UW-Madison in the Media

A selection of media coverage about the university and its people.

  • Infant stress may alter brain function of girls, study says Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Nov. 12, 2012 Stress during infancy can predict symptoms of anxiety and depression in female adolescents, according to a study published online Sunday and in the journal Nature Neuroscience on Monday. Stress in female children is related to higher levels of the hormone cortisol, which may lead to altered brain function in adolescence, according to the study, written by a group of researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • Montee Ball and Wisconsin Back to Their Old Selves New York Times Nov. 12, 2012 The room was quiet, his teammates hanging on his every word, when Montee Ball apologized for what he had not seen coming. Someone had called his name, he turned, saw a fist, then nothing. He awoke in a hospital bed with a concussion and a face swollen from five men kicking his head.
  • UW Law opens legal clinic for veterans Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Nov. 9, 2012 Military veterans in the Madison area have a new resource available starting Thursday -- a free legal clinic run by the University of Wisconsin’s law school.
  • Oh, what a night! UW grad talks about Tony-winning 'Jersey Boys' Wisconsin State Journal Nov. 8, 2012 There are stories of people who have seen “Jersey Boys,” the 2005 blockbuster musical about Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, a half-dozen times. At its Chicago opening in 2007, the boys got three standing ovations — one before intermission — and enjoyed a successful run for two-and-a-half years. The year before, the show won four Tony Awards, including Best Musical. None of this is particularly surprising to Marshall Brickman.
  • Seely on Science: UW weather scientists at forefront of Sandy forecasts Wisconsin State Journal Nov. 2, 2012 Once again, as a huge storm churned across the Atlantic Ocean, UW-Madison researchers were right in the middle of it — sort of. As Hurricane Sandy barreled its way toward the East Coast Sunday and an appointment with the history books, about 20 scientists toiled in front of computer screens on the UW-Madison campus at the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies. Their behind-the-scenes work — providing startling satellite images as well as detailed analysis of what those images were telling us — helped the National Hurricane Center and the National Weather Service provide forecasts that proved remarkably accurate. “This is evidence of a revolution that’s been going on quietly here for 20 years,” said Jonathan Martin, a professor and chairman of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences.
  • Morgridge Institute lands cybersecurity grant Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Nov. 2, 2012 Scientists at the Morgridge Institute for Research at the University of Wisconsin - Madison and three other institutions have received a five-year, $23.6 million grant from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to bolster the nation’s cybersecurity.
  • UW-Madison grad organizing relief effort to help Superstorm Sandy victims WTMJ-TV Milwaukee Nov. 2, 2012 You may know him as number 78 or Badger Jake, but one University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate founded an organization that’s helping folks outside the borders of our state.
  • Wisconsin's Zach Bohannon on devastating injury to Badgers teammate CBS Sports Nov. 1, 2012 There are seven letters, two words, and one phrase that no athlete, but more specifically, no basketball player, ever wants to hear over his entire career: Torn ACL.
  • UW-Madison Scientists Share Critical Satellite Images NBC-15 Oct. 30, 2012 Images compiled at UW-Madison are helping track Hurricane Sandy, in almost real-time.
  • Computers, Pinch Of Art Aid Hurricane Forecasters NPR Oct. 29, 2012 Quoted: "Sometimes there’s what we call the ’Model of the Year,’ " says Christopher Velden, a senior researcher at the University of Wisconsin, Madison’s Space Science and Engineering Center.
  • Campaigns bombard ad-weary Wisconsinites Green Bay Press Gazette Oct. 29, 2012 Quoted: “You can’t take a breath without seeing a political ad right now,” said Michael Wagner, a political expert at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “If you haven’t seen a political ad in Wisconsin, you must not own a TV set.”
  • Fiscal issues take center stage at UW-Madison debate Wisconsin State Journal Oct. 26, 2012 While President Barack Obama and challenger Mitt Romney have traded barbs about Big Bird and big government, two of the nation’s foremost economic advisers were at UW-Madison Thursday to speak to students about the role of economic issues in the upcoming election.
  • First 'climate president' will face challenges Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Oct. 26, 2012 Climate change has registered barely a peep in the presidential contest between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. But no matter who wins on Nov. 6, the next occupant of the Oval Office is likely to become the first "climate president." [A column by Paul Robbins, director of the Nelson Institute.]
  • UW alum's real life efforts are no joke Madison.com Oct. 22, 2012 You might not recognize Josh Bycel, but there’s a good chance you’ve seen his TV shows. And, if you read the Onion in the early 1990s, you might also have seen his naked rear end. A UW-Madison alumnus, Bycel will return to campus Thursday as the first speaker for this year’s Distinguished Lecture Series, a program of talks aimed at students and faculty. Bycel, who attended UW from 1989-93, will discuss his work as an executive producer for such shows as “Scrubs,” “Psych” and “Happy Endings,” as well as his foundation, OneKid OneWorld, which helps build schools in Kenya and El Salvador.
