UW-Madison in the Media

A selection of media coverage about the university and its people.

  • Women play larger role in science at UW Badger Herald Sept. 26, 2012 Recent studies are finding that the number of women participating in science-related fields has increased at the University of Wisconsin after years of male domination. 
  • On the Court with Bobbie Kelsey WISC-TV 3 Sept. 25, 2012 At first glance, Bobbie Kelsey is a laid-back Southern girl who reels people in with her down-home charm. But spend a chunk of time with the University of Wisconsin women’s basketball coach and you’ll discover a ferocious intensity that knows no bounds.
  • Your detour to a stress-free life CNN.com Sept. 25, 2012 Noted: "Our brains are constantly being shaped, most often unwittingly," says Richard Davidson, director of the Lab for Affective Neuroscience at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. "But there are things we can do to purposefully shape them and reduce anxiety."
  • Campus Connection: Madison voted America’s best college football town Capital Times Sept. 21, 2012 Madison earned the top spot in a USA Today reader survey that asked participants to vote for the country’s best college football town. USA Today reports that the survey generated more than 50,000 votes. Blacksburg, Va., -- the home of Virginia Tech – placed second among a list of 15 finalists nominated by five sportswriters and broadcasters. Columbus, Ohio -- home of the Big Ten’s Ohio State Buckeyes -- placed third.
  • Seattle Seahawks QB Russell Wilson measured by more than just height ESPN.com Sept. 20, 2012 When nobody was watching, a little quarterback practiced for his day in front of the cameras. He used a hairbrush for a microphone. His dad did the interviewing, prepping him in the hopes that one day a roomful of people would listen. Anything in his control, the kid would be prepared for it. The tightest spiral? He was up at 6 a.m. to work on that. The smartest guy in the locker room? He once drove 17 hours straight, from Richmond, Va., to the University of Wisconsin just to get a copy of the playbook so he could become one with it over the Fourth of July weekend.
  • Ecologists convert wildlife professor's notes into soundscape of 1940s Wisconsin Wired Sept. 20, 2012 Two ecologists have scoured through meticulous birdsong notes taken 70 years ago by conservation pioneer Aldo Leopold and transformed them into a soundscape of an ecosystem that no longer exists.
  • Pacifiers may stunt boys' emotional growth, UW study says Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Sept. 18, 2012 Parents who don’t want their baby boys to grow up emotionally stunted may want to pocket their pacifiers during the daytime. A new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison suggests frequent pacifier use during the day may disrupt the emotional development of baby boys because it limits their opportunity to mimic the facial expressions of others - a tool that may help them better understand emotions and learn empathy.
  • UW, GE Healthcare partner for new imaging research facility WISC-TV 3 Sept. 14, 2012 The University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and GE Healthcare on Thursday announced a major partnership for creating a new imaging research facility. The aim of the project is to ultimately improve health care with better diagnostic tools, specifically imaging technology. "This represents a remarkable opportunity to put UW-Madison at the very next cutting-edge frontier of diagnostic imaging and radiology research," said Dr. Bob Golden, dean of the UW School of Medicine and Public Health.
  • Stress Disrupts Short-Term Memory Function, Research Suggests Huffington Post UK Sept. 17, 2012 Scientists believe that stress could have a direct impact on short-term memory. In a recent study, a group of psychologists at the University of Wisconsin–Madison noted a link between stress and the mind’s ability to ‘remember’ information.
  • Chinese River Turns Red, And Nobody Is Quite Sure Why International Business Times Sept. 10, 2012 Noted: Scientists are looking to a natural cause for the river’s change in color. Emily Stanley, who researches limnology (the study of inland waters) at the University of Wisconsin, believes it is possible microorganisms could be behind the sudden change, but that it is probable there is a much better explanation for it.
  • UW-Madison, Madison College to pilot test e-textbooks Capital Times Sept. 6, 2012 UW-Madison, Madison College and more than two dozen other institutions of higher education are taking part in a pilot project to evaluate digital learning materials as an alternative to the more traditional — but costly and bulky — textbooks students have relied on for as long as most can remember. “By working as part of a community like this where numerous other institutions are involved, this gives us more leverage with the publishers than if we were working alone on examining e-texts,” says Bruce Maas, UW-Madison’s vice provost for information technology.
  • The Baffling Nexus of Climate Change and Health New York Times Sept. 7, 2012 Noted: But predicting the future is never easy. Tony Goldberg, a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who studies the ecology and evolution of infectious disease, said the introduction of West Nile into the United States showed how challenging it can be to forecast new public health risks.
  • Citizen Dave: Welcome to Madison, and to the rest of your life Isthmus Sept. 5, 2012 For about 6,000 eighteen-year-olds, the boot camp of adulthood has just started.
  • UW students dropping cell phones in favor of smartphones Wisconsin State Journal Sept. 4, 2012 Mobile computing has gone viral at UW-Madison while regular cell phones are going the way of the land line, according to the university’s 2012 Student Computing Survey.
  • UW-Madison earns $57 million on licensing research AP Aug. 31, 2012 A new survey shows the University of Wisconsin-Madison and its alumni foundation have earned more than $57 million in fiscal 2011 from licensing research innovations.
  • Der Stiftskeller murals to be reconstructed after Memorial Union renovation Isthmus Aug. 30, 2012 UW-Madison officials know how attached students and alumni are to anything related to Der Rathskeller and Der Stiftskeller -- the murals, the German beer steins and the wooden tables, inlaid with decades of carved graffiti.
  • U.S. cases of West Nile virus set record, deaths rise: CDC Reuters Aug. 30, 2012 Quoted: "Higher temperatures foster faster reproduction of both the mosquito and the virus," said Tony Goldberg, professor of epidemiology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, who has studied urban outbreaks of West Nile since shortly after the virus arrived in the Midwest.
  • Ice Age Melt Offers Future Climate Clues Voice of America Aug. 30, 2012 When the climate began to warm during the last Ice Age about 23,000 years ago, much of the Northern Hemisphere was covered in ice. University of Wisconsin geologist Anders Carlson studies ice sheet melt from land and ocean sediment cores.  His study describes what prehistoric Earth was like in North America and Northern Europe some 140,000 years ago.  
  • Board of Regents Okay UW-Madison Dairy Facility Upgrades Wisconsin Ag Connection Aug. 27, 2012 A proposed $75-million remodeling project for the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Babcock Hall has receiving the blessing of the UW Board of Regents. Last week, the panel gave its approval to a plan that would provide half of the funding for remodeling and expanding the dairy research and teaching space and ice-cream and cheese-making facilities in Babcock Hall. The project also includes building a new livestock and poultry products laboratory.
  • Sensors for Brain Injuries May Help Future Athletes New York Times Aug. 27, 2012 Noted: At the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Thad G. Walker, an atomic physicist, uses optical magnetometry to monitor the magnetic fields of the beating heart rather than the brain. Professor Walker and his group have created small magnetometers that are an inexpensive alternative to superconducting devices now used to spot various heart abnormalities in a fetus.
  • How Long Do You Want to Live? New York Times Aug. 27, 2012 But another stem cell pioneer, James Thomson of the University of Wisconsin, believes that stem cell solutions will be a long time coming for more complex organs. “We’re a long way from transplanting cells into a human brain or nervous system,” he said.
  • Arms and the Duck New York Times Aug. 27, 2012 Quoted: “You don’t mess with hunting and fishing because that’s part of who we are,” says Kathy Cramer Walsh, a professor at the University of Wisconsin who specializes in civic engagement. “A lot of times, talk about regulating guns and ammunition is seen as the outside trying to change who we are.”
  • We dare you to take a real vacation CNN.com Aug. 21, 2012 Quoted: "A lot of people are really busy because they take a little dose of family and then they want to back off," says Joanne Cantor, a communications professor emeritus at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. "You can see parents with teenagers and see teens going for their gadgets all the time. It’s a good thing, but not necessarily the easiest thing to devote more time to your family."
  • UW Lifesaving Station quietly rescues boaters and swimmers Isthmus Aug. 20, 2012 Nestled on the southeast shores of Lake Mendota next to James Madison Park is the UW Lifesaving Station — a concrete structure resembling a fortress.
  • Using Twitter to Crack Down on Bullying Time.com Aug. 17, 2012 It’s hard to prevent bullying if you don’t know it’s happening. That’s why researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a program that they say is capable of detecting evidence of bullying from among the hundreds of millions of tweets sent each day.
  • Biker returns home after 1,700-mile trek Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune Aug. 17, 2012 After traveling 1,700 miles, dealing with 14 flat tires, getting chased by more than 100 dogs, and developing some prominent tan lines, Matt Stoltz was happy to be home in Wisconsin Rapids this week from his bike trek to West Palm Beach, Fla.
  • Agricultural research celebrates 100 years in Marshfield The Marshfield News-Herald Aug. 17, 2012 The University of Wisconsin Marshfield Agricultural Research Station celebrated its 100th anniversary Thursday with an all-day open house along with a re-dedication program that featured speakers from all levels of government.
  • Kids' abilities to delay gratification may keep them thin later in life FOX News Aug. 16, 2012 The ability to delay gratification as a child may lower a person’s chances of being overweight later in life, according to new research.
  • Yoga, deep breathing used to address soldiers' post-traumatic stress Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Aug. 16, 2012 Rich Low dreamed of Iraq long after he returned home from the war. The memories haunted him when he was awake, too. About six months after his deployment, he was driving at night when a sudden burst of lightning snapped him back to Baghdad and the bomb that exploded near him during a thunderstorm. Low’s pulse raced as adrenaline surged through his body even though he was driving on a road far from any war zone.He didn’t know post-traumatic stress was affecting him. Not until he took part in a University of Wisconsin-Madison study that taught Iraq and Afghanistan veterans yoga, meditation and breathing techniques to cope with PTSD.
  • On Campus: UW grad student's 'Feminist Ryan Gosling' blog hits the big time Wisconsin State Journal Aug. 14, 2012 Be careful what you blog about — it might make you famous. That’s the lesson learned by UW-Madison graduate student Danielle Henderson. When she started a blog with photos of hunky movie star Ryan Gosling mouthing cheeky, made-up feminist thoughts, she intended it as a study guide for herself and a source of laughs for a few like-minded friends. She’s about to start her second year in a master’s program in gender and women’s studies. Now, after attracting more than 20,000 followers, the blog feministryangosling.tumblr.com is being published in a book, "Feminist Ryan Gosling," coming out on Tuesday.