking as the fourth-warmest in the U.S.; spring turning out to be the warmest since record-keeping began in 1895; and April marking the end of the warmest 12-month period in U.S. history -- are harbingers of what’s to come if greenhouse warming persists.
  • Wild parsnip gaining ground Waterloo Cedar-Falls Courier July 9, 2012 Quoted: "It is a dangerous plant for several reasons, and probably human health is at the top of the list," says Mark Renz, an authority on invasive plants at the University of Wisconsin.
  • Heat Wave Health Woes: Hot Temperatures And Excess Pollution Put Children At Risk Huffington Post July 5, 2012 Quoted: "Especially at high risk is an infant wrapped up in a blanket," who is unable to tend to himself or tell an adult how he feels, said Jonathan Patz, director of the Global Health Institute at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.
  • Fireworks: A field day for applied science Winston-Salem, N.C. Journal July 3, 2012 When you get all choked up watching Fourth of July fireworks, save a little of that ooh-ahh emotion for chemistry and other scientific disciplines. Bassam Z. Shakhashiri knows all about this: He’s a professor of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin and is the president of the American Chemical Society. Shakhashiri is also an entertainer by choice, giving lectures and programs around the world that help better connect people with the often obtuse world of science.
  • Crops, people wilt in intense heat across southern Wisconsin Isthmus July 3, 2012 Noted: Madison has not seen a June this dry since 1988, says Chris Kucharik, associate professor of agronomy and environmental studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. That year, he explains, "people would categorize as the last real catastrophic drought that happened in the Midwest, but it was much more widespread than what we’re seeing this year."
  • UW men's basketball: Taylor to play for Hawks' Summer League team Madison.com July 3, 2012 Jordan Taylor has made his NBA Summer League plans, and they do not include the Milwaukee Bucks. The former point guard for the University of Wisconsin men’s basketball team said Monday he has accepted an offer to play for the Atlanta Hawks’ entry in the Summer League, which begins later this month in Las Vegas.
  • 'We're all journalists now,' but at what cost? Vancouver Sun July 3, 2012 Quoted: Stephen Ward, former head of the University of B.C. journalism pro-gram, is trying to help us figure out an answer. He’s doing so for the sake of democracy, truth and maybe planetary survival.Much depends upon how we resolve the mind-boggling issues that people like Ward, a veteran war correspondent who is now director of the Center for Journalism Ethics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, are trying to wrestle into some semblance of coherence.