  • Fighting cancer, one free throw at a time WTMJ-TV Milwaukee Oct. 22, 2012 The college basketball season is right around the corner! On Thursday, Oct. 25, UW-Madison students will have the opportunity to team up with the Wisconsin men’s basketball team and Coaches vs. Cancer to take a shot at fighting the world’s deadliest disease.
  • Archaeologists plan new dig at Troy CBS News Oct. 18, 2012 Armed with shovels, trowels and new biotechnology tools, archaeologists plan to march into Troy next year for excavations at the famed ancient city."Our goal is to add a new layer of information to what we already know about Troy," said William Aylward, a classics professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who will lead the expedition. "The archaeological record is rich. If we take a closer look with new scientific tools for study of ancient biological and cultural environments, there is much to be found for telling the story of this world heritage site."
  • UW search panel to rely on interim chancellor David Ward's know-how Wisconsin State Journal Oct. 16, 2012 As UW-Madison starts public meetings Tuesday on who should be its next chancellor, the university can depend on one well-placed person to sell the job: David Ward, who’s been interim chancellor since 2011. He said that the relationship between the flagship campus and the University of Wisconsin System has improved since former chancellor Biddy Martin unsuccessfully sought to split UW-Madison from the UW System.
  • UW-Madison ranks high in research worldwide, study says Capital Times Oct. 16, 2012 UW-Madison has been ranked in the top 25 of universities worldwide when it comes to the quantity and quality of research studies published. The 2012 Performance Ranking of Scientific Papers for World Universities puts UW-Madison at No. 22 out of 500 research universities included in the study produced by National Taiwan University.
  • On, Wisconsin! Readers rank Madison best college football town USA Today Oct. 12, 2012 When Madison mayor Paul Soglin attended the University of Wisconsin during the 1960s, he wasn’t a big Badger football fan.
  • Author Lauren Redniss explores love, history and radiation Wisconsin State Journal Oct. 11, 2012 In a narrative that spans more than 100 years, Lauren Redniss uses scientific papers, historic photos, and vibrant, at times unsettling, drawings that come to brilliant life on the pages of “Radioactive,” the book selected by UW-Madison for its Go Big Read program. On Monday, Redniss will talk at Union South about her experiences researching and creating her work.
  • Networks Like Split-Screens in Debates, Even if Candidates Don’t New York Times Oct. 10, 2012 Quoted: Dietram A. Scheufele, a communications professor at Wisconsin.
  • Wisconsin whey muscles its way to global food importance Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Oct. 9, 2012 Got whey? From infant formula and protein supplements to sports drinks and nutrition bars, whey - the nursery rhyme food that was once a ditch-dumped byproduct of cheese making - is taking on growing clout as a global food ingredient. And food scientists, including researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, are seeking even more uses for the protein-dense product that can help build muscle and lean bodies.
  • Conditions just right for box elder bugs Baraboo News Republic Oct. 3, 2012 Noted: University of Wisconsin-Madison entomologist Phil Pellitteri said 2012 has been one of the worst years for box elder bugs since 1988 when Wisconsin endured drought-like conditions during the spring and summer months.
  • Madison ranked second-best small city for college students Badger Herald Oct. 2, 2012 The American Institute for Economic Research declared Madison the second-best small city in the United States for college students on Monday, moving up four spots from last year.
  • Susanna Daniel reflects on Madison, Wisconsin Newsweek and The Daily Beast Oct. 1, 2012 I came to Madison, Wis., for the first time in 2001, intending to stay a year but privately hoping to find a home of the heart, since otherwise I had no particular place to go. I’d lived most of my life in Miami and New York City, and couldn’t envision a future in either place. I was in my late 20s, torn between wanting to romp around on unspecified adventures and wanting to build the kind of life—spouse, kids, writing career—that benefits from a home base.
  • U.S. kids exposed to 4 hours of background TV daily Rochester Democrat and Chronicle Oct. 1, 2012 Quoted: Heather Kirkorian, an assistant professor of human development and family studies a researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who has published studies on background television’s impact on both parent-child interaction and children’s play patterns, says "until now we could only guess at the extent of the impact in children’s day-to-day lives." The new study "documents just how great the real-world impact may be, particularly for very young children."
  • Hundreds run for Zimmermann's memory, justice WISC-TV 3 Oct. 1, 2012 Brittany Zimmermann was just 21 years old when her murdered body was found in an apartment near the UW-Madison campus in the spring of 2008.
  • Women play larger role in science at UW Badger Herald Sept. 26, 2012 Recent studies are finding that the number of women participating in science-related fields has increased at the University of Wisconsin after years of male domination. 
  • On the Court with Bobbie Kelsey WISC-TV 3 Sept. 25, 2012 At first glance, Bobbie Kelsey is a laid-back Southern girl who reels people in with her down-home charm. But spend a chunk of time with the University of Wisconsin women’s basketball coach and you’ll discover a ferocious intensity that knows no bounds.
  • Your detour to a stress-free life CNN.com Sept. 25, 2012 Noted: "Our brains are constantly being shaped, most often unwittingly," says Richard Davidson, director of the Lab for Affective Neuroscience at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. "But there are things we can do to purposefully shape them and reduce anxiety."