Faculty/staff news

  • Photo: Ernest Micek New $3M distinguished chair at UW-Madison honors influential alumnus Jan. 28, 2015 A newly established professorship will allow the University of Wisconsin-Madison to hire new faculty to build upon its widely recognized leadership in chemical and biological engineering. Supported by a $3 million commitment from the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), the Ernest Micek Distinguished Chair in Chemical and Biological Engineering will honor a UW-Madison graduate with a long record of service to UW-Madison.
  • Chancellor Blank reacts to the latest state budget news Jan. 27, 2015
  • Calculating the future of solar-fuel refineries Jan. 23, 2015 A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has developed a new tool to help plot the future of solar fuels. In a paper recently published in the journal Energy & Environmental Science, a team led by chemical and biological engineering Professors Christos Maravelias and George Huber outlined a tool to help engineers better gauge the overall yield, efficiency and costs associated with scaling solar-fuel production processes up into large-scale refineries.
  • Photo: An island of forest in a sea of soy agriculture in Mato Grosso Study shows Brazil’s Soy Moratorium still needed to preserve Amazon Jan. 22, 2015 Today, fewer chicken nuggets can trace their roots to cleared Amazon rain forest.
  • Photo: Aldo Leopold UW–Madison offers free Leopold’s land ethic online course and February event Jan. 22, 2015 The University of Wisconsin-Madison will offer its next round of six Massive Open Online Courses beginning Jan. 26 with “The Land Ethic Reclaimed: Perceptive Hunting, Aldo Leopold and Conservation.” MOOCs are free online, noncredit learning experiences that allow people from around the globe to participate. Participants watch educational videos, engage in discussion forums, read articles and often take quizzes or complete educational activities. More than 135,000 registrants from approximately 140 countries and all 50 states signed up for UW-Madison’s previous phase one pilot of four courses.
  • UW-Madison to participate in national sexual assault climate survey Jan. 22, 2015 Taking action in response to concerns about sexual assault, UW-Madison will take part in a national effort to gather data on the campus climate as it relates to sexual violence.
  • Photo: Dog brains with and without Pelizaeus Merzbacher disease modeling Rare neurological disease shines light on health of essential nerve cells Jan. 22, 2015 Ian Duncan is a Scotsman with the iron discipline and stamina of a competitive marathoner, triathlete and cross-country skier. As a neuroscientist at the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he's applied his tenacity to a rare genetic disorder.
  • Two Administrative Improvement Award teams will receive supplemental funding from campus Jan. 22, 2015 Two teams have been chosen to receive funds that will support initiatives related to projects that won UW-Madison’s 2014 Administrative Improvement Awards. These supplements are a new component of the Administrative Improvement Awards, which were launched in 2013 to recognize the essential role of administrative work and a culture of continuous improvement in the success of university missions. Team recipients of the 2014 awards were eligible to apply for supplemental investment funds.
  • Photo: Noah Lim Doing it for the team: Business study tests motivational techniques Jan. 21, 2015 Noah Lim, an associate marketing professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Wisconsin School of Business, is shedding light on sales incentives that could help managers devise incentive programs with better returns on investment.
  • Photo: Joshua Moon Johnson Multicultural Student Center welcomes conversation Jan. 21, 2015 UW-Madison, like many communities, is grappling with how to promote such a dialogue in the wake of events in Ferguson, Staten Island and elsewhere. And the Multicultural Student Center offers a safe place to have those complicated conversations, says director Joshua Moon Johnson.
  • Photo: Campus conversation on diversity and inclusion Outsized attendance marks first Conversation on Diversity and Inclusion Jan. 20, 2015 Organizers of the first Conversation on Diversity and Inclusion hoped that around 200 people might show up to the discussion, held Tuesday afternoon in Union South’s Varsity Hall. Nearly twice that number attended.
  • Photo: Cows in dairy barn UW experts forecasting 2015 Wisconsin agriculture trends Jan. 20, 2015 In 2014, the total net farm income in Wisconsin reached an all-time high of more than $4 billion, but agricultural experts at the University of Wisconsin-Madison are predicting some changes in 2015. Bruce Jones, a professor of agricultural and applied economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will be among a handful of UW-Madison and UW-Extension experts to recap the status of Wisconsin’s agricultural enterprise in 2014 and discuss trends developing for 2015 at the Wisconsin Agricultural Economic Outlook Forum on Wednesday, Jan. 21.
  • Employees have opportunities to learn about HR Design Jan. 20, 2015 Several opportunities to learn more about HR Design, the campus’s new human resources system, are coming in the next two months.
  • Finalists to lead UW Press will visit campus Jan. 20, 2015 A nationwide search by the office of the vice chancellor for research and graduate education has identified two finalists for director of University of Wisconsin Press.
  • Photo: Professor Tom Reps, graduate students Jason Breck and David Bingham Brown, and Professor Ben Liblit New research project funded by Department of Defense will enable faster, better coding Jan. 16, 2015 Pliny, a new research project for writing more error-free, secure code, is being funded by a four-year, $11 million grant recently announced by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), part of the U.S. Department of Defense. UW-Madison computer scientists will collaborate with their counterparts at Rice University in Houston (which will lead the project), the University of Texas at Austin, and the company GrammaTech.
  • Photo: Erin Arango-Escalante UW-Madison language learning resource preparing to support bilingual preschoolers nationwide Jan. 16, 2015 Preschool teachers who work with bilingual or multilingual children in five states across the country, and as many as 13 additional states, soon will begin using new learning tools and receiving specialized training developed and provided by WIDA, an international nonprofit specializing in English and Spanish language development based at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • Photo: Lake Mendota algae Humanity has exceeded 4 of 9 ‘planetary boundaries,’ according to researchers Jan. 15, 2015 An international team of researchers says climate change, the loss of biosphere integrity, land-system change, and altered biogeochemical cycles like phosphorus and nitrogen runoff have all passed beyond levels that put humanity in a “safe operating space.” Civilization has crossed four of nine so-called planetary boundaries as the result of human activity, according to a report published today in Science by the 18-member research team. Among them is Steve Carpenter, director of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Limnology and the only U.S.-based researcher on the study.
  • Photo: Xiaojun Tan UW-Madison scientists find how many cancers may evade treatment Jan. 15, 2015 Xiaojun Tan, a graduate student in Richard A. Anderson’s lab at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, made an unexpected observation while studying the locations inside cells where the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR, can be found. His subsequent investigation revealed how cancer was evading treatment drugs: by sneaking through the cellular back door.
  • Photo: Sam Gellman Chemical dial controls attraction between water-repelling molecules Jan. 14, 2015 Abbott, Gellman and a group of University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers have provided new insights on hydrophobic interactions within complex systems. In a study published today in the journal Nature, the researchers show how the nearby presence of polar (water-attracted, or hydrophilic) substances can change the way the nonpolar hydrophobic groups want to stick to each other.
  • Carbon nanotube finding could lead to flexible electronics with longer battery life Jan. 14, 2015 University of Wisconsin-Madison materials engineers have made a significant leap toward creating higher-performance electronics with improved battery life — and the ability to flex and stretch. Led by materials science Associate Professor Michael Arnold and Professor Padma Gopalan, the team has reported the highest-performing carbon nanotube transistors ever demonstrated. In addition to paving the way for improved consumer electronics, this technology could also have specific uses in industrial and military applications